Dublin Selected *196

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This week, Pat Kenny implored listeners to 'move the dial' as he migrates from RTÉ to Newstalk 106-108.  This prompted some questions from our side. For example: "What is a dial?"

But it also got us thinking. So we, too, are asking you to 'move the dial'. Not the dials on your radios, mind you, but the dials in your heads. We're asking you to 'move the dial' to a world where Granby Park wouldn't just be a pop-up space, but rather a long-term fixture fostering art and creativity in an outdoor space.

A little to the left, a little to the right, we're asking you to 'move the dial' to a Liffey with a bridge named after a woman as brave as any of her male counterparts. AM to FM, we're asking you to 'move the dial' to a better place where Monster Truck Gallery could survive and continue to host extraordinary exhibitions in Temple Bar.

Finally, we're asking you to 'move the dial' to a world where creatives aren't pitted against one another in lists or forced to shill for votes in order to secure funding for their projects and endeavors.

Who thinks there's no need to 'move the dial' if you've got broadband? , Amy, Kate, Michael, Ciaran or Olen?

"D'yaknowhwatimeanlike" - The Stone Twins
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August 29 2013


where
Dublin Civic Trust, 4 Castle Street, Dublin 2


when
Until 30 August

how much
Free

exhibition
Vanishing Ireland

On walls stripped unevenly of its skin – the bricks and the scaffolding wooden grids and the plaster innards meant not to be seen, exposed – under a ceiling that has loomed over the space ever since it was constructed as the first purpose-built gallery in the British Isles, are photographs of Irish men and women of all stripes – publicans, livestock breeders, musicians, artists – stretched onto canvas: some of the subjects out in the full colour of the countryside, some in repose indoors, some drained of colour to highlight faces scored by age; all fixed within the boundaries of the canvas, in voluptuous photographic detail – an effort by Turtle Bunbury and James Fennell to stall them from drifting into extinction. Hosted in the City Assembly House, an 18 century building itself a vital relic of a moment in Irish history. / Olen Bajarias

 

August 29 2013


where
Irish Writers Centre, 19 Parnell Square North, Dublin 1.
01 872 2077
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
€5

talk
Kjersti A. Skomsvold

John Kelly is, among other things, an author, a broadcaster, a champion of Irish arts and the voice of the Christmas Guinness ad. Mike McCormack is not only an amazing, critically-acclaimed writer but also a gentleman-and-a-half who sometimes sports an excellent cowboy hat. And Kjersti A. Skomsvold is a Norwegian author who broke my little heart with her IMPAC Award nominated début novel, The Faster I Walk, The Smaller I Am. Now, their powers combined, three of the most interesting voices in contemporary literature will be chatting at the Irish Writers' Centre about their writing and the difficulties and rewards that come with writing fiction outside the mainstream. The event is running as part of the inaugural Outposts Literature Exchange, which brings together writers from outskirts of Europe. This'un'll be a beaut. / Carrie M. King

   
 

August 29 2013


where
Peacock Theatre, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm, Saturday matinee 2:30pm

how much
€12-25

theatre
Gulliver's Travels

Conall Morrison’s adaptation of Swift’s satire on human nature sees the young actors of the National Youth Theatre in restless motion – weathering shipwrecks, dancing in celebration after victory in battle, staggering in awe of Gulliver’s scaled-waaayup proportions – particles in inertia, stilled only intermittently by Handel’s baroque notes shepherding the start of a song and dance number. A bizarre scene in which the citizens of Lilliput, paralysed by the unnecessary hand-holding of unnecessary laws, are unable to think for themselves – to the extent that they struggle to figure out how to crack open an egg the right way – reverberate with urgency. Other efforts at rendering Swift’s wisecracks seem densely overlaid, but perhaps appropriate to a mostly young (read: pre-teen) audience. / Olen Bajarias

 

August 29 2013


where
National Concert Hall, 2 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2,
01 417 0077‎
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10-38

concert
Disco Inferno!

Although now the stuff of suburban dance floor roadkill, Daft Punk's Get Lucky has spawned something of a disco revival. For those craving another injection of disco-gone-good, head to the NCH for an orchestral challenge to the French duo's hold over the genre's resurgence. DISCO INFERNO! will feature tracks from heavy hitters such as the Bee Gees, and Donna Summer, masterfully remixed with orchestral genius that will undoubtedly have the aisles crammed. The injection of swooping strings and brass into tracks that are ever iconic, despite the battering the genre received at the tailend of its popularity, show that disco can indeed enjoy a triumphant return. Unleash your boogie and shake moves that have been lying dormant for decades, but, please gentlemen, leave the flares at home. / Sophie Donaldson

   
 

August 30 2013


where
White Lady Art Gallery, 14 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2


when
12-7pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Sherlock Holmes

Behind the calabash pipe and the deerstalker, Sherlock Holmes gained a reputation for having the most formidable intellects in literary history. Famed for his pioneering methods of forensic science, powers of deduction and death defying swimming capabilities, Holmes brought order to the foggy streets of London town solving flesh-creeping mysteries such The Red-Headed League…There is a whiff of 221b Baker St. around Wellington Quay presently, with an exhibition featuring the essential accouterments of the Victorian super sleuth, including an array of monocles and microscopes and particularly intriguing Alphabet Puzzle by Meg Hyland. On Friday night Dr. Sheila Willis of the Forensic Science Laboratory gives a CSI-style talk on criminal investigative procedures and analysis for you to go all Dr Watson over... / Aaron Purcell

 

August 30 2013


where
Hugh Lane Gallery, 1 Parnell Square West, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10am-5pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Sleepwalkers: Lee Welch

Lee Welch contributes to the Sleepwalkers project by covering gallery 8 with blue vertical lines that stretch up and tremble under the heft of the roof – to a certain suggestible viewer transforming the space into ummm…well, let’s say, the mouth of a whale: the vertical lines baleen bristle and he, the feckless Jonah schmuck trapped within it. Panic drives the eye to search for escape, and finding none, the gaze lands upon various objects around – a canvas on which images from the artist’s studio are projected; and white invitation cards, bearing text like ‘Every movement reveals us’, stranded on mirrored shelves among bric-a-brac that wink with meaning. A choreography of rhythm, repetition and pulse, the exhibition spits the viewer back out into the world with new eyes. / Olen Bajarias

   
 

August 31 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€10

cinema
Tokyo Drifter

Tokyo Drifter, not to be confused with The Fast and The Furious: Tokyo Drift, is a highly stylised, violent tale of redemption, loyalty and betrayal from 1960s Japan. The film tells the story of Tetsu, a member of a reformed yakuza or mafia gang, whose sense of obligation to his former boss leads him to reject an invitation to join the ranks of a rival gang. As a result Tetsu is viewed as a liability, one that must be “rubbed out” by the group, forcing him to flee Tokyo and go on the run. Expect some bizarre scenes, such as our hero dressed in a powder blue suit singing in the snow and a villain with the fashion sense of PSY doling out backhanders to a bevy of goons. This imagery coupled with a fantastic use of lighting, colour and a haunting soundtrack give this traditional gangster story an original, slightly unusual tone. / Ruth Hurl

 

August 31 2013


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
3:30pm

how much
€10

gig
Spirit of Folk

Every so often some awful bastardised version of what folk should be creeps into the popular realm, but all the while there is this whole world of folk clubs and sea shanty festivals and folk festivals filled with people absorbed by the stories and the sadness that continues to gather people to it. In that vein, The Spirit of Folk Feastival is here, where festivallers will eat, drink and be merry while folksters play for the prize of the Spirit of Folk Award. Tonight is the semi-finals, a mini folk festival in the city where nine bands sing for a place in the finals. Make sure to hear Laura Ann Brady with her incredible voice and melodic autoharp, and Mossy Nolan who is one of few musicians able to make real folk songs for the now. / Alex Calder

   
 

September 01 2013


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
4pm

how much
€10

party
Tea Party

Confession: In a move that may force me to forfeit my Irish passport, I must announce that I do not care for tea. Never have, never will. I know, I'm sorry. If it makes you feel any better I'm a pariah with in my own family for this very reason. However I do enjoy moist cake, vintage photo booths and a well-executed Charleston. Kat's Annual Vintage Tea Party has these things in abundance, along with the obligatory warm beverage of course. These no doubt highlights join a stellar line up of musical delights including swing, jazz, blues and tango and a cabaret show featuring comedy, burlesque and circus performances. For the more participatory among you, you can partake of a vintage hair make over and a taster swing dance class. You are of course encouraged to break out your vintage finery to mark this most auspicious occasion. / Kate McEvoy

 

September 01 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
Upstream Colour

Almost a decade after his no-budget cult classic Primer beguiled and bamboozled in equal measure (it really starts to make sense after your sixth viewing) and the collapse of his planned sci-fi epic A Topiary due to budget constraints, Shane Carruth returns with Upstream Colour, another startling insight into the mind of a genuinely unique director. Less beholden to overt genre tropes than his debut (the plot has something to do with a fictional hypnotic drug, field recordings and, uh, pig farming) the film is a heady hit of dreamstuff, an intricately patterned chain of imagery both disturbing and beautiful. A true original, it throws the paucity of imagination in most multiplex fare into stark relief and shows Carruth to be a film-maker totally in command of his own singular vision. Hollywood, give this man your money. / Conor McDevitt

   
 

September 02 2013


where
The Light House Cinema, Market Square, Smithfield, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
See See HERE

how much
€6-€9

cinema
The Way Way Back

"It's the kind of film you'd be delighted to see come up as the RTÉ Midweek Movie." I consider this high praise and The Way, Way Back is indeed worthy of it. On the surface, the film might seem like it ambles through well-trod territory. Indeed, any coming-of-age film about a fifteen-year-old boy having the summer of his life in a water park can't profess to reinvent the wheel. What sets The Way, Way Back apart from other films of its ilk, however, is the execution. Its excellent ensemble cast, which includes Sam Rockwell looking very well in a vest, is comprised of all your favourite people, who nail each punchline and help steer the film from the triteness that lurks beneath. With an abundance of laughs, some at the expense of a cockeyed child, and moments of pathos, it's a charming crowdpleaser if ever there was one. / Amy O'Connor

   
 

September 03 2013


where
Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay D2
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
Free

screening
Ferris Bueller's Day Off

The slightest of John Hughes' teen trifecta (Pretty in Pink, The Breakfast Club), Ferris Bueller's Day Off is almost certainly the most fun. This 1986 gem is endlessly entertaining, eminently quotable and smart as a whip. Watching this as a kid you felt as if you were along for the ride, playing hooky with Ferris, Sloane and Cameron. You wished that you had his wisecracks, his white shoes, his girlfriend. I actually recreated the Art Institute scene as a callow 16 year old in Chicago. It might show its age in places but it remains a joyous celebration of the guiltless irresponsibility and boundless monomania of adolescence. "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it…" Sage words. Righteous dude. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

September 03 2013


where
Filmbase, Curved Street Building, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€40

talk
'Adventures in Independent Cinema'

Since 1987 Christine Vachon has built up a staggering portfolio, one that certainly ranks up there with the greats. From the likes of Poison and Stonewall through Velvet Goldmine, Boys Don’t Cry, I’m Not There and Cracks, her films have defied genres and she has managed to transcend trends and industry changes. Embracing an anti-Hollywood pro-New York stance, her work has remained relevant, interesting and independent. Vachon has never been afraid of sharing her two cents about the industry but has always done so in a professional, witty and entertaining manner (she’s the last person you’ll find name dropping). Covering topics from funding to film festival strategy, it promises to be an unmissable film. Unless you’re not interested in films, in which case it’s best avoided. / David Cadwallader

   
 

September 04 2013


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
1pm, 3:35pm, 6:10pm, 8:45pm

how much
€6-7.50

cinema
About Time

A non-specific look of expectation hovers over Tim’s face as he waits for a quiver of recognition from Mary – only no, actually, she wouldn’t know who he was…yet. Tim can travel back in time; at will, he relives ‘‘mothership’’ moments in his life, those that might leap to ‘‘Girlfriend’’ or at the very least ‘‘One-night stand’’ tangents, botched at first attempt by his stumbling gaucheness. Like a filmmaker discarding imperfect takes – wayward innuendos, unflattering-to-the-point-of-ostracism self-revelations – he rehearses his ‘‘first’’ meeting with Mary ad infinitum, settling for one that extends itself to a disastrous post-wedding bash that swoons into glorious ruin. The film is lifted out of the same fate as it expands beyond the romantic comedy pastoral, its architecture buttressed by a vanguard of supporting actors. / Olen Bajarias

 

September 04 2013


where
The MART Gallery, 190a Rathmines Road Lower, Dublin, Ireland


when
6pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Curb Your Carrie Bradshawism

Does it pay, does it sell, does it make money? Increasingly, the validation of most art practice has become synonymous with value. Many argue that enlightenment and the arts go hand in hand, authenticating a free society which openly critiques ideological status quos but continuously, the main mechanism that tends to legitimate art, is money. This exhibition questions the restrictions this culture imposes. Creating an egalitarian platform for artists to exhibit their work, this show endeavours to balance out the rising consumerism of the art world by restricting artistic materials. This resourceful idea is engaging and informs the consumption and application of the pieces. Expect a diverse range of finished outcomes and conceptual considerations, despite it all starting with a cardboard box. / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

 
We Need Our Space...

We uncluttered our heads and hit up Kaph to talk Making Space with Orlaith Ross.

I had the idea of a pop-up space where artists could come and make a small body of work for sale. Kaph was a perfect spot. Dublin has developed into this place with a massive coffee culture, and an interest in art and creativity. There’s a strong dynamic between the two. I didn’t set the artists any parameters. What I suggested was that they try and make artwork that’s between 10 and 20 euro.

The idea is that if you’re on your lunch break, and you go and get your salad and coffee, and you have an extra 10 euro, you would be able to buy a piece of art.

Spaces like this are important because they give artists an opportunity to connect with people on a one-to-one basis. Each week there will be an event, an exhibition or a talk, which will open up the artists to people that may not necessarily have been familiar with their work before. It hasn’t been done before, so it will be an interesting experiment.

Making Space @ Kaph welcomes its first artist-in-residence, Steve McCarthy, at 31 Drury Street, from 12pm. PHOTO: Oliver Keogh Smith