Dublin Selected *190

If you can't read this email, Click here! | Click here to unsubscribe from this newsletter




   
 
 
We've come a long way since the first recorded coffee shop operated in Dublin - Cock Coffee House on Cook Street (1660-85). And though Dublin has had coffee for 300-odd years, it's really only in the past few that we've fostered a bean-scene worthy of international buzz.

Why? 'Cause everything is just right, conditions are perfect. Our tap water quality is the envy of New York, London and Paris and Irish milk is seen internationally as a premium product. That, coupled with our new found fad of recreational tasting, makes it fair to say that, yes, it's business time.

In this, our Coffee Issue and accompanying video - Le Cool's Guide To Coffee Culture - we put forward the argument that Dublin has the opportunity to be one of the world's best coffee cities. With the World Championships coming here in 2016 we've got the time, the enthusiasm and the focus on quality to make Dublin famous for a different type of black stuff.

This issue is dedicated to all those out there who have pioneered, fostered and developed Dublin's coffee culture - thanks a latte.

Who is looking forward to the daily grind this week? Ciaran, Michael, Kate, Amy or Kayla.
"We wanted to illustrate coffee's effects."- Conor & David
... Read More
   
 

June 27 2013


where
South Studios, 27 New Row South, Dublin 8
Location Map

when
Doors 7pm, Show 7:45/8pm

how much
€10

comedy
Pop-Up Stand-Up

Aren't you eternally jealous of people who can say "I saw The Mighty Boosh at the Hen and Chickens before they even had a radio show" We are. FOMO.'s Kate and Amy, graduates of the school of Le Cool, are bringing over UK comic Adam Hess, Chortle Student Comedy champ, and putting him on a bill with our own fresh talents Foil, Arms and Hog, Conor O'Toole, and MC Al Porter. Surrealism, innuendo, and broken ribs will be the order of the day. With few opportunities to see British and Irish acts mingle outside of Vicar Street, it seemed like the perfect time to all jump into bed together for some funny lovin'. They've also got Jameson on board to set up a complimentary bar, so, with that on top of the BYOB policy, if you don't end up recounting the night to your mates, you can only blame yourself. Win Tickets / le cool Dublin

 

June 27 2013


where
32/34 Lower Grand Canal St., Dublin 2

when
Mon - Sun: 8am - 5pm // 10am-5pm

how much
Prices range from €3 to €8 per cup.

coffee
3fe

3FE's story is Colin Harmon's story. Their bios intertwine like the logo above the shop on Grand Canal Street. It's also the story of Dublin's current coffee flourish. Colin quit a lucrative career in finance to pursue a coffee dream, and while he may have sleep walked into it, he's coming to at the right place and the right time. By dint of dedication and hard work Harmon has realised success and raised the coffee bar of everyone else in the city. His coffee is pretty kick ass to boot. Talk to him or his staff for any length of time and you can't but be infected by their passion for coffee, their positive attitude and their willingness to put Dublin on the international coffee map. It's about always striving for better and not settling on latte'd laurels. 3FE will soon to open their own roasting house too. Watch this space. / Vernon Steel

 

June 27 2013


where
Unit 3 Scarlet Row,
Essex Street West,
Temple Bar,
Dublin 8


when
6pm (Gruel Guerilla)

how much
€12

coffee
Tamp & Stitch

Tamp & Stitch is our kind of joint. Friends Veronica Trevisani, Neil Barry and Paul Taylor bravely set up shop in The Old City over a year ago and have steadily built a loyal following for their bitchin brew. Beans are from independent roasters, and every cup of joe is served with a side of chat about blends and tasting notes. Their enthusiasm is genuine and infectious. While they make your flat white you can browse Veronica's beautifully curated selection of jewelry and clothing that you won't find anywhere else. It strikes a nice balance between the po-faced bean counters of the 'new wave' and the gurning counter 'culture' of the faceless chains. (Tonight Tamp & Sitch play host to the third Gruel Guerilla event - Meatballs and Margaritas) / Mr & Mrs Stevens

   
 

June 27 2013


where
Gallery of Photography, Meeting House Square, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until 11 August

how much
Free

exhibition
Uncertain State

This weekend sees the inaugural Temple Bar Photography Summer School take place in the environs of Meeting House Square. A series of talks and workshops exploring how photographers are addressing this period of instability and crisis is complemented by a group show on the same theme at the Gallery of Photography. Within this ingenious camera-shaped space, work from 10 photographers ranges from the personal to the political. Doug Dubois' work is particularly arresting, set in a small ante-room, his adolescent subjects larger than life. Green field sites, reclaimed by nature from the developer's concrete, are captured in EoinConaill's meditative work. Subjects including asylum, abuse, mental illness, Fenians and Orangemen - this is serious stuff. Seriously good. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

June 27 2013


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€15

gig
Rhob Cunningham & Decidedly Special Guests

I last saw Rhob supporting Maeve Higgins in Whelan's. She took to the stage with a typically self-depreciating apology "I always feel bad following Rhob cos he's so handsome and talented. I'm a bit of a let down." Of course she wasn't, she was a hoot. Fear not Maeve, we did) but this is about Rhob, and Ms Higgins is correct, he is in possession of both some serious skills & pleasing facial features as well as a hatful of harmonious tunes and a good line in the funnies department. If club bangers are your thing look elsewhere, but if carefully crafted, superior singer-songwriter schtick is your bag then you are in luck. Having toured with a who's who of the Irish scene - Villagers, James Vincent McMorrow and Lisa Hannigan to name a few, the promise of some Decidedly Special Guests is very tantalizing indeed. / Kate McEvoy

 

June 27 2013


where
Clement and Pekoe, 50 South William Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8am - 7pm

how much
€2.50 (Indonesian Sulawesi on filter)

le other
Clement & Pekoe

Listen, teabaggers, you're doing it wrong. Did you know that when you brew from the bag, you end up drinking dust and some rather lewd sounding molecules called fannings? Teabags also suck up more essential oils than a '94 Fiat Cinquecento. Clement & Pekoe has been at the forefront of the Dublin loose-leaf tea renaissance since 2008, harking back to the heady days of caddies stuffed with Ceylon blend that got the country hooked on the red stuff. C&P has teas for all seasons, brewing tips for beginners, top coffee, light-as-air cakes, and, most importantly, outdoor benches you can scope out Faye Dinsmore from while scouring the papers. They've been keeping their connoisseur cousins stocked up too (you can find C&P teas in Indigo&Cloth, 3FE and the Science Gallery); but nothing beats the original. / Earl 'Daniel' Gray

   
 

June 28 2013


where
Fumbally Lane
Dublin 8

when
8am-5pm

how much
Long Black - €2.40

coffee
The Fumbally

What did we do before The Fumbally? Where did the young, creative, asymmetrical coiffed, tattooed, Mac carrying hipsterati (and David O'Doherty) go to eat, to drink, to see and to be seen? If I'm honest, I struggled to see how a space on Clanbrassil Street could be a D8 local focus point. But then I don't have the vision of Aisling Rogerson and Luca D'Alfonso. For, exactly a year ago, they opened a vast and beautifully simple space, and the customers came, and kept coming. And though food takes priority in The Fumbally, coffee is a serious matter. Ginger Barista Ger, the all-smiling one behind the counter, knows his pours and doesn't go in for that fancy creme art shite. It's great coffee, served well and keeps you suitably alert for the wave after wave of eye candy in there.  / Vernon Steel

 

June 28 2013


where
Cross Gallery, 59 Francis Street, Dublin 8
Location Map

when
Weds - Fri, 10.30am - 5pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Biopredation

This show centers around our love of books, love of technology, changing times, unchanging themes, possession, belonging, narratives. Brendan Fox, the artist, has been asking people to rip the very last page out of their books, for real, and send them to him to be included in this show. Alongside the display of pages will be a book and a dramatic film scripted and directed by Fox, both compiled out of final sentences. He notes that the overwhelming themes that occur at the end of a story are love and death. A retaliation that I love has been that the people who (willingly) did tear from their books their endings, have en masse found ways to replace the words they mis-took, some have scanned the page onto their computers, photocopied and tucked it back within the novel, or even hand written the tale onto the back inside cover. How lovely. / Georgia

 

June 28 2013


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€12/€10

gig
The Soulful and The Line-Up

In a summer chock full with electro gigs and singer songwriter festivals, the discerning music lover strives to find something different. The city venues are empty as everyone tramps down to some field in the middle of nowhere. Where is the soul? Where are the harmonies? This just might be the answer. Two of Dublin’s most progressive choirs are taking to a Dublin stage for the first time since their record breaking London performance at the 30 Choir Festival (oh and a performance at last weekend’s Body&Soul). Their innovative sets sample new and classic hits from an artist list as varied as Stevie Wonder, Daft Punk, MGMT and Justin Timberlake. Expect stripped down vocal talent, multi harmonies, gutsy soloists and classic tracks like you’ve never heard them before. You’re in for a sonic treat – and not a muddy wellie in sight! Win Tickets. / Fiona Swan

   
 

June 28 2013


where
Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
12:15pm/1pm/6pm/7pm

how much
€10-€15

theatre
Human Child

Taking its title from a line contained within a Yeats poem, Human Child, the latest play from Collapsing Horse's theatrical stable, follows Lelia, a bold girl with an active imagination, a fondness for forts and a toy rat. With classmates who don't quite understand her and a father growing weary of her unruly behaviour, Lelia finds herself ostracised from the world around her and is soon transported into an other-worldly dimension filled with fairies, games and dragons named Brian. Featuring a quartet of actors changing seamlessly between characters, the show draws you into its makeshift universe like a good bedtime story. Incorporating puppetry, comedy and ukuleles, this play ostensibly aimed at human children contains enough charm and humour to keep human adults similarly engrossed and enchanted throughout. Win Tickets / Amy O'Connor

 

June 28 2013


where
Merrion Square Park, Merrion Square, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
1pm

how much
Free

concert
Opera in the Park

Carmen's Bizet is the story of a soldier 'seduced by the wiles of the fiery Gypsy'. Culturally iconic, it features in the very first Simpsons series and in an episode of the Animaniacs. But why not head outdoors for once and stop staring at the 'goggle-box' (as my granny puts it), would you. Director Morgan Crowley has put on two previous versions of Carmen, you're in good hands, and assembled a cast of about 10-14 people, all home grown talent, had the girls dressed in flirtatious and arousing costumes and the males in army fatigues and Toreador ensembles. What’s not to love about a rollicking, expressive opera, an absolute classic. Anyone who was present at last week’s Opera in the Open, Figaro, and sat happily through bursts of rain clouds followed by the rewards of a dramatic sun-shining finale will surely be re-attending. / Georgia

 

June 28 2013


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm (until July 6, 3pm Sat. matinees)

how much
€20 - €35

theatre
Howie the Rookie

If you’ve spent much time in Dublin, you’ve probably met The Howie. Or The Rookie. Maybe both. One’s a thug, one’s a lothario. You’ve nodded howyeh in taxi ranks and pub toilets. They’re from the same strip of anonymously crap suburban hinterland around the capital. They’re both called Lee but they’re not related. They’re both having a bad night. They talk in this choppin’ an’ changin’ slang that only sounds plausible when written at the end of the last decade - holy shit, the decade before that - by a then-unknown, now-famous playwright called Mark O’Rowe. Like, Hollywood famous. You might know whose night is worse, or who gets the bad rash, and you might be wrong. And you’d be a fool to miss them both played by one actor, when that actor is Tom “Nidge” Vaughan-Lawlor, largin’ it live on a bare stage in front of you at Project. Go. / Brian Lavery

 

June 28 2013


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
10:30am

how much
€30/€25

talk
Temple Bar Photography Summer School

This year marks the centenary of the 1913 Lockout, a historical point of unrest fuelled by poor living and working conditions in an era of social discontent. An important and often overlooked issue with the act of commemoration is what the past is signalling to make sense of in the year of its memorial. Essentially, how do these events help us understand our current living situation? Discourses are muddied when one begs the question, what is the role of the artist in all this? Luke Gibbons wants to clear that up. He asks, is it up to the creatives to document the social fabric of their time? Can we trust art as a true representation of fact or are such pieces simply constructed evidence of self discipline? Go to reimagine a fundamental part of our history, you may just feel clearer about the Ireland we live in today. / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

   
 

June 29 2013


where
All over town

when
All Day

how much
Free

celebration
Pride

Aw Pride, c’mere to me til I plant a massive wet one on your beautiful face. Pride is a protest, it’s a statement, it’s a party and it also raises visibility and awareness for the gay community who are working towards greater tolerance and acceptance. This year the route will go to Merrion Square again, but it starts outside the Hugh Lane Gallery. Permission to wear whatever the heck you like granted. The gay scene literally explodes and highlights to look out for include the Mother Bloc Party in Meeting House Square, Panti Bars Street party and of course the speeches at Merrion Square. Do make an effort to keep it together booze wise, its a long day and if you pass out by 4pm I'm not carrying you home. Wave your rainbow flags, kiss another gender and hear the collective voice of my community. / Joseph Kearney
 

June 29 2013


where
Studio 468

when
9pm / Forage Walk 10.30am Fri.

how much
Free but RSVP: info@commonground.ie by 3pm Sat.

event
The Producers

Don't get the wrong idea when we tell you that Dolphins Barn is a hot-bed for indigenous medicinal plants. A forager's guide to eating the native flora is just one part of the packed-out program for The Producers (subtitle: An Evening of Food, Foraging and Art), taking place on Friday and Saturday around the Barn & Rialto, curated by Gracelands don Vaari Claffey. The main event is an exhibition of various works informed by ethical food production, which includes a screening of the fascinatingly-titled Asparagus Ballet, artworks from the verdant contemporary art scene (including Garret Phelan and Oisin Byrne) and some locally foraged eats. The community-building aspect of food production, a kind of transplant of rural values to the urban canvas, is finally being harnessed in Dublin – go see what the harvest yields. / Dan Gray

 

June 29 2013


where
12 South Circular Road, 
Dublin 8


when
Mon-Fri 8:30am - 6pm, Sat 10am - 17pm

how much
€2

coffee
Nelly's

I walked into Nelly's on Tuesday, still discombobulated from a weekend of caning it, and have never been so appreciative of someone repeating 'would you like it filled to the top?' three times, at a slower tempo each time. They serve clean Italian coffee, always with a smile (their cheeks MUST hurt, right?) and there's no pressurising decision over which blend you want, which is always good when you can barely remember your own name. There are also sweet goodies to get overexcited about - the oatmeal and chocolate cookies in particular retain a sticky, melty chocolate quality, which makes them feel even naughtier than they are - as if they weren't already darn naughty enough. Don't get on your high horse about it, just jump on your High Nelly and indulge yourself in a caffeine-cum-sugar rush. / Cora Burke

 

June 29 2013


where
153 Capel St,
Dublin 1 

when
Mon - Fri 8am – 5.30pm, Sat 10-5pm

how much
Depends

coffee
Brother Hubbard

So what do you want when you pop out for coffee/brekkie/lunch? Comfortable surrounds, clever signage, eclectic music? Get yourself down to Brother Hubbard then, as not only has this lifted the general kudos of Capel Street but it has really good looking staff too, especially Ciaran. The non smoking garden is beautifully arranged too. The sweet stuff is sticky and gorgeous; the sambos tread the line between high brow and comfort grub. The coffee is 3fe/HasBean and delicious, the boy who makes it can command different designs in the froth seemingly with the power of his mind. Special nuance to note; the tip jar sign changes daily with choices such as Stevie Wonder or Stevie Nicks, so you tip the glass/sign you prefer. Call in, sit down and spoil yourself. / Joseph Kearney
   
 

June 30 2013


where
5 Blooms Lane, Ormond Quay, Dublin 1, Dublin

when
Mon-Thu: 12pm - 12am, Fri: 3pm-1am, Sat: 12-1am Sun: 12-11pm

how much
Depends

coffee
Amir's Delight

Al-salam alaykum, (Peace be upon you and Welcome) as they say in Amir's Delights, an authentic Moorish Cafe, standing out posturing like some be-jewelled fringed belly dancer amongst the swarthy Italian cafes in Wallace's micro piazza. A little spacial singularity into the Mahgreb that lets you languish outdoors, engage in worldly banter Mediterranean style whilst leering approvingly at passing trade sprouting tobacco free sheeshas in one hand. The more demure ladies could imbibe fresh mint tea, syrupy Turkish coffee and pastel coloured Tunisian fine patisserie from behind the glass panes. There's a display cabinet of foodie oriental gifts and ceramics to peruse too. Yalla! Habibi! I dare you to lounge Orientalist-painting-style amongst the colourful cushions or indulge in some impromptu shimmying to the Arabic pop inside. / Elish Bul-Godley

 

June 30 2013


where
41 Westland Row
Dublin 2


when
Mon - Sun

how much
Depends

coffee
Il Caffè di Napoli

Walk into Caffè di Napoli and make the transition from an indifferent Pearse Street to a Italian piazza. Suitably rude waitresses demand your order and disdainfully disregard at your pale, sun-shy skin. Marvel at the coffee served in visually appeasing branded cups and wonder how they opened the restaurant underneath that simply appeared one day, hewn from the solid rock under Westland Row. To sit outside is more expensive but to be honest, there's not much atmosphere in watching the Maynooth train trundle across the bridge. Best to run the gauntlet of finding a seat inside and tempt yourself with some homemade cakes and biscuits. A sister outlet opened up around the corner on the very unItalian Fenian Street, and rumour is that Enda can be found there some mornings, grabbing a hot one before jumping into the state car.  / Vernon Steel

 

July 01 2013


where


when
7am - 7pm

how much
€2.15 single expresso / €8.50 Jamacian Blue Mountain

coffee
Sasha House Petite

Three years ago when we were considering where to establish Le Cool HQ in Dublin, we stood in this concrete slab nestled beside the Drury Street car park entrance. We dreamed a dream of a shop front window on the city, Thursday evening launches and a drop-in space for ideas and thoughts. Then an accompanying person from Dublin City Council dropped the word 'rates' and we sloped away taking our dreams elsewhere. Ukranian Nataliya Svyrydenko passed by the same space on her way to Dublin Business School for her accountancy studies and decided this could become home to her creation. She's installed micro roasteries and burlap sacks, pressed play on Caravan Palace and cooked up continental pastries such as the Viennesse Sacher tart. A derelict space huddled from the sun is now a haven close to the hubub. A petite idea is growing in stature. / le cool Dublin

   
 

July 01 2013


where
Ranelagh Village Market
Ranelagh
Dublin 6


when
Mon-Fri 7:30 - 6pm, Sat 9am - 6pm, Sun 9:30am - 6pm

how much
Depends

coffee
Nick's Coffee

Dublin has produced or trained some of the world’s finest baristas. Stephen Morrissey was World Barista Champion in 2008. He went on to work at Intelligentsia, Chicago, whence sprang 2010 world champ Mike Philips. We're home to award-winning Coffee Angel Karl Purdy, beautiful barista/philosopher Vicky Fitz Henry and 3fe's Colin Harmon. And quietly tucked away in Ranelagh is a microcosm of all that is great in Dublin coffee culture; a tiny kiosk serving superb coffee, selling a small selection of excellent beans and offering a quiet moment or bizarre and eclectic conversation worthy of Mr Beckett himself. The eponymous Nick says he does it because coffee and conversation are the only things he’s good at, “..and landscape gardening”, he adds. If he goes into the landscaping business, I’ll have to start caring about my garden. / Kay Scorah

 

July 01 2013


where
Teacher's Club, 36 Parnell Square West Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10

theatre
Hemingway's Short Stories

We're big fans of Ernest Hemingway's shortest ever story chez Mc - "For sale: baby shoes, never worn". Party poopers will be quick to point out it's unlikely he wrote it, but nonetheless it regularly inspires a slew of imitators in one of the weekend supplements. Everyone knows the apocryphal stories are the best ones anyway. What is undeniable is a play based on Hemingway's short stories with more definite ancestry has rich seams of material to mine. In the intimate surroundings of the Theatre Club, Burning House Productions draw on a selection of tales across his short narrative output featuring some of his favorite themes of war and its effect on men. In a touch that Papa himself would no doubt approve of, you can avail of some bespoke cocktails on the night, including the Hemingway Daiquiri, to enter his world in more ways than one. / Kate McEvoy

   
 

July 02 2013


where
22 Lower Liffey Street, D1

when
5pm

how much
Free

exhibition
All Art Is Propaganda

You have to respect the attitude to Counter Propaganda. Amidst the mass of high street retailers that are sucking the individuality out of Dublin, they strive to stand out as an Irish, independent store, with a brand mix bought specifically for local Dublin customers as opposed to dictated by someone in a buying office in London or Madrid. Today, however, it's not about the clobber. It's all about the street art. Richard and Fergal are clearing out the Liffey Street space to make way for a Street Art exhibition and sale, and they've bagged a pure decent line-up to replace the tees and trainers. Solus, Fink, Marca Mix, Kin, Meep, Visual Waste and more will give you a perfectly good contemporary snap shot of one of Dublin's most vibrant sub-cultures at the moment. Buy something or just hang out and get all streets on it. / Vernon Steel

 

July 02 2013


where
Ranelagh Arts Centre, 26 Ranelagh, Dublin 6


when
Until

how much
Free

exhibition
Domestic

Monika Crowley’s Domestic is a collection of screen prints inspired by a recipe for brown bread which was passed on to the artist by her mother while she was expecting her first child. The exhibition features everyday household items such as flour, eggs, butter and cream, as well as various types of ice-cream, representing a contrast between the banalities of providing for a family and moments of celebration. It also examines the differences between modern and traditional motherhood. Factors such as stress and financial strain have created nostalgia about a time when mothers were not expected to balance careers and home life, despite the fact that many women were trapped in their domestic roles. Crowley’s images are full of subtle details which aren’t apparent right away, but which are thought-provoking and memorable once noticed. / Kayla Marie Walsh

   
 

July 02 2013


where
Filmbase, Curved Street Building, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Mon through to Sat with evening hours on Thu/Fri/Sat nights.

how much
Depends

coffee
Roasted Brown

Roasted Brown lies in a deceptively large space above Filmbase; eye to eye with Maser's B.P Fallon. Serving coffee (and expertly time-brewed teas) upstairs, they foster a real hang-out vibe in the space. Most importantly, they recognise how key cake is to true enjoyment of a hot beverage. A squidgy brownie perched next to a muddy espresso is the only true way to salute the magnificence of a great coffee. The lads at Roasted Brown are also adding an extra social dimension to the coffee revolution, having most recently put on a gig from SPIES. With Costa newly set up in Temple Bar, and with Starfucks and McDonalds allegedly on the way; Roasted Brown, and it's neighbours at Tamp & Stitch and Indigo & Cloth, are giving this post-TBCT meltdown and Temple Bar crisis of identity the middle finger, and keeping up the good work. / Cora Burke

 

July 02 2013


where
The Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
Free

cinema
Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy

This is the story of a man. An Anchorman. A charismatic creature clad in synthetic suits with the ability to enrapture San Diego with his golden tongue, Ron Burgundy is at the top of his game, kind of a big deal. King in a man's world, owner of many leather bound books and an apartment that smells of rich mahogany, until a ravishing reporter with a thirst for success enters the newsroom. Immediately entranced by her "exquisite breasts" and "breathtaking heinie" he, and the unflattering pattern on his pants, is struck down by his only flaw, his love for Veronica Corningstone. Who will deliver the much anticipated news of Ming Chung's birth to the vastly anticipating Whale Vaginians? The age old battle between between love and ambition ensues. Welcome to the gun show. / Sarah Maguire

   
 

July 03 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See http://www.ifi.ie/film/renoir/

how much
€5.40-€9

cinema
Renoir

Set in the south of France in the summer of 1915, Renoir tells the story of the renowned Impressionist artist and his son Jean, who went on to become one of the greatest film directors of all time. When the free-spirited Andrée enters their world, she becomes a muse to both men, enchanting and rejuvenating them with her passion and beauty. If you are in any way impatient, this is not the film for you – the plot ambles aimlessly along, with no real climax. However, it makes up for the lack of dramatic tension with its sumptuous visuals. Most of the shots seem to feature a naked Andrée wading through a river or frolicking in a meadow, the dappled light bouncing off her creamy skin. As films go, Renoir is more of a still life than a drama, but in the words of the elderly painter: “The flesh is all that matters.” / Kayla Marie Walsh

 

July 03 2013


where
Cineworld, Parnell Street, D1
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
€8.30-€13.60

cinema
World War Z

Based on the bestseller by Max Brooks, son of the legendary Mel (no really) World War Z tells the story of Gerry Lane, a former UN employee who must travel the world to try and find a solution to a zombie epidemic engulfing the globe. In recent years the explosion of zombie flicks has waned in favour of sparkly vampires and various superheroes. This break, combined with what (initially at least) appears to be a fresh approach, should make this one of the more interesting zombie flicks since 28 Days Later. Fans of the book will give out as the film bears little resemblance, although having read it, a straight adaptation would have been really boring. This is an attempt at large-scale seriousness within a genre that’s never had that treatment before, and it’s worth noting that the last time someone tried that we got The Dark Knight. / David Cadwallader

 

July 03 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
11am-6pm

how much
Depends

coffee
Vice

Geek out over your coffee in Vice Bar, the Twisted Pepper's sober alter-ego. Tom Stafford, who trained under Colin Harmon in the former 3FE space, has now taken the space over and is serving up one of the finest cuppa joes in this fair city. They serve coffees from a variety of roasters, which currently include a range of AA rated Kenyans from Swedish roasters 'Koppi' and new roastery Cloudpicker, while also keeping it local with coffee from Mojo Roasters in Wicklow. If you're hardcore and love your creamy espressos, their current house espresso is HasBean's La Fany, with caramel undertones - adding some much needed creamy sweetness to what can often be a bit of a bitter caffeine pill. You'll leave blazing and all set to indulge your own personal vices... / Cora Burke

   
 
Urbun Outfitters
Le Cool ventured to Cabinteely to talk Urbun with Katie, Niamh (not pictured) and Vini.

Niamh: We always wanted to offer a really high standard of coffee, right from the offset. When we opened two and a half years ago, there weren’t that many cafés in Dublin offering superior quality coffee. There are a lot of places cropping up now. The perfect cup of coffee has different connotations for everybody. Every process has to be carried out correctly; you need a barista who knows the science behind it.

Vini (barista): If someone tells you that they know everything about coffee, it’s a lie. Coffee is changing all the time, every day they are discovering new things, new techniques. It never stops.

A good barista needs passion. Like everything in life, you have to love what you are doing – otherwise it’s pointless. You have to connect with people. You have to know what the customer wants. You have the opportunity to engage with them. A barista is not just a person behind a coffee machine - a machine behind a machine. You have to feel, you have to keep learning. It’s all part of the package.

Urbun is located on the Old Bray Road, Cabinteely, D18. Photo: Al Higgins