Dublin Selected *152

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The le cool flag was at half mast this week with the news of Commander Neil Armstrong's death. Only weeks earlier, fueled by booze and banter, we discussed the moon landings outside a city centre pub.

Sure, there was politics at play when JFK announced to to the world 'We choose to go to the moon' but we hold firm our belief that the achievement was, and still is, the greatest symbol of man's progression to date.

The successful mission was a massive gamble in the ability of a nation to deliver. It was the culmination of a huge group effort, massive amounts of investment and yet, was born for the good of all mankind.

In a world where group effort has been replaced by self interest, science has become a whipping stick and profit has replaced progress we wonder if Louis CK is right when he says that 'everything is amazing and nobody is happy.'

We talked this and more that night, and at some point the debate got lost in a pint glass, right before before someone said: "Government should build societies, not economies." Word.

Who has descended from outer space this week? Ciaran, Michael, Kate Frances, Jerath or Camille?

'..technology and its unexplained power drives our desire to envision the future.' - Grace McEvoy
... Read More
   
 

August 30 2012


where
23 Benurb Street, Dublin 7.

when
see link

how much
Depends


Wuff

I really didn't want to like this place. The increasingly conceited denizens of D7 have soured me with their carping about decent pubs, fewer stabbings and that chi-chi deli of theirs. No dice, Wuff had me at hello, and a couple of restorative mimosas banished the bile entirely. The comfortably industrial room is a very pleasant place to be, all down-pipe grey with tangerine accents. Everything is just so, right down to the tea-pots. The commendably well priced menus are concise, the dishes uniformly well executed. There was a very good breakfast, excelent fish & chips, a standby cheeseburger. Dinner is a little more ambitious, with a wine list chosen by someone who enjoys wine. This is the neighbourhood place you really don't deserve. We shall be regulars. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

August 30 2012


where
The Dragon, 64-65 South Great Georges Street


when
10pm - 3am

how much
See link for guestlist

club night
Rodeo Bull

Ever since I first saw this Primal Scream video, I have wanted to be a cowgirl. I bought gaudy green and yellow cowboy boots and sewed tassels on to everything I owned, then topped it off with a Stetson. However, no amount of hard-boozing and drunken brawling would convince the leaders of the cowgirl council (basically the First Ladies of Country) to give me my cowgirl card. Apparently, I was lacking in one skill. Rode-eee-OH! The mechanised Rodeo is a tricky one to defeat. At first it's pretty tame, like riding a bison-shaped tumble dryer, but then it gets more hardcore than a hazlenut Revel. Jeez Loueez, it's a helluva lotta fun but be prepared to spend the next day walking like John Wayne. Phromo are sure gonna have a packed out saloon this week! / Kate Frances

 

August 30 2012


where
The Science Gallery, Trinity College, Pearse Street, Dublin 2
01 896 4091‎
Location Map

when
8:30am - 1:30pm

how much
Free, but booking essential

talk
The Future of Energy

Sustainable energy is awesome...Solar power equals sun tan. Kinetic wave power equals a killer surf, and wind power means giant windmills! I wish they'd make 'em all shiny though, like the ones that you get at the funfair. If you also give a flying damn about how we can responsibly continue to steward our lil globe in such a way as to not leave it crumbling and crying like a drunk student teacher being refused entry into Coppers on a Friday night, come along and get environMENTAL! At this talk (cheers, Science Gallery!) you'll be in the safe hands of Charles F. Bolden from NASA and Mark Ferguson of the SFI, as well as the less competent hands of Pat Rabitte, who should be good for a little light relief. They'll be discussing how we can prevent crisis point approaching and sending us into a parody of this Pierce Brosnan film. / Kate Frances

   
 

August 31 2012


where
Sweeney's Bar, 32 Dame Street Dublin 2


when
8pm

how much
Free

party
String Theory Soundsystem LP Launch

For too long I stood on my Stags Head stoop, staring across as the Mongrels spilled out onto Dame Lane with their long hair, strange clothes and funny smelling cigarettes. 'Next week, I'm going in there,' I'd lie to myself as the music pumped out of the open doors where a mural of Jimi Hendrix stood guard. And then I did it. I went in and found one of the best and sweatiest live music venues in Dublin. Standing millimeters away from a lanky, long haired bass player as lost control in a crowd of enthusiastic people was an improvement on the usual pub experience and I've been returning ever since. Tonight, String Theory Sound System celebrate dropping an LP and I'll be there, dropping my knees in unison to their funk-electro-techno-drum n bass-hip hop beats. Much better than a stag stoop party  /  Vernon Steel

 

August 31 2012


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€8

tribute
Fire in Cairo

Do you need a cure for the Electric Picnic blues? What if I said that cure could be The Cure (or well, The Cure Mark II)? Would you give me a big hug and buy me a pint of Heineken? Yes? Well be prepared to part with a fiver and more (for the chiropractor that you'll have to consult post-bending down to give me that bear hug.) Still, the pain of parting with so much moola should be eased by watching someone who looks,  acts and has the morbid demeanour of Robert Smith reminding you how awesome Friday is, or (if you're close to tears) patting you on the back and whispering Boys don't cry into your ear. And why would you cry? You don't have to fork out more than €200 squideroo to watch someone with wonkily applied lipstick flail about singing about Lovecats, cos you can see it here! / Kate Frances

   
 

September 01 2012


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
€5.20-€8.90

screening
Wayne's World

As the IFI prepares to make the transition from adolescence to adulthood and celebrates its twentieth year in Temple Bar, it presents a season of landmark films from that twenty-year period. Kicking off the season is a film which led to a very awkward conversation between nine-year-old me and my parents due to its extensive use of the term "schwing", inspired countless Bohemian Rhapsody sing-alongs and taught us some fascinating facts about Milwaukee. I am, of course, talking about Wayne's World. “No way!” you say. Way! Wayne's World is pure, unadulterated silliness and responsible for the dissemination of such popular catchphrases as; “We’re not worthy! We’re not worthy!” and, “That’s what she said!” Revisit this classic on the big screen and be reminded of why it’s so totally excellent. / Amy O'Connor

 

September 01 2012


where
Basement of All City Records,
Crow Street,
Temple Bar,
Dublin 2

when
See link for details

how much
From €20

workshop
Cut and Sew Classes

As seen on Twitter recently: "The less you have, the more important your haircut." Preach, Twitter. When I first stumbled upon Cut & Sew in the basement bowels of All City Records, I didn't have much. But neither did Sean the barber. As meagre mates, we struck it off. Me with only my hair to declare and him with his idea to turn this minimalistic space into a proper working barber shop. I still have the haircut but Sean has moved on, adding more clients to his list and making a name for his shop. So much so, he's tinkering with the idea of teaching others the way of the scissors. The Cut & Sew Academy is about to be launched and I'm looking at the crash course being offered at €20. It's not clear if you will be able to cut your own hair after the course but I'm willing to try it out. No more bowls, no more tears. / Vernon Steel

 

September 01 2012


where
Phibsborough

when
see link

how much
see link

festival
PhizzFest 2012

Phizzfest always offers a motley crew of strange but wonderful events, and this year is no different. There will be high-brow history events, with History Ireland setting up a Hedge School in Dalymount Park, transporting kids back to pre-famine and pre-Christian Brothers Ireland to give 'em a fact or two to take home. Pauline McLynn will be reading from her first young adult novel (ah, go on!) and Fighting Words will be making poets out of tweenagers. The icing on the cake has to be the Duck Race though, which I didn't know existed outside of the backwater that is Foulksmills, Wexford. Yes, people in Wexford bet on plastic ducks. Which they race. It's a great introduction to ducks and gambling for your kids. / Kate Frances

 

September 01 2012


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€5

club night
Ready Steady Go!

The L'Oréal aisle in Boots will be deserted this Saturday afternoon as good Mod girls stock up on enough hairspray to freeze an oncoming missile in the air and boys buy so much Brylcreem they could wax their hair AND Bradley Wiggins' bike in the anticipation of Ready Steady Go!, a mod and Northern Soul night at the Grand Social. If Northern Soul could sweep gruff, mining types from 1960s Wigan into Billy Elliots, imagine what it could do in Dublin? There will be music from ReSoul and The Statics, who are the current mutton chops of modern mod music plus some good old fashioned pop to boogie along to. Think mini-skirts and sharp haircuts, a splattering of electric blue suits and the odd Lambretta outside. Anyways,  "I don't give a monkey's arsehole about Mods and Rockers. Underneath, we're all the same, ain't we?" / Kate Frances

   
 

September 02 2012


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
4.40pm

how much
€5.20-€8.90

screening
The Crying Game

Neil Jordan may have interviewed vampires and freed Ireland (though sadly not at once) on film, but his finest hour came in this 1992 classic, winning a goddamn Oscar in the process. It may have been spoiled everywhere from Father Ted to The Simpsons, but it’s one of those films where the less you know about it, the better. For the uninitiated, all that needs to be known is that it follows the story of Fergus (Stephen Rea), an IRA member who travels to London to watch over the beloved of a British soldier (Whittaker) he made a promise to, just as his past catches up with him. The film features a career-best performance from Stephen Rea, and an interesting British accent from Forrest Whittaker of which the kindest can be said is the fact that it’s not quite a Van Dyke. But as Mayor Quimby himself said of it- “man, is that a good movie”. / Ciarán Hall
 

September 02 2012


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
1pm, 3.25pm & 8.20pm

how much
€7.50/€9

cinema
SAMSARA

For a movie that is without narrative, dialogue, a story or major Hollywood stars, SAMSARA will manage to leave you speechless. This is not a documentary, not a travel film or not like anything you'll have seen before. I loved it. It is easily the best visual feast I have ever treated my eyes to and I can't wait to see it again. An experience captured in stunning, beautiful and sometimes heartbreaking scenes, SAMSARA taught me just how much about the world I don't know. Over 100 locations in 25 countries are all filmed by Ron Fricke in a distinctive, creative and unobtrusive style that made me think "How did I never know about this?" With powerful music, this imagery should at times make you laugh, make you angry and make you feel very humble. It's been acclaimed as life affirming and phenomenal. That it is. / Darragh Doyle

   
 

September 03 2012


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€5.20-€8.90

screening
When We Were Kings

Muhammad Ali was the last true hero of our day. “He was handsome, he was funny, and he was articulate. He was whoopin’ ass too.” Except for George Foreman’s. The heavyweight champion carried the expectations of America in his gloves: to floor the loud-mouthed and often vilified underdog. Not to be outdone, Ali shouldered the hopes of the African nation. He shouted to the world that black America owed a great debt to its motherland and that he would see her triumph. He shouted right up until the first bell rang, and then lowered his voice to a whisper; “They told me you could punch, George!” Thoroughly engaging and always entertaining, When We Were Kings mirrors the personality of boxing’s greatest icon, following the events that led to the Rumble in the Jungle. And when that final punch lands, it’s like a cement truck of inspiration to the face. / Jerath Head

 

September 03 2012


where
Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
11am - 6pm (until Sept 19)

how much
Free

exhibition
A Shimmer of Possibility

There's no starker contrast to this body of photographic work by Paul Graham than the festooned buffonery of a Republican National Convention. On our TV screens there's the right-wing razzmatazz of a hyped up hall, which to my bafflement, may represent almost half of the electorate come November. In the echo chamber of the Douglas Hyde are this series of glimpses of Americana. Graham sets about capturing what he calls "the opaque threshold of the now”. A man mows a patch of ground, a quizzical face is crowned by a wiry copper glint of hair, people wait at a bus stop. This is life, unremarkable as it may seem yet profoundly precious when one stops to think. These shimmers are life as lived without fanfare. And whilst one might strain to glimpse the possibility, there's as much invested here in the quiet margins of the quotidian than in Tampa this weekend. / Zach Joyce

   
 

September 04 2012


where
Pavilion Theatre , Marine Road, Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
01 231 2929‎
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€12/€10

talk
Howard Jacobson and Paul Murray

Mountains to Sea festival aims to impress with their stellar line-up from the first day, when Howard Jacobson, a Man Booker Prize winner, and our own Paul Murray will be in the hotseats. Jacobson is sure to have a story or two, having studied under F.R Leavis at Cambridge and describing himself as 'the Jewish Jane Austen'. If his books such as The Mighty Walzer and Coming from Behind are anything to go by, he'll be a wit and a half, and won't be afraid to put forward an opinion. He will be joined by Paul Murray, author of Skippy Dies, which nailed the D4 pseudo-scumbag scene. Murray must be good, as he was named in the Telegraph's top 20 British novelists under 40. Quite the success, considering he's Irish. Clap on the back for him! / Kate Frances

 

September 04 2012


where
Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay D2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€8/€5

comedy
Tony Law at the Death of Comedy

D.O.C had a “patchy at best” run at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe but that was because the heat of heaving, laughing bodies at their gigs had everyone in the room sweating harder than OJ Simpson under questioning. They've brought a lil' slice of Scotland back with them though, booking Tony Law, madcap surrealist, to headline this evening. Nominated for the Edinburgh comedy award, he will no doubt still be buzzing off his success having been nobly defeated by Dr Brown - a bat-shit crazy, and therefore, by Edinburgh standards, worthy winner. But tonight will be all about Law - prepare yourself for a visit to an alternate universe, where dogs can talk and a Canadian can be the funniest person in a room full of Irishmen. / Frances Winston

 

September 04 2012


where
139 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 1.

when
Regular Hours

how much
€5.40 (Tiger Beer)


Toners Yard

"It looks like the roof fell in on part of the pub and they just carried on" said my mate. And there's no finer tribute to Toner's beer garden. The remnants of a trad pub are carved into the side of an abandoned yard, on a Dutch style land grab nestled at the end of a cul-de-sac. Toner's throws up a few thrilling new vistas. Depending on your seating and angle, you can imagine being under railway tracks or cast adrift in a Berlin outpost. Its no frills paper lanterns, old pub signage, gigantic snooker light style heater and abandoned entrance wreath all add to its careless abandon. I'm not sure of its appeal when the Baggot Street suits descend but for an early week scoop, without the need to yak about street art surrounds, Toners Yard is the fresh shit. Michael McDermott

   
 

September 05 2012


where
KT Contemporary, KT Contemporary, 25–27 Donnybrook Rd, Dublin 4
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
Free

exhibition
The Last Hurrah

It's a sad day. We're saying ciao for now to KT Contemporary. But this seems like a good time to have a nostalgic montage scene about what we saw over this Donnybrook Gallery's life. They took Danleo off the streets, kinda like Nancy was to Oliver Twist, and gave him space in their gallery. And it was good. Mick Minogue went all crafty, as he does, in the window, and, once again, it was good. KT Contemporary knew their shizzlebobizzle. There was the ArtNow show, which blew us away, Enda McNally's (pretty creepy) show which had a man with a potato sack over it's head in the window, and Linda Brownlee's Achill exhibition, which was so good we had to interview her. It is sad, but we say cheers, for all the great art they gave us! / le cool Dublin

 

September 05 2012


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8:30pm

how much
€23.50

gig
Justin Townes Earle

Justin Townes Earle is one of the few modern-day embodiments of Americana. Having received a firm schooling in all things folk and heartland from musician father Steve Earle, he began performing in rock and bluegrass bands during his teens. With an almost Beat-like romanticism, his share of success was marred by recurring addiction and a turbulent personal life. It’s the type of upbringing that whittles a man into a distinctive and prolific personality; that enables a man to hold you in silent awe whilst baring his soul on stage. Having sung the blues up the Harlem River in 2010 (earning an Americana Music Award in the process), Townes Earle has followed the road back to his home state for the Memphis-soul driven Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now. I for one couldn’t agree more with the title. / Jerath Head

 

September 04 2012


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:50pm

how much
€5.20-€8.90

screening
Grizzly Man

We all come up against obstacles in our lives. Rarely do those obstacles weigh hundreds of pounds and possess the ability to rend us in twain. Each summer for thirteen years Timothy Treadwell abandoned human civilization for the simpler, more fundamental, and inevitably fatal tribulations of the Alaskan peninsula. He lived amongst grizzly bears, called them friends and campaigned to ensure their survival. Werner Herzog narrates a tale that while presenting multiple views on the controversial life of the Grizzly Man, tends toward the poetic implications found in similar tales such as those of Thoreau and McCandless. Appropriately cautionary, the documentary nevertheless focuses on a story of immense beauty depicting a man who struggled to define himself in our society, but drew love and inspiration from a life in the wild. / Oscar Knight

 
Tamp & Stitch

Veronica Trevisani, Paul Taylor, and Barry Neil (not pictured) are weaving and brewing a new boutique business for our pleasure.

Paul: I started the coffee side of things. Before 3FE popped up, you couldn't consistently get a nice coffee in Dublin. I approached them over a year ago because I wanted to learn from the best. Now when you come into my space you know you're getting good quality coffee. I love the idea of owner-occupied businesses, but we lost a lot of that local feel during the boom. I’ve also always liked the idea of having two businesses in one, trying to fit multiple interests under one roof.

Veronica: I was running the fashion stage in the Twisted Pepper for a couple of months, gathering together Irish and selected international designers. One of our main focuses is bringing independent brands into Dublin. So the coffee comes from a small roaster in the UK, and I get a really selected collection of items from designers I've actually met.

Tamp & Stitch is open on Essex Street West, in Temple Bar.

PHOTO: Eoin Kirwan