Dublin Selected *173

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Our spiritual leader and le cool founder, Rene, informed us that le cool Barcelona started ten years ago this week.

It got us thinking about the last ten years; the trends that were trumpeted, the fads that faded, and it was reassuring to think that le cool is still relevant and still well received. So, we listed out what we've lost and gained since that Barcelona Issue 001.

We've heard lo-fi and hi-fi, all with the aid of wifi. White, navy and lime have all been the new black. We lost Johnny Cash, Michael Jackson and Whitney, but we gained Frank Ocean. Sienna was the new Kate, Alexa was the new Kate, Cara is the new Kate, but Kate will always be Kate. We moved from Yahoo to Hotmail to Gmail, Bebo to Facebook, Teletext to Twitter.

We realised that the le cool format even predates the iPhone, so stay tuned for plans we have for redevelopement very soon. Enough lostalgia, here's to the next ten years. Feliz Cumpleaños le cool!

Who thinks that trends come and go but good stories will be around forever? Kate Frances, Ciaran, Michael, Amy, Adam or Camille.
"It's an angry woman eating her soup." - Adrien Merigeau
... Read More
   
 

February 21 2013


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€12

gig
Girls Names

Woozy, warped guitar with a spattering of whirring white noise, Girls Names' 2011 debut Dead To Me was well received as the perfect capsule of catchy, sun-kissed tunes. It was surf rock, all the way from Belfast. It felt like the perfect progression from The Long Blondes, who had split three years earlier when Dorian Cox suffered a stroke. A better, more refined product of an equally maligned city, perhaps. That was then and this is now, and Girls Names' 2013 release, The New Life, has relieved itself of the feel-good indie-pop and replaced it with some doom-laden goth pop instead. Like changing a bright Hawaiian shirt for a long Cure coat. The new stuff is undoubtedly darker, dividing itself from joy but is no less for it. It's a seductive must-listen and tonight will be Dublin's gig of the week. / Vernon Steel

 

February 21 2013


where
Vicar Street, 58-59 Thomas Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€25

comedy
Sean Hughes

Despite being born the year he became the youngest recipient of the Perrier Award, I own Sean's Show on clunky VHS, Sean's Tape on chewed up cassette, and Sean's Book, even if my reading skillz were more 'There's a cat on the mat'. Whether it was the misery of his existence in his one bed flat, with only a mouse called Elvis and a damp sock for company, or his attempt at suicide by Morrissey, he had me hooked like a crack whore's babby. His latest show focuses on his relationship with his father, and, if the poem Shaking Cream was anything to go by, it'll be as intense as one of his late-night chats with Samuel Beckett. He coyly avoided Dublin like a troubled lover when touring Ducks And Other Mistakes I've Made, so let's show him that we've gone into therapy and wanna give it another try... Win Tickets / Kate Coleman

   
 

February 21 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10pm

how much
€10

gig
Benga

I was first introduced to Benga’s track Crunked Up, and subsequently dubstep, via a rather sweet mixtape a friend gave me for my birthday. Quite a few years later and dubstep has exploded. Or maybe that should be imploded. Artists like Skrillex and Datsik have fed dubstep through an American filter producing a face-melting, bastardised version called Brostep- aka the death knell for a once well respected, underground genre. Oh and artists like Britney Spears and Taylor Swift ‘doingdubstep didn’t help either. Trust then in Benga; dubstep pioneer, one third of super group Magnetic Man and wobble bass supremist. He’s turned his back on the genre he helped develop, so all ears will be on his second album (imaginatively titled Chapter 2) due out this week. Get an earful of subterranean bass and hear the future of dubstep tonight. Win Tickets / Adam Duxbury

 

February 21 2013


where
Cineworld, Parnell Street, D1
Location Map

when
8:50pm

how much
€11

jdiff
Bernie

Richard Linklater's latest stylistic detour is a true crime piece focusing on the effect a murder has on a small southern town, sort of like a cuddlier version of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood. Like the director's well-loved School of Rock, it's a chance for Jack Black to showcase his often misused talents, and he rises to the occasion with gusto, twinkling his way through the film as the preternaturally cheery mortician with a passion for musical theatre. He's supported by a resurgent Matthew McConaughey (mostly keeping his shirt on these days), and the film's true stars - the local townspeople. Shot in talking head fashion and in some cases playing themselves, their wry commentary on the action offers a uniquely Texan take on crime and punishment and provides the film's funniest moments. / Conor McDevitt

 

February 21 2013


where
Block T, 1-6 Haymarket, Smithfield Square
Location Map

when
Launches tonight, 8pm. Continues until 24th.

how much
Free

exhibition
Top Ten - Selected Works

For the first time, the prestigious Undergraduate Awards have extended to the Visual Arts, and herein lies the Best in Show. Latex House, by 2012 winner Clare Chaney, is seriously impressive. This life size cast of her family home explores themes of ‘ownership’ in modern Ireland. It’s Delicate, a series of highly realistic oil paintings by Jack Hickey, portrays the void and emptiness in modern society and on the designer side, Laura Moran’s Suí Síos street furniture provides some clever solutions with Lamp Seats considerately made in DCC’s favourite shade of blue. With many pieces exploring the sad complexities of modern society, this work shows that while we might be poor in money, we are still rich in talent. / Enya Moore

   
 

February 22 2013


where
Odeon Cinema 
Point Village



when
1.50pm, 5.20pm, 9pm

how much
€10.50

cinema
Cloud Atlas

We don't have the lettercount here to give you the background saga on the making of this sprawling movie version of David Mitchell's novel. Google it. People said it was unfilmable but then the Wachowski siblings tend not to listen to what people say. Between them, and Run Lola Run director Tom Tykwer, they manage to wrangle the unwieldy multi-epoch spanning text into a thoroughly entertaining and engaging film. Themes of freedom, consequence and power echo through its six interwoven tales, but it's best to take these lightly. Focus instead on spotting the lead actors in a variety of surprising guises (is that Hugh Grant as a cannibal war-lord?) and enjoy the ride. This is an audacious, ambitious piece of film-making that should make you wonder at HOW exactly something like this gets made. Let's be glad it did. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

February 22 2013


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€16.50

gig
Darkstar

Darkstar gained renown amongst electrophiles in 2010 with their debut North for its unique blend of melancholic dubstep and experimental ambience. It marked them as a band with a serious future. Yet in somewhat of a counterpoint to that success, they have returned this month with the kaleidoscopic, dreamy-pop sophomore release, News From Nowhere. It signified a ‘progression in style,’ which could well have resulted from acquiring some vintage synths and a handful of hallucinogenic inspiration. The sharp corners and rhythmic structure of their sound have fallen away in favour of a wistful elegance and wonderfully refrained psychedelia that is such a side step from earlier tracks it leaves you with one burning question in anticipation of this gig: will they eschew their old material to cultivate a more vibrant live experience? / Jerath Head

 

February 22 2013


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€15

gig
Ethan Johns (support from SOAK)

Sofia Coppola, Stella McCartney, Ethan Johns - what do they all have in common? They’re all successful children of famous parents! Ethan Johns had big shoes to fill considering that his Da, Glyn Johns, was a producer for the Stones, Led Zeppelin and Eric Clapton. Ethan decided to take up the family calling anyway and did so admirably, going on to produce for Laura Marling, Ray La Montagne and others. But he’s now decided to step out from behind the desk and is touring his new solo album, recorded with help from Marling et al. A delightful slice of blues and rock and folk, there is a raw energy to his music and a creative spirit which should result in one of the best live gigs so far this year. Also as a little added extra, much hyped Derry musician SOAK will be supporting, so total twofer! / Beccy Fitzpatrick

   
 

February 23 2013


where
Exchange Dublin, Exchange Street Upper Temple Bar, Dublin 2.


when
1.30 -5.30pm

how much
Free

launch
Vegan Launch

I have a strict food philosophy, it goes like this: I don’t eat anything that has been animated in a Disney film. Trust me, the house of mouse don’t animate vegetables. As a lifelong vegetarian I feel good, even a little smug, about my low-impact, healthy diet. I like these kinds of facts: it takes 50 baths of water to produce one steak. They make me feel ok about Ryanair flights and long showers. But then there’s vegans. In the broad church of vegetarianism, vegans are the pope and all that cheese, honey and leather I eat/wear are sins I’m reluctant to confess. But I’ll do so at this event, and I would encourage you to do the same. Vegan Ireland are the oracles of pure living, and today they are launching their supporters card at an afternoon of educational titbits. If knowledge is power, then Stephen Hawkins is a tofu steak. / Adam Duxbury

 

February 23 2013


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€20

gig
Ebo Taylor & Odapajan

Oh, hello! Today we’re going to talk about the wonderful world of Afrobeat. Imagine a crazy concoction of jazz, funk, and polyrhythms, combined with traditional African music and revolutionary politics. Yep, it’s just as good as it sounds. Now imagine a grizzled old afro-funk veteran, a renowned guitarist with a band of seasoned pros in tow. Yep, that’s Ebo Taylor. He ain’t some nobody neither - Taylor’s been at the forefront of the Highlife and Afrobeat scenes since long before you were born (apologies to anyone reading born prior to 1962). And as anyone who saw the Mulatu gig last month knows, whenever ChoiceCuts brings over a kick-ass septuagenarian African musical revolutionary, you sit up and take notice! Ditch the skinny-20something-lads-with-haircuts gig options this weekend, and get funky with a king. Win Tickets / Marcus O'Sullivan

 

February 23 2013


where
Mabos, 8 Hanover Quay, Dublin 2


when
8pm

how much
See HERE

party
King Of Ping

I’m expecting this night to connect with me on a deep, familial level. You see my late uncle was a professional table tennis, badminton and squash coach. He was also the author of many luminous tomes like Table Tennis Coaching Manuals: Physical Education Assessment Manual for G.C.S.E. & Key Stages 1-4. I’m basically ping pong rock royalty. I don’t like to brag about it though, mainly ‘cos I’m crap at ping pong. But you might be good, and at this event you can compete for the ‘King of Ping’ title. You can also choose the playlist as four djs bat their styles back and forth on a giant projector. There will be a colossal gameboy, art installations and robot standoffs. You need to buy membership, but it’s BYOB so you’ll save $$$s at the (non) bar and you might win €50 with the mad ball skills you suddenly develop after 19 bottles of Sol. /Adam Duxbury

   
 

February 23 2013


where
Kennedy's (The Underground), Westland Row, Dublin 2

Location Map

when
11pm

how much
€8

club night
Orange

Anything that lists “pussy power...and alter egos” all in the same night has got my vote. The word "Queer" has been getting bandied around quite a lot of late, from Sara Keating to Joe Duffy to offended panto-dames. But as a dancer once said; "If I could explain it in words then why would I dance it?" Or something like that. If you want to know what queer means bust a move with these folk and you'll understand. With a dream-team set up comprising the Gramophone Disco crew and DJ PCP guesting alongside Das DJ, this is a fail-safe night that will provide exactly what it says on the tin – dark, dirty and sweaty dancing. / Roisin Agnew

 

February 23 2013


where
Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay D2
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€13

gig
Mazes

In their short four-year existence, Mancunian band Mazes have managed to release five albums that collectively amount to over 80 tracks of aural delight. Granted they have a long way to go if they aspire to the prolific achievements of legendary Jamaican duo Sly and Robbie, who have an astounding 200,000 tracks on record, that’s still a frickin’ mental achievement. This year’s Ores and Minerals is a collection of tape-soaked guitars and groovy beats varnished with catchy vocals that bring to mind the harmonies of a ‘less glam more lo-fi’ Marc Bolan. The band’s recording ethos includes a firm middle finger to the click track that brings back the live groove of a bygone era. Fans of Tame Impala be alert, Mazes are your northern hemisphere answer to all the analogue glory of the Aussie psychedelic rockers, but without the LSD.  / Battle

 

February 23 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

jdiff
Museum Hours

Jem Cohen is everything Andy Warhol wanted to be - a film-maker worthy of The Whitney. Lost Book Found is the perfect introduction to his lo-fi approach, a kind of wandering chronicle of New York's concrete monkey jungle. He translates this to Vienna in his latest feature Museum Hours, where he waltzes through the tale of an unlikely friendship forged in impossibly sumptuous surroundings with a deft subtlety, seducing the audience with his attention to setting and simplicity of approach. With a veritable sweetie jar of notable admirers (oh hey, Patti Smith, exec. producer) probably more than willing to do his bidding, Cohen retains this kind of lone wolf, one-man-and-a-camera feel to what he records, making it feel intimate, or even kind of snoopy. He'll be linked up by Skype after the screening to talk to the pack. Win Tickets / Cora Burke

 

February 23 2013


where
All over Stoneybatter.

when
1pm - 11pm

how much
Free

celebration
Cowtown

A gallery room packed full of dark rich earth. The crazed sound of an avant-garde Japanese musician. The first ever gig by Donal Dineen's Parish. The story of the Joinery on Arbour Hill is studded with precious moments, and this Saturday promises more incidents to treasure too as the gallery/venue spreads its wings across Stoneybatter, teaming up with local artists for a day of events called Cowtown: one of the Batter's many nicknames, after Europe's largest cattle market which once stood on the NCR. Beyond the Joinery, nearby Lilliput Press hosts readings, and Cian Nugent, Si Schroeder & Valerie Francis are home invading by playing gigs in local houses. D7’s burgeoning food scene are representing too: free coffee @ Lilliput, free beer in Drinkstore, nibbles in L.Mulligans and €2.50 pints of plain in Walsh's. Tasty.... / Luke McManus

   
 

February 24 2013


where
The Light House Cinema, Market Square, Smithfield, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
1pm

how much
€7.50 / 6

cinema
Mea Maxima Culpa

With the unprecedented resignation of Pope Benedict XVI last week, the release of Alex Gibney's new documentary, Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, could not be timelier. A devastating indictment of an institution mired in controversy and steeped in secrecy, the film is a comprehensive excavation of an abuse scandal that spanned decades and continents, and tarnished the once-infallible Catholic Church. Using the moving testimony of four deaf sexual abuse survivors as a launch pad, Gibney investigates the manner in which the Vatican dealt with allegations and uncovers unsettling truths about what leading church figures knew, despite their protestations to the contrary. Eye-opening and skillfully made, Mea Maxima Culpa will enrage and enlighten, provoke and perturb. Essential viewing for all. / Amy O’Connor

 

February 24 2013


where
Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Feb. 22nd - 24th. 6pm/ 6.30pm

how much
€5

performance
In Rainbows

To fly! The dream of man and flightless bird alike. It's a dream Emily Aoibheann has made a reality with aerial performance group, Paper Dolls. Now she takes to the skies once again with In Rainbows, a collaborative aerial silk and vocal installation. The show transforms Smock Alley, bringing action to every level by combining aerial works and vocals to saturate spectators in sensation, surrounding the audience with colour, sound and music. Most of all it harnesses our awe as these aerial performers, like birds, make that most unattainable human desire a reality, gliding and spinning above us. It’s a jaw-dropping envy-inducing display that will have you day-dreaming about running away to join the circus. Or at least flying a kite. / Kate McEvoy

   
 

February 25 2013


where
6 Crow Street
Temple Bar
Dublin 2


when
Mon-Wed, 12-6. Thurs 12-8. Fri/Sat, 12-7.

how much
€19.95 to €85

le other
Casa Rebelde

Maggie Thatcher's crackdown on football hooligans indirectly inspired the exotic, early '80s "Casual" - young, working class fans of Liverpool, Everton and Chelsea who ditched their colours and disguised themselves in (shop-lifted) designer sportswear. Football, politics and street culture crossed-over for the first time, a heritage celebrated in one of Dublin's more niche fashion outlets, Casa Rebelde. Counter-culture clubs such as Hamburg's kult-klub St Pauli FC and the fervently Basque Athletic Bilbao are celebrated in retro-shirts and scarves while images of maverick idols including Johan Cruyff and afro'ed Marxist Paul Breitner abound. Retro, right-on and aimed squarely at those who like a bit of politics and fashion with their football, Casa Rebelde caters for discerning football fans who instinctively hug the left-wing. / Josef O'Shea

 

February 25 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
4.30pm/ 6.30pm

how much
€8.50 - €9.90

cinema
Fire in the Blood

Billed as a tale of 'medicine, monopoly and malice', Fire in the Blood tells the story of how western pharmaceutical companies blocked access to low-cost AIDS drugs for people in the developing world. The filmmakers are keen to push this one as the story of (in their words) the crime of the century and not for it to be seen as an issues film. In terms of its documentary contemporaries expect something a little more like Inside Job as opposed to The Corporation. Given Ireland's green light for funding for Cystic Fibrosis drug, Kalydeco, the timing of this release could not be more pertinent. It's a tale of how drug research funded by public money is controlled by monopolies extolling their own agenda and the devastating consequences that follow. / David Cadwallader

   
 

February 26 2013


where
Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
9pm

how much
€10/ €12

theatre
Katie Mag

Katie Mag, written by Jennifer Rogers, explores the consequences of a dramatic event in the lives of friends Katie and Mag. Katie is a meek outsider who forms a connection with the ambitious and extroverted Mag. The former is captivated and emboldened by the latter’s persona, however, when the nature of their friendship is tested, issues of blame, responsibility and inter-personal dynamics arise. This shift forces Katie to examine her feelings about the relationship and face issues from her past. Rogers' writing style is poetic and fluid, an approach she uses in Katie Mag to explore themes of friendship and the related trouble and confusion of mixed emotions. Roundhouse Productions explore the response to such personal experiences to create “innovative dramatic” theatre which engages and inspires audiences nationwide. Win Tickets / Ruth Hurl

 

February 26 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
Free. See HERE

talk
It's A Man's World

“It’s a man’s world,” according to James Brown and the majority of statistical evidence. Funny thing is, it’s mostly women who talk about this state of affairs (while talking about everything else too). So it shouldn’t be much of a surprise that the inspiration for this most recent Banter event, a panel of men talking about men’s issues, comes from Banter’s successful Anti Room podcast last year. Yet this is a discussion that’s long overdue. Feminism often facilitates discussion about what it means to be a woman and the various issues that entails, yet “guy stuff” often remains unexamined, and, as they say; an unexamined life is not worth living. Banter has moved to right this wrong by assembling a diverse male panel to take about the business of being a dude and why we need to ask these questions. Sharing is caring after all. / Kate McEvoy

   
 

February 27 2013


where
Powerscourt Shopping Centre, 59 William Street South, D2
Location Map

when
Until March 1st

how much
Free

exhibition
Eleanor McCaughey - The How and Why Library

Eleanor McCaughey’s paintings are of the the kind where sketched lines and dripping paint melt into highly skilled portrayals of people. The kind I like a lot. What is even more likeable than her techniques is her ability to inspire intrigue using muted tones and colours; she creates scenes that really make you want to know what is going on. The How and Why Library is the first of a series of pop-ups to coincide with the newly launched Powerscourt online Gallery. In the title, as in her work, McCaughey references the Childcraft Encyclopaedias that frequented many bookshelves, including her own. The series is a response to the loss of her childhood home using imagery and illustrations from the books as symbols of the past, revisited in the present. / Enya Moore

 
CoisCeim's Pageant

le cool dances with choreographers David Bolger and Muirne Bloomer ahead of their world premiere, Pageant.

CoisCéim are eighteen years old this year. The show we’re premiering is a piece called Pageant, choreographed by myself and Muirne Bloomer. Both of us have made big spectacles for the opening ceremony of the Special Olympics and the Ryder Cup, which involved hundreds of people.

One of the things I really wanted to work on was this idea of the everyday - is it automatic? Are we on autopilot? Do we go through our lives in an everyday way or do we take in things?

We started to really work with the dancers on the sense of their community. They’re representing this notion of the everyday and daily rituals and routines. This show is set as two choreographers planning a pageant. It’s almost a pageant within a pageant.

The title is quite a big title, even though it’s just one word. For a while, I thought it was really old and thought of strolling minstrel players, but now ‘pageant’, to me, seems to live. 

CoisCéim's new show Pageant runs in Project Arts Centre from February 23rd through March 2nd. PHOTO: seanandyvette