Dublin Selected *199

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Fringe season. Every night a show. The expectation from those who put on shows on others to review them mean an inundation of invites combine with the tiny gene puddle of Dublin life to create a perfect shit storm and an impossible task.

The heat is on, but here's the rub. It comes down to hagiography versus critical writing. Ultimately, writing positive reviews of any show (or any body of work) because your best mate's close pal's second cousin's parish priest is the director or because of an attitude of 'sure, isn't great that they are trying' are ultimately self defeating. It keeps us insular, isolated and strictly average.

At Le Cool, we tiptoe around this grey area by simply not running editorial on events that our writers don't honestly enjoy. We also ask people to declare their interests and while we may not get it right all the time, we're not beholden to anyone. However, proper critiques (negative or otherwise) definitely have a place in our creative society. What else is going to push people to go further, make them prove their detractors wrong, or simply raise the standard of us all if we can't be honest?

Who wants to get critical, critical, this week? Ciaran, Michael, Kate, Amy or Olen?
"It's a technique known as cinemagraph." - Steve Gallagher
... Read More
   
 

September 19 2013


where
The New Theatre, 43 Essex Street East, Dublin 2
01 670 3361
Location Map

when
1pm

how much
€12/€14

fringe
The Games People Play

Oisin and Niamh are a typical young married couple in Drumcondra. They have kids, bills to pay and little or no income. On the eve of Oscar’s 7th birthday the babes are put to bed and mammy and daddy are setting up for the big day. Across board games and pregnant sentences we discover a family on the brink of ruin, financially and emotionally. The play seems so real, so plausible. These conversations probably happened to our parents and are happening to couples right now. Are the children of this generation doomed to inherit the cost of our excesses? Basics are beyond the family’s reach, the punishment for once voting Fianna Fail. Rise Productions are not afraid to tackle heavy and very real issues even if it is a lunch time show. The love in this family is obvious, it’s the hate and regret that sticks the knife in. / Joseph Kearney

 

September 19 2013


where
The Market Studios, Cnr. Halston St. & Mary's Lane, Dublin 7.
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Botox

If there's one thing Colm Mac Athlaoich doesn't need, it's Botox. The good-looking, nice guy, talented bastard that he is. But let's separate the man from his art for a moment. For, even if Colm was a buck-toothed, hunch-backed, pot-bellied, personality vacuum, his work would still command your rightful attention. The pieces for this show is already selling online, before it has opened. Which just shows you the compulsory-purchasing, must-have quality that Colm's art possesses. It's beautiful, botanical and Botox it ain't, but maybe that's the point. The show will comprise of paintings, drawings, print and wood carvings that have 'a recurring theme or at least a few colours that match.' Hit the Hacienda afterwards to congratulate the man in person. / Vernon Steel

 

September 19 2013


where
Axis Ballymun, Main Street, Ballymun Dublin 9.
Location Map

when
Until September 30th

how much
Free

photo exhibition
I Only Miss You When You're Gone

Dublin is all the more colourful for the existence of Aidan Kelly. He's Dublin's documentarian in a sense, and years from now we'll look back on his photos with the same reference we listen to Alan Lomax recordings. Few others love the city as he does. In his own words, "Dublin is a woman, she's large breasted, she drinks a lot, she's funny, she's falls over and I pick her up." For this pick-me-up exhibition Aidan mentored photographers Andrea O’Carroll, Ciara Corrigan, Dave Lacken, Frank Scalzo, Phillip McMahon and Simon Prunty and the results are worth the trip to this cultural hub of Dublin 9. The six photographers were chosen through an application process based on previous works and they've flourished under Kelly's guidance. Make some time for this snap shot of Dublin right now. You'll only miss it when it's gone. / Vernon Steel

   
 

September 19 2013


where
Kaph, Drury Street, Dublin 2.

when
6pm-9pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Making Space

It's been all go-go-girlpower at Kaph for the last two weeks, with Fatti Burke and Fuchsia MacAree up to make-and-do divilry as part of Making Space. The ladies, famed for their vibrant and cheering illustrations, have coated the whitewash walls in art for you to bring home and cherish at a price that won't have you eating Lidl instant noodles for the rest of the month. Both ladies have also distinguished themselves amongst the current proliferation of maps doing the rounds at the moment, which has had us imagining cartography-offs in the studio, and sneaky sneaky atlas thefts on their coffee breaks. Talking of coffee, they've been highly caffeinated with the ace black schtuff on offer in Kaph, so their work will be only the more prolific for it! / Madison Albright

 

September 19 2013


where
The New Theatre, 43 Essex Street East, Dublin 2
01 670 3361
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€12/€14

fringe
Lambo

Michael Ford Fitzgerald shines in this his latest role as Gerry Ryan. The stage is filled with people brought to life by a single gesture and powerful vocal control. Lambo has perhaps seven characters interwoven into a brilliantly crafted script and Fitzgerald has nailed it. On hearing the play featured an event in Gerry Ryan’s life, I worried it might be a bit too soon but actually this play is a celebration of Ryan. The show highlights a moment in Gerry’s life when everything was to play for and he was on the way up. It presents the greatness of the man and echoes the traits of ambition and drive that so many young men have in abundance. Gerry back then was just one of the boys. It is so refreshing to remember just how great Ryan was and a tribute to Travers prowess as a writer to capture a bygone era so perfectly. / Joseph Kearney

 

September 19 2013


where
The Back Loft, La Catedral Art Studios, 7-11 St Augustine St, Dublin 8


when
8pm

how much
€12 / €14

fringe
Deep

This is a journey into sound, the sound of the legendary black box at the tip of the South Mall in Cork called Sir Henry's. Raymond Scannell asks us to swop our Blue Ghosts for a Mitsubishi as he weaves the BPM of brothers Danny and Larry Lehane into the groove of the scene. Deep splices era defining tracks, and interviews with key protagonists whilst reliving the rush of moments such as Garnier dropping I Feel Love in '92. Scannell's vocal trickery on his cast of characters is joyous at times (Terry the mother being a standout) but on occasion skims across a swathe of characters giving us a rush more than a high. Deep is for those who have greeted the sun beams outside by closing the shutters, for those who spent alot of money to look so cheap and pushed on through to the other side surrounded by music and friends. / Michael McDermott

 

September 19 2013


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8-11pm

how much
€10

gig
Heathers

The vivid, punchy songwriting style of Dublin twins Louise and Ellie McNamara, aka Heathers, is a testament to their diverse range of influences, among them Yann Tiersen, Bruce Springsteen, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Feist. After a blistering debut album characterised by raw, folky abandon framed by a lone acoustic guitar accompaniment, last year's follow up, Kingdoms, saw the introduction of extra instrumentation and slicker production values, resulting in a fuller sound. Their impassioned vocals and lush two-part harmonies remain constant, however, as do the simple, infectious vocal melodies and irresistible, singalong choruses that make their songs so very addictive. As this is being hosted by the Trinity College Irish language society expect a particularly jovial atmosphere and dizzying levels of craic. / Oisin Leonard

   
 

September 20 2013


where
The Pearse Centre, 27 Pearse Street, Dublin 2


when
6:30pm

how much
€10/€12

theatre
Boys and Girls

Dylan Coburn Gray has delivered a masterpiece. The script is near perfection. It talks about genitals in enormous detail but with such sincerity that it’s not only pleasant, it’s liberating. Four expressive, sparkling, young performers tell a rolling rhyming tale of their separate nights out. Boy confident, boy shy, girl choosey and girl practical, all tell the story of their journey, their loves and their nights out. While the stories are not directly connected, in a sense they are all looking for the same things; connection, love and affection. The writer is unafraid, unabashed and has a command of English that is enviable. Feast on word porn as glorious adjectives fill the room, drink your fill of tender nouns as they pour forth and enjoy the rest of the flowing beautiful spoken word that is Boys and Girls. / Joseph Kearney

 

September 20 2013


where
All over Dublin, see link.

when
All day

how much
Free

celebration
Culture Night

The annual event that is Culture Night returns this Friday evening and with over 200 things to visit, it promises to be more stuffed than a teen's bra at a Beiber concert. Doors all over Dublin will be thrown open to the public from 5 to 11pm. From the mysterious Freemason House (dare you) to the bustling Meeting House Square, we're invited into the secret worlds and workings of other people's Dublin. You can keep up to date on what's kicking off via @CultureNight. There's lots of ways to explore (app, map or the age old classic 'they've got balloons on the door so this must be the place) and Dublin Bus will be throwing on a number of routes for free. You won't see all of it but you'll have great craic trying all the same. Our advice? Have a loose plan, and if you haven't a clue what a place is, then definitely pop in. / Rachel Lucy Ray

   
 

September 20 2013


where
Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
9pm

how much
€16/€18

fringe
Taylor Mac A 20th Century Concert: Abridged

This is a show that demands audiences have an authentic experience, you must feel something and you may even be required to react. The beauty and genius of performance art is that it can’t fail so even if you leave hating this show Taylor Mac has succeeded. You won’t be able to resist the robust charm of this dazzling performer whose sexuality and gender are lovingly disclosed during the show. Taylor has selected 10 pop songs from the last century to give us a glimpse of the past from a newly revised gender aware perspective. Teasing out the feminism in war songs or the transphobia in certain musical structures may fascinate you. Perhaps being empowered to threaten a room of strangers might appeal to one or two of you and if so this show is also for you. The performance is as effortless as it is perfect. / Joseph Kearney

 

September 20 2013


where
Olympia Theatre, 72 Dame Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€33.50

gig
Manic Street Preachers

A band who've taught us more about the historical, social and political than any text book, the Manics remain unsurpassed when it comes to intelligence, melancholy and melodic brute force. What band today would have the bombast to state they'd sell 16 million copies of their debut, promptly break up and yet follow that failed mission statement with a 20 year career that outguns their contemporaries? Few measure up. New release Rewind The Film is an acoustic affair exposing them at their most reflective, embracing the landscape that their young glam punk selves tried to escape. Live, this pared back approach should see the lyrical intricacies and their innate knack for a soaring tune shine through. But don't bin the eyeliner or feather boas just yet, they're still the same band Fidel Castro labelled louder than war. / Sarah Folan

   
 

September 21 2013


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
€14

fringe
Mice Will Play

Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh (fiddle) and Nic Gareiss (percussive dance) are the John Boy and Jim Bob of this tale - two utterly alluring, smiley, sparkling eyed chaps. Mice Will Play is their charming exploration of mice in all their spine-tingly ways. They inform us about scientific research in the Charles River Laboratories, pay homage to them in literature and TV and use recordings of relations and strangers to honour these creatures/vermin. There's even a sean nós singer. But it's the deft interplay of fiddle and tap, the coupling of string tweak and shoe scratch, the marriage of delicacy and invention which makes this such an absorbing experience suffused with enthusiasm and charm. It's even easy to forgive their slightly stretched acting vignettes as these Pied Pipers lead on us on a merry dance. / Michael McDermott

 

September 21 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
8.30pm

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
Discoverdale

There are several hybridous monikers that could be applied to Discoverdale. Mockumentary, rockumentary, mockrockumentary. Borrowing from and building on the legacy of Christopher Guest, Discoverdale marks Dead Cat Bounce's debut cinematic foray. It tells the story of Jim, lead singer of comedy rock group Dead Cat Bounce, as he tries to reunite with his father, who is none other than David Coverdale, lead singer of Whitesnake. What ensues is a rollicking cross-continental trip that sees the group travel across Ireland, UK and Norway goin' down the only road they've ever known in an attempt to meet Coverdale. A firm favourite of critics and audiences alike, the film stays true to Dead Cat Bounce's delightfully silly and playful sensibility. A worthy addition to the mockumentary canon. / Amy O'Connor

 

September 21 2013


where
Axis Ballymun, Main Street, Ballymun Dublin 9.
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
€5

gig
Lethal Dialect

1988. A cracking Irish summer, Nelson Mandela awarded the freedom of Dublin while the city itself celebrates it's 1,000th birthday. Oh, and Ray Houghton putting the ball in the English net. Good times. Lethal Dialect reels in that year with his new album, 1988, one he's been working on while taking up residency in the Axis in Ballymun. Today, an all ages audience can catch the new album exclusively performed in full in the same building it was recorded in. It should give the performance an assured edge that LD probably doesn't need to be fair, as he is already a pro when it comes to flow. But it does give you yet another reason this week to visit the Ballymun, and only lose one thing, your misguided preconceptions about the place. / Vernon Steel

 

September 21 2013


where
Granby Park, Dominick Street Lower, Dublin 1.


when
3pm

how much
Free

gig
Minimum Maximum @ Granby Park

All good things must come to an end. Both Geoffrey Chaucer and Nelly Furtado have asserted as much, so it must be true. And it can certainly be said of Granby Park, which having injected life and vitality to an otherwise neglected space, prepares to shut up shop and bid us adieu. Before it departs the cityscape, however, Nialler9 has curated a daytime musical extravaganza to lead it out with a glorious bang. For the first in a series of events to be held under his Minimum Maximum banner, Nialler has enlisted disco dinosuars Tierraniesaur, Dublin rapper Lethal Dialect and Australian import Liza Flume, among others, to provide jams and good times. As always, the event is free of charge and open to bambinos and grown-ups alike. / Amy O'Connor

   
 

September 21 2013


where
Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA), 15 Ely Place, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until 20th October

how much
Free

exhibition
Hard Keepers

Gargantuan apes smile down at you. Teenagers sprawl nearby, meeting you with that defiant yet vacant gaze perfected during adolescence. Family units cluster intimately, their transparent clothing exposing body parts usually hidden away. What really remains in the difference between us and them? Marlene McCarty expertly juxtaposes the savagery capable of refined humans with the innocence of wild beasts in her colossal portraits that seethe and flit with a thousand biro strokes. Chimps and humans canoodle with unnerving proximity, repressed youths heave upon each other and bible bashing families holler with a smothering intensity. The images fast unravel from fascinating to disturbing as the events behind these scenes are revealed and leave you wondering who the wild ones are after all. / Sophie Donaldson

 

September 21 2013


where
A4 Sounds, 19 Mountainview Avenue, Harold's Cross, Dublin 6W


when
2pm

how much
€5

family
A4 Funland

A4 Sounds is the collective studio space for people who like black markers in Harold's Cross. With its members scattered across the world, it works as a space where any of its numerous members can work when in Dublin. They sound like sound lads, right? They're so sound that they are opening up the studios for a day of good clean fun. Your fiver through the door will get you 20 'fun passes', for you to flutter away on human 'whack-a-mole', virtual reality roller coasters (eat your heart out, Futuroscope), and what has been described as 'a very silent disco'. This all sounds intriguing and quirkier than a granny's Sunday bonnet. Lord knows what mayhem awaits, but we can't wait to find out! / Cora Burke

 

September 21 2013


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€12

gig
Mainliner

Most people don’t know this, but in the mid 90s a crazed sect of psychedelic speed freaks from the Japanese underground tore a hole in the fabric of space. How? Simple: they staged a smash-n-grab on the hoary old blueprints laid down by 60s-era rock luminaries like Blue Cheer, Cream, the Stones, et al, juiced their gear with a direct line to the energy conduit powering the city of Mega-Tokyo, then funneled that megaton force into riffs to infinity. Children of the the flower-power era, when they resurrected the music of those failed ideals it came back as a snarling, serrated beast. They were a bunch of blackened hippies pulling rock moves at volumes undreamt of– Mainliner being just three of that crowd. Now they’re old men, but they haven’t mellowed. Quite the opposite– it’ll be a surprise if the Grand Social’s left standing. / Marcus O'Sullivan

 

September 21 2013


where
Sandymount Strand

when
11:59pm

how much
€10/€8

installation
4/704

Well, it's about time! We Are Islanders are returning to their natural habitat (the deep blue) in order to bring us lucky people 4/704, a majestic installation on Sandymount Strand in collaboration with Designgoat, Sean & Yvette, Slavec Kwi, and The Electro Band Collective. Expect powerful artistic exploitation of the nature that surrounds us, incredible photographic paste-ups on the walls of the old baths, and architectural splendour within. To experience this at its most potent, attend the guided walk of the installation as the witching moon oversees four of the 704 tides of the year. The rising tides are often things of doom - The Day After Tomorrow, or the threat of Carrie Bradshaw's Manhattan being drowned, but We Are Islanders are harnessing the eerie beauty for better.../ Kate Coleman

   
 

September 22 2013


where
Exam Hall, Public Theatre, Trinity College.

when
6pm

how much
€14/€16

fringe
Rites of Passge: Tour Guides to the Future

“Between a rock and a hard place is where diamonds get made.” The words of activist Marie Mulholland were used in a different context but her observations at Rites of Passage on Sunday were one of several jewels on display in this considered and heartening spectacle of pain and passion. The one jewel which returns to the final installment is the girls choir (100 strong) from St Brigid's in Killester who collaborate with Nina Hynes and a wonderful assembly of musicians to deliver cheek to cheek grins of delight on songs such as Nina’s uplighting anthem (The World). Last week it ran to three and a half hours, where a second didn’t feel wasted, and ended up with a mini-rave on the pews. I'm sure the dead eyes of august professors will reveal a twinkle as they gaze upon this astounding concoction of past, present and future. Win Tickets / Michael McDermott

 

September 22 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
13.45|16.10|20.40

how much
€7.60/€9

cinema
In A World

Hey bitches, listen up - in a world wear Miley Cyrus makes the front pages for some weird ass-wiggling, a gal can still make it without taking her clothes off. All she needs is good diction and a fine vocal timbre. This dramedy from girl'o'the'mo Lake Bell is seductively sweet, but with enough edge and girl-gone-wrong drama to stop you from vomming in your handbag. In A World also caused this writer to suffer a (swiftly aborted) crush on Demetri Martin, while Fred Melamed's guttural repetitions of "in a woooorld..." kinda justified his character's young, hot, wife. Way to go, man. This film has a lot to say, whether it's about double standards post-one-night-stand, expectations of appropriate female attire, or most importantly, of tokenism in the tough-ole entertainment industry. Oh, and squeaky infantile voices. Less of the upspeak, lads! (Unless you're Australian). / Kate Coleman

   
 

September 23 2013


where
National Photographic Archive, Meeting House Square, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
Until 6 October

how much
Free

exhibition
Pearse House: Village in the City

Casual vandalism defies the whiteness of the wall that runs up along the stairs of the National Photographic Archive: ‘Jeanette’ and ‘Mary’ scribbled in crayon, wanting you to know they were there; an X superimposed on ‘Mufc,’ suggesting a haste ‘Arsenal FC’ instead. Math sums too: 2+2=? Scraggly urban bramble intruding, loitering, shocking. One of the framed photographs explains: the doodles are replicas of those on a stairwell in Pearse House, the toothy subject of Jeanette Lowe’s exhibition, which she explores with neither condescension nor sentimentality. Smiles, timid kids in corners and gardens share space with ash trays – some brimming with grey, some impeccably tidy – glittered women dolled-up in acrylic, old people in repose. All at once a community representative of a wider net and a village unlike any other. / Olen Bajarias

   
 

September 24 2013


where
Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€12/€15

theatre
MacBeth

RADA’s finest have starred in the title role whilst Welles and Polanski both had a crack at bringing it to the silver screen – Macbeth is a biggy. Lesser productions have resembled a regicidal romp through an abattoir whereas Ian McKellen managed to portray the psychologically unstable general with a monumental icy frailty. It is Macbeth’s “vaulting ambition” that provides the basis of his hamartia and despite the maniacal actions of this treacherous brute, we consistently sympathise with him. Such historical baggage however has failed to thwart the aspirational and bright young things of Arclight who showcase their take on The Scottish Play (among superstitious thespians). Reawaken the quotes seared on your brain from Leaving Cert and recall the collected awkwardness felt as a teacher read aloud the “unsex me here” passage on Tuesday night. / Aaron Purcell

   
 

September 25 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€9

cinema
IFI & SET Collective - Tiny Furniture

SET launches Issue 03 with a screening of Tiny Furniture, Lena Dunham’s second pre-Girls tip-toeing foray into realism. Lisa Cassidy’s study of the film makes strongly felt the thesis pulse of the publication: that film sets aren’t merely arbitrary boxes out of which plot pounces and unravels, but rather are vital elements to any thorough and rounded appreciation of cinema. She locates an almost umbilical bond between Aura’s stumbling tries at getting up on her mature, postgraduate feet – Aura played by Dunham – and the expansive TriBeCa loft – played by Dunham’s own expansive TriBeCa loft – that all at once nourishes and resists her. Cassidy will be at hand to introduce the film before the screening, and attendees will receive copies of the issue itself. / Olen Bajarias

 

September 25 2013


where
The Back Loft, La Catedral Art Studios, 7-11 St Augustine St, Dublin 8


when
See link

how much
Free

festival
Dublin Live Art Festival

This festival does exactly what it says on the tin – celebrates live art. What is that, you may ask. Well, they welcome a diverse group of Irish and international guest artists and curators for performances, workshops, seminars and discussion. This isn’t just aimed at performers but at anyone with an interest in the medium and provides a very broad overview of the concept over the duration of the festival. If you are just starting out, organisers hope that the live performance workshops can offer a chance to explore and experiment with your art in a safe and supportive environment and if you are more of a voyeur just check out the shows. A testament to the creativity that we can all tap into if we wish, this should prove a truly enlightening few days for those with an interest... / Frances Winston

 

September 25 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
Free (advance sign-up)

talk
Banter: Living For The City - On Your Bike

"...most cyclists in Dublin do behave as I have outlined. They used to be a minority but not any more. #selfish #thugs" "Cyclists of Dublin ye do my head in ..." "There is a deep and sinister part of hell reserved exclusively for fucking Dublin cyclists." "Any studies done on why so many #cyclists in #Dublin are #ColourBlind ? #ArrogantTossers" "Cyclists in Dublin all need to be thrown out in front of a bus. wankpots." A quick twitter search threw up these lovely comments from people who think you don't deserve to get to work, go to the shops, or, god forbid, get some excercise on a two-wheeled vehicle that doesn't guzzle fossil fuels. Imagine that. If you are as incensed by this as I am, head to Banter's discussion on the issues facing cyclists, from theft to the sheer poor quality of the road system.  / Cora Burke

 
Jamie Delaney - Moving Images
Le Cool shoots with Newbridge native, Jamie Delaney, who has just signed with London production house Somesuch & Co. (Extended interview here). 

My back ground is Graphic Design but in 2010 I just got sick of it - way to much time sitting behind a Mac, so I got into film.

I am very much influenced by the American indie film from the 90s, Americana culture is a huge theme in my work, but I like to twist it. I've had a great year, working with Rejjie Snow, MMOTHS and others. But I get bored quickly and its better for me to keep working, writing and shooting stuff.

The music video genre is really important to young directors and production companies, especially those wanting to do commercials. Ad creatives don't care about the last toilet roll ad you did, but they all watch music videos and will remember them. A really good video is really important for an artist, it can take a track viral in a few days.

For an extended interview with Jamie and a selection of his work, GO HERE. PHOTO: Philip White