Dublin Selected *186

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Summer, summer, summertime. Time to sit back and unwind. We're welcoming back the plinky-plonk music of the ice cream van, farmers' tans and flip-flops, man. 

Come Friday, we'll be released from our offices...The barbecue will emerge from underneath the still-damp tarpaulin, and we'll ring relatives in Australia who'll say "Sure, when the sun is out, there's no better place in the world."

As we have little-to-no 'man make fire' skill, you'll probably find us at Forbidden Fruit, where the history of the Royal Hospital, aura of IMMA and bad-boy musicians collide, while groovsters shake a limb in solidarity with great music.

And isn't it the solidarity that really counts? Sharing your last cigarette with a stranger cos you like the same band, helping the spacially unaware with their tents, or finding the Mystic Meg who was smart enough to pack painkillers?

But while you're mulling that over, what will we be listening to this summer? Well, as no one asked, here is summer playlist:

What did we miss?

Who's tooting on the summer horn this week? Kate, Ciaran, Michael, Amy or Kristen.

"I think I need to knit him a hat." - Nicky Hooper
... Read More
   
 

May 30 2013


where
National Gallery of Ireland, Merrion Sq W & Clare St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
Free

theatre
8x10: Plays Inspired by Paintings

Isn’t “making art come alive (!)” the advertising hook for just about every gallery with a passable to poor marketing department universally? Perhaps so, but the National Gallery is paying far more than lip service to the overused idiom in its current collaboration with eight Irish playwrights under the working title of Pavilion Playwrights. The dramatizations, which will be performed in rehearsed readings, reanimate eight of the gallery’s most exciting works, enlivening Caravaggio’s The Taking of Christ, reuniting the secret lovers of Burton’s The Meeting on the Turret Stairs, and rousing Uccello’s Virgin and Child from the frame of its cracking canvas among others—a theatrical cut above the average white cube’s interpretative wall label. / Kristen Pye

 

May 30 2013


where
84.5 Capel Street,
(where Capel St. meets North King Street)
Dublin 1


when
Doors open at 7pm

how much
Depends on craft beer...

launch
Beerhouse

In light of the current Irish internet fad of turning every piece of content into a 'top five' list. Here are the top five worst named pubs in Dublin: 1. Larry Murphy's (Baggot St) - Sharing your name with a convicted rapist and suspected serial killer is, admittedly, unfortunate. 2. Chaplin's (Hawkins St.) - Naming your pub after a comic actor icon is fine if the atmosphere on premises can match his mirth, alas this pub is often, much like Charlie's movies, silent. 3. Howl At The Moon (Mount St.) - Should be named 'Cash in the Attic: The Liberace Special'. 4. The Bar With No Name (Fade St.) - Unforgivable lack of imagination. 5. The Hairy Lemon (Lower Stephen St.) - Sounds like a euphemism for a reproductive organ. Thank heavens then for Beerhouse. Simply, direct and launching tonight. / Vernon Steel

 

May 30 2013


where
Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
Gates 7pm. Film 10pm

how much
€5

screening/live soundtrack
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

The slightest hint of sun sends us into a tizzy of glee. The balmy Soul Festival helped us crack out our farmer's tan line and now we're planning on wearing no socks. Of course, we're victims of the sun-blinked optimism of three cloudless days on the trot. It's all going to be better, sunnier, sweeter. Right? Open Air Cinema seizes upon that chink of blue-sky thinking. Crack open a screening, fire up the social media machine and emit subliminal fomo rays which will lead our loafers  with cans in hand (him) and floral combos with blankets trailing (her). Tonight 3epkano perform a live score to The Cabinet of Dr Caligari,  a black and white expressionist masterpiece of madness, murder and theatrical sets. Win Tickets / Zach Joyce
 

May 29 2013


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
9pm (Tower Records 7pm)

how much
Free before 10:30pm

dj set
Zebra with Nanu Nanu

Laura Sheeran and Marc Aubele’s Nanu Nanu project embraces dressing up and alteregos.  Calling themselves Glitterface and Mirrorman respectively, they are musicians who make “Alien-Pop” music. Unit One is the duo’s debut album and it perfectly encapsulates that tag. The ten tracks conjure up music made in the future, or at least, the hopeful sound of what music will sound like some time away from the present. It’s an album with experimental flavours, featuring songs that are electronic in vein, which touch on coldwave synthesizer sounds, industrial tones, synthetically-altered vocals, electro flourishes and dark-edged rhythms. There are two opportunities to catch them live today so there’s no excuse to get whisked away into the glam-electro pop future. / Nialler9
 

May 30 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
4:30pm

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
My Neighbour Totoro

There's a good chance you might recognise Totoro even if you have never seen any of animation maestro Hayao Miyazaki's films. He's that big furry grey creature who hangs around in the forest with his soot sprites and the Cat Bus. Trust me, this is cinematic perfection. Hand-animated in an age before CGI, it's a wonderful film that doesn’t concern itself much with good vs evil, or right and wrong, but rather a study of childhood wonder and experience. It is a benign tale of enchantment and otherworldly characters, seen through the eyes of two very life-like sisters, to the backdrop of a series of family emergencies. Oh, by the way, should you ever find yourself in Tokyo, a visit to the Ghibli Museum is a must. The wonderment and sense of awe found there could be the closest thing to feeling like a kid again. / Simon Judge

   
 

May 31 2013


where
16 Aungier St.
Dublin 2

when
Monday - Sunday, see link.

how much
Depends...


The Whitefriar Grill

Let's get one thing straight, we're not talking Fade Street Social here. You won't find pods of suburban breeders craning their necks for a sighting of Kathryn Thomas while they mistake the term cosmopolitan for a drink. This is a good thing. The Whitefriar Grill serves broad-shouldered, flavour-driven food, dishes that are always in the service of their ingredients. Bone marrow is served with a zippy salsa verde and an oxtail marmalade redolent of the business end of a bullock. A deeply flavoured Cote de Boeuf for two arrives topped with sweet prawns from the plancha. We sluiced these down with an excellent, well priced 'Rondan' Rioja. Their burger is one of the best in town, their brunch almost certainly is. The room is spare and handsome, the front of house guys charming. Service can tend toward the leisurely. You won't care. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

May 30 2013


where
Unitarian Church, St Stephen's Green West, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€12

gig
Colleen

It has been over six years since Cécile Schott (Colleen) released her last record; in that time she moved to San Sebastián, began to learn sculpture and ceramics, and took a long break from both listening to, and making, music. It is through this reimagining that this year's The Weighing of the Heart has emerged. Although it shares some common ground with the spare beauty of previous records such as 2003's Everyone Alive Wants Answers, The Golden Morning Breaks (2005), and Les Ondes Silencieuses (2007) it is a deeper exploration of the nature of joy, and the frailty of life. With a greater focus on percussion, and the debut of Schott's haunting vocal, the album is one of intelligent, yearning grace, words that could also describe Seti the First's music, who will be supporting her on the night. Win TicketsSiobhán Kane

 

May 31 2013


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
10:45pm

how much
€6-€9

screening
The Breakfast Club

A typical 80s film has to have a certain number of features, an inexplicable choreographed dance sequence, Molly Ringwald preferably wearing something pink, and the name John Hughes attached to it somewhere. The Breakfast Club, undoubtedly one of the classics of 80s cinema features all of the above. The film explores the experiences of five stereotypical high school students stuck in Saturday morning detention. How will the popular girl, jock, geek, rebel and outcast pass the time? By defying the principal, teasing each other and making their dandruff look like snow. However, the group inevitably share their fears and insecurities and bond over the pressure of fulfilling their social roles realising that underneath the labels they are all the same. Don’t worry Emilio, everyone’s “old man” wanted them to “win, win, win”. / Ruth Hurl

   
 

May 31 2013


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€12

performance
Public Service Broadcasting

Some words call for good old-fashioned Received Pronunciation. The likes of 'spiffing', 'jolly' and 'rather' all benefit from a nasal dollop of RP. What you don't expect is for these words, within their respective news reels and wartime propaganda snippets, to team up with a London duo and get a musical outing. With their aim to 'teach the lessons of the past through the music of the future', top chaps J. Willgoose Esq. and Wrigglesworth inject British stiff-upper-lippery in to tunes spanning the Kraftwerk-esque to amped-up belters. As modern accompaniments to the vocal ghosts of public information films, the songs are utterly compelling. With their live shows a visual as well as aural spectacle, the pair weave archive footage into their performance to mesmerising effect. Miss this and you'll miss a bloody good show, old chum. / Sarah Folan

 

May 31 2013


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
€6-€9

cinema
Populaire

Romain Duris won my knickers, but certainly not my heart, in the cinematic abomination that was Heartbreaker. He returns in this candyfloss fifties flick, with charming young Hepburn-alike Deborah Francois. The story of a somewhat directionless employer in need of an Eliza Doolittle 'project' and a parochial young lady looking to live the dream in the big city (er, town), Populaire follows said project as she attempts to succeed in the glamorous (and cutthroat) world of typewriting. It is gelato-hued with glossy typewriters, innocent love, and naivete abound. The simple, silly premise, despite being lighter than crepe paper, is charming and finely crafted. It doesn't feel overly contrived in its golden-age Hollywood pretensions because the modern edge, feisty but flailing heroine and sheer intent elevate it to a higher place. / Cora Burke

 

May 31 2013


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
11pm

how much
€8

party
Nialler 9's Forbidden Fruit Opening Party

Let’s be frank, bands that play at launch parties are usually from the ‘Who the hell are they?’ musical filing cabinet and as a person who can’t even find the pulse to put my finger on it, most can be filed under that heading. Luckily, Nialler9 is pushing the buttons tonight, so it’s with a good deal of anticipation that I’ll be trotting down for the launch party of that now very Dublin festival, Forbidden Fruit. After that day spent queuing hours for a beverage, the FF people got their act together and it’s rapidly becoming a must-go event on the capitals calendar. Tonight, it’s disco, with the UK’s Gramme, Ireland’s SHIPS and TR-One flying the flag. Hot Chip have name checked Gramme as an early influence. Frankly, they should probably be in the ‘what do you mean you don’t know Gramme?’ category. Well, let’s find out. Win Tickets / Hugh Torpey

   
 

June 01 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10:30pm

how much
€14

gig
Analogue Cops

Digital downloaders need not read on, at least that’s the attitude of Marieu and Lucretio, Germany’s experimental techno answer to SOPA or better known as the Analogue Cops. Okay, so they won’t actually lock you up for embracing today’s technologies, but they certainly are persistent purveyors of all things vinyl, along with remaining completely adamant of using only analogue hardware at their lives shows, a trait which makes any Analogue Cops gig an absolute treat for those inclined to the old school. Chicago house, funk, disco and jazz have been just some of the subtle elements that make up the duo’s own personal brand of traditional techno. Support comes from the ever rising and top lad Lee Kelly fresh from multiple sets at Life festival, along with the always reliable DJ Kormac AV set. / Philip Notaro

 

June 01 2013


where
The Gaiety Theatre, 46 King St S, D2
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€22-€40

theatre
Birdsong

Clearly Rachel Wagstaff has a lot of moxy as it takes a brave person to adapt a novel as beloved as Sebastian Faulk's Birdsong. Thankfully she also has an enduring love of the book and sticks faithfully to it’s themes within the restrictions of a stage setting. Although the story is set in and around the Battle of the Somme it still strikes a chord with audiences as it’s themes of love and loss are universal. Using a claustrophobic bunker in France as the main location the cast cleverly create the world of the play, which is set over several years, and completely suck you in to the doomed love story of weary soldier Stephen and the beautiful married Isabelle. Completely captivating and with some fantastic performances this serves as a moving reminder of the suffering endured during this brutal period in history. / Frances Winston

 

June 01 2013


where
Graphic Studio Gallery, Through the Arch, off Cope Street, Temple Bar, D2
Location Map

when
Until June 1st

how much
Free

exhibition
Surreal Estate

In her latest exhibition Surreal Estate, Naimh McGuinne has been peaking through windows to examine their function as portholes into spaces occupied and abandoned. Exploring themes of dereliction and abandonment, McGuinne’s installation challenges viewers to consider what a glimpse into the interiors of their space would reveal to an outsider looking in: what debris, physical or emotional, from a room’s occupants present and past, survives in the cracks between floorboards? What secrets are there to be found? Hanging 22 metal boxes from the ceiling of Graphic Studio Gallery, printed with images of unoccupied rooms, McGuinne’s installation forces the question: “is a room once lived in ever truly empty again?” / Kristen Pye

   
 

June 02 2013


where
Royal Hospital,
Kilmainham,
Dublin 8



when
June Bank Holiday weekend

how much
€54.50 / €99.50

festival
Forbidden Fruit

Like a good bottle of Calvados, festivals may also become increasingly developed and refined with age. Now in its third year, FF is entering an optimum stage of maturity and judging by this year’s line-up is more consumable than ever - managing to cater for all discerning palates. The country’s largest and only scobie-free cider party, more hedonistic shenanigans are expected to go down in this orchard of tunes and laughs than the combined efforts of Adam, Eve and the dodgy snake in Eden. Sunday looks like the strongest of the two days with disco fiends Chic and Primal Scream headlining whilst indigenous acts including Trinity Orchestra look the pick of the crop on Saturday. For those looking to start proceedings earlier than that, Nialler9’s opening party on Friday looks like the place to get the ball rolling… / Aaron Purcell

 

June 02 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10:30pm

how much
€18

gig
Green Velvet AKA Cajmere

When you turned six, did a messianic figure with a green mohawk come to your birthday party to rant over raging techno beats infused with Chicago soul about his hallucinatory drug trips and molecular reincarnation fantasies? Yeah, that’s why nobody came, loser. Subject Events are cooler than you though, and that’s why Green Velvet is playing theirs. They’ve booked more techno for Saturday, and there’s even an after-party on Monday morn, but the highlight of the weekend has gotta be Green Velvet. There’s something magical about the way his productions are infused with so much of his personality, while operating in a genre that is by its very nature impersonal and machine-like. His music crackles with such a weird, manic energy- it’s propulsive in the extreme and dangerously unhinged. / Marcus O'Sullivan

 

June 02 2013


where
Earlsfort Terrace,


when
Until September 1st

how much
Free

exhibition/screening
Secretion

Filmed in the mossy woodland of Kassel, Germany, Willie Doherty’s short film Secretion plays as a new age tale from the Brothers Grimm, the duo who first brought notoriety to the landscape with their 19th-century tales of dark folly. Narrating within his predecessors’ gloomy tradition, Doherty recounts a narrative of death and disease against the high-res nature images we’re used to seeing accompanied by Richard Attenborough’s gentle basso. Not so here. We learn that the trees in the Kassel forest are dying and investigators can’t determine why. The answer comes through in the sinister story of a former Nazi guard and the history he buried at the end of the war. But nature is not subject to the historical amnesia of society, a truth Doherty’s latest work reveals in haunting prose. / Kristen Pye

   
 

June 03 2013


where
Urban Farm,
26 Kings Inns Street,
Dublin 1

when
Depends

how much
Free

tour
Urban Farm

A farm on the roof of a chocolate factory. A fantastical combination that sounds like something from a fairytale, and in a way it is. Andrew Douglas and Paddy O'Kearney, the evangelists behind Urban Farm are hell bent on creating a utopia of sorts. Their HQ on the roof of 26 Kings Inns is a reimagined garden of Eden for the post-lapsarian age. This is no mere lofty allotment, but rather an innovative experiment in horticulture and urban regeneration with the mission of creating real social change. Aquaponic systems grow fish and food in an ingenious closed loop system. Waste from city cafés is converted to compost with the help of the resident chucks. Every pot, bed and coop is built on-site from discarded materials. Take the tour and prepare to be converted. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

   
 

June 04 2013


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€16-€22

theatre
Man of Valour

We all have our demons but in Farrell Blinks’s case, those demons are alive, kicking and hell-bent on destroying the life force that feeds them. Dragged down by life’s drudgery, his office job under threat and social life confined to video games, Farrell’s rat race existence, tempered only by his fantastical imagination, takes another turn for the worse when he receives an unexpected parcel in the post. The set and lighting by Aedin Cosgrove, video projection by Jack Phelan and Denis Clohessy’s music all play integral roles in Michael West’s Man of Valour but it’s the astonishingly physical and emotionally demanding performance by Paul Reid that has the audience on their feet at the end. By turns hilarious and heart-wrenching, Reid’s half action-man, half tragic-hero escapades through the darker side of his psyche is unmissable. / Brian Keane

 

June 04 2013


where
The Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
Free

screening
The Big Lebowski & The Job

Imagine how difficult it must be to fund and promote a film if you’re an Irish director who isn’t called Neil, especially when multi-millionaires are taking to Kickstarter. But austerity promotes innovative thinking, so kudos to the Workmen’s Den Cinema Club for using a marquee title to promote smaller, shorter productions. The first of (hopefully) many, will get you in the door to see Irish short The Job by dangling the carrot of the 90s comedy classic The Big Lebowski; the film that started a religion and countless student impressions. For those of you who have already seen it, no motivation is needed for this event and for those of you who haven’t (yes both of you) you should come and see what all the fuss is about. There’s even a 2-for-1 offer on White Russians; which will make sense once you’ve seen the film. / David Cadwallader

   
 

June 05 2013


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
3:30pm, 8:30pm

how much
€6-€9

screening
Sixteen Candles

Ah Molly Ringwald, the holy grail of iconic red heads. Without whom I would never have learned that skilful 80s dance using all my limbs. Sadly, it's not all dance moves on easy street, especially for Molly’s character Sam. I mean, it’s her birthday! And she’s a teenager! And everyone forgot her birthday! Gosh, being a teen is really hard. Thankfully, John Hughes took all the angst, plucked the romantic wishes from the minds of thousands of pubescent girls about kissing boys and birthday cakes, only to mesh them together creating an incredibly fun series of ‘I wish that was my life’ movie moments. Granted, it's not exactly hard hitting but this film is full of emotions that our adolescent selves fully identified with. If characters translate through generations just like this, you know it's a movie classic. / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

 

June 05 2013


where
Gaiety Theatre, South King Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€25-€60

opera
La Traviata

Verdi’s classic tale of tragic lovers tells the story of Violetta a TB stricken courtesan whose aloof heart is awakened to the torment and desire of love by nobleman Alfredo’s sincere declarations and humble devotion. The Lyric Opera production stars Italian tenor Luigi Boccia and Irish opera star Claudia Boyle as the lovers who embark on an ill fated romance, one which sees Violetta demonstrate the selfless power of love in order to save Alfredo and his family from social humiliation. These themes of sacrifice, love and morality are set to a grand, evocative score that includes possibly one of the most beautiful odes to drinking ever created. Indeed you will probably be singing Let’s Drink from the Joyful Cup in the pub afterwards in an attempt to recover from witnessing the plight of this fallen woman. / Ruth Hurl

 
Bunsen Burger

He's experimented with most every variation of burger and he's studied under Heston Blumenthal. Now, Tom Gleeson brings the perfectly simple burger to Dublin. 

I lived in New York for a year and my fundamental frustration came from that if you go into any pub in New York, you’re going to get a brilliant burger no matter how bad the bar. I wondered why I couldn’t get that in Ireland, that quality burger here.

I tested every breed of beef and every part of the animal in every ratio I could to get the best possible one. The breed I settled on was Black Aberdeen Angus, which has always had a good reputation. As for the bun, I wanted to get back to that classic American hamburger bun and the best thing I could find was an Amish dinner roll. I refined it myself for ages and then brought it to a baker to get to the final product.

Everything has been analyzed down to the core. We went through 50 kinds of cheese to get the right type. Everything is exceptionally high quality. And we’re also playing around with two vegetarian recipes, so everyone’s happy.

Bunsen Burger opens Monday at 27 Wexford Street. Photo & Interview: Kristen Pye