Dublin Selected *200

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For our 200th issue, there's no pomp and circumstance. We won't be hiring a blimp to traverse the Dublin skyline with a self-congratulatory message. No trumpets will trump and our throats won't lump as we mark this milestone issue.

What we will do is remember and thank all those who have got us this far, everyone who has penned a piece, designed a cover, taken a portrait or got in touch with cool suggestions or kind words to keep us going (almost) every week for over four years.

There's no fuss for us, it's business as usual. But we can't let that nice round number go without some sort of news, so here goes: As of October, we're delighted to add The Prowlster to our suite of sites. We'll be taking the reins from the McGinn sisters and their team - who have built up a loyal audience to their awesome online magazine - and develop Le Cool's new fashionable sister with the same exciting, creative content you've come to expect from the network of amazingly talented Irish people we've worked with over the past 200 issues.

There's no time for laurel resting around here, we're far hardier than that.

Who is giving you 200 reasons to love Dublin this week? Ciaran, Michael, Kate, Amy or Olen.
"The cover is to celebrate the 200th edition of Le Cool." - RedmanAKA
... Read More
   
 

September 26 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€12

cinema
The Great Hip Hop Hoax

The bigger the lie, the more people will believe, or in a more fun times way, if you have enough chutzpah you can get away with a stunning amount of mischief, bluffing and bullshit. Gavin Bain and Billy Boyd, college buddies and rap-stars-in-training, went for the nuclear option after being laughed out of a record label audition, labelled as “the rapping proclaimers”. They ditched the Dundee accents, invented a complex back story and relaunched themselves as Silibil ’n’ Brains, an “authentic” hip-hop duo from California. People started answering their calls, a buzz was built and they landed a record deal and a next big thing lifestyle. But when nothing is as it appears and success could break you, how long can you keep living a lie before the cracks begin to show and the whole house of cards falls down? Win Tickets / Kate McEvoy

 

September 26 2013


where
Abbey Theatre, 26 Lower Abbey St, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
€18/€25

theatre
Maeve's House

We were warned of the strobe lights at the beginning of the show – just to let us know, in case it might be a problem. An unnecessary precaution. Pre-precaution. What came was nowhere near seizure-inducing; it was, ahem, light years away from that, a whisper of mostly pink tickling the gentle face of Eamon Morrissey sitting on the Manhattan subway in the 1960s. He reads out fragments of short stories published in the New Yorker by Maeve Brennan, the gifted writer present throughout the play not as shadows beneath the ripples of Mr. Morrissey’s face but as the light that falls on memories stored cool under the creases – memories of the Ranelagh house they both grew up in, of ordinary Dublin, of ordinary New York, of ordinary life – warming them up so they fizz and expand and bloom on stage with the heft and feel of reality. / Olen Bajarias

   
 

September 26 2013


where
Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA), Royal Hospital, Kilmainham, Dublin 8.
Location Map

when
10am-5.30pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Leonora Carrington: The Celtic Surrealist

Frida Kahlo may have once referred to her as one of “those European bitches”, but Leonora Carrington’s legacy shouldn’t be limited to that slight. One of the few female members of the Surrealist boys’ club, Carrington has long been revered in Mexico, where she resided until her death. However, it is only in recent years that her achievements have come to be recognised on this side of the Atlantic. This despite the fact that her mother hails from Co. Westmeath and Celtic imagery figures heavily in her work. This retrospective, which is comprised of both paintings and sculptures, highlights the influence that both Celtic and Mexican folklore had on her work. (Think Día de los Muertos meets The Cattle Raid of Cooley.) Fantastical and dreamy, vivid and beguiling, consider it a long-overdue primer to Carrington and her magical world. / Amy O’Connor

 

September 26 2013


where
Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin 8


when
7:30pm

how much
€16/€14

concert
Towards Enlightenment

The Irish Baroque Orchestra get their autumn season underway with a programme entitled 'Towards Enlightenment'. The 18th Century, known as the 'Age of Enlightenment' gave the world much in terms of philosophy, the sciences and literature. Music was no exception, and this concert will feature some outstanding compositions from the period, including rare and intriguing works by CPE Bach, Quantz and Kirnberger. Anneke Scott is returning to the IBO to play Haydn's Horn Concerto in D Major. Guest conductor Roy Goodman is best known for his work with the English Chamber Orchestra and the European Union Baroque Orchestra. He has worked as guest conductor with over 120 orchestras and opera companies worldwide - from Carnegie Hall in New York to the Royal Albert Hall Proms in London and Sydney’s Opera House. / Des FitzGerald

   
 

September 27 2013


where
Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay D2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€18.50

gig
Wire

A band whose influence far outshines their modest record sales, Wire's arty experimentation and unorthodox song structures set them apart from their late 70s punk and post-punk contemporaries. Their edgy, stop-start guitar and drum interplay combined with rasping, deadpan vocals is an intense barrage of raucous sound. Wire take the DIY, less-is-more approach of early punk to extreme levels. This minimalism manifests itself in the form of songs that are rarely longer than two minutes, while their infectious hooks and choruses often go unrepeated. Their eagerness to push the boundaries of the punk genre never got in the way of them writing the odd stunning pop song, however, with classics such as Mannequin and Outdoor Miner sure to feature on the night. This is rock music distilled into its most condensed, intoxicating essence. / Oisin Leonard

 

September 27 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
8.40pm

how much
€10

cinema
Smash & Grab: The Story of the Pink Panthers

The pink panther may have started out as a discolouration in a large gem, but the idea soon became synonymous with rich playboys, bumbling French detectives and jewel thieves. It is the latter which concerns Havana Marking as she tells the hard-to-believe-it's-true tale of a network of European jewel thieves wanted throughout the world for diamond heists worth millions. Marking mixes testimony from the people involved with animations of their heists to portray robberies that make Ocean’s 12 look grounded and realistic. Marking has had previous success with the likes of Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer and Hell and Back Again, just ignore her involvement with Gordon Ramsay. Win Tickets / David Cadwallader

 

September 27 2013


where
Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
6.30pm

how much
€5

talk
Jhumpa Lahiri

The notoriously prickly Michiko Kakutani has written of Jhumpa Lahiri’s “copious gifts” as a writer, while the Pulitzer committee deemed her gifts copious enough to award her the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2000 for her short story collection, Interpreter of Maladies. At 32, she was and remains the youngest recipient of the prestigious citation. This year, she makes a long-awaited return with her sprawling, panoramic novel The Lowland, which follows the divergent paths taken by two Calcuttan brothers. Broader in scope than previous work, but lyrical as ever, the book has already been shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize and seems destined to be included on those impending year-end lists. This Friday, Lahiri will participate in the latest in a series of author talks by Gutter Bookshop and a book signing will follow. / Amy O’Connor

   
 

September 27 2013


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€15 (includes CD)

album launch
This is How we Fly

The combined talents of Irish musicians Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh and Seán Mac Erlaine, Swedish percussionist Petter Berndalen and Michigan dancer Nic Gareiss, contemporary folk collective This Is How We Fly originally came together for a 'once-off' gig, at the behest of Dublin Fringe Festival's Róise Goan. Three years on, in the week that Goan herself flies off to pastures new, the four-piece celebrate the launch of their debut album. Teaming traditional Irish melodies and Swedish folk rhythms with flourishes of electronica and improvised jazz, the group's genre-melding music is delivered with a lightness of touch that befits the name, with Gareiss's nimble-footed 'percussive dance' adding a spellbinding visual element to live shows. Admission to the launch includes a copy of the album. / Joey Kavanagh

 

September 27 2013


where
The Little Museum, 15 St. Stephen's Green Dublin 2


when
7pm

how much
€12

album launch
Chequerboard

What can you say when you love your friend? What can you say when your friend makes music which tugs at your heart strings and creates introspective pools of sheer beauty? What can you say when you know your friend has invested Gladwellian hours, above and beyond, in the perfection of their release? What can you say when it's taken them five years to release the follow up? You can start by saying you love them. You can start by saying you've cried listening to the ethereal beauty amplified when their fingers pluck those strings. This is my friend John Lambert. I love him. His music is a majestic time-out from our moments. This is the unfolding of him and us. It's a well of sound where the lights of our lives are glimmering and refracting. This is Chequerboard. / Michael McDermott

 

September 27 2013


where
Vicar Street, 58-59 Thomas Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€23

comedy
Adam Hills ''Happyism''

Adam Hills does not do cynicism. This Aussie's inherently sunny nature, due possibly to the fact that he has an abundance of Vitamin D, makes for the kind of stand up that embraces you with that warm fuzzy feeling that comes from the eruption of a proper belly laugh. 'Happyism' evidently follows this lead of good natured ribbing as Hills weaves amusing anecdotes with improvised audience participation and spontaneous musings. For those who prefer their stand up more sarcastic than side splitting this may sound too sugar coated to swallow, but he is the first to question his own comic relevance whilst tackling topics from racist slang to the paltry state of politics with an intelligence and self deprecating wit that is as thought provoking as it is entertaining. / Sophie Donaldson

   
 

September 28 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10

screening
Muscle Shoals

You know, just once I'd like to watch a documentary about music I love without Bono turning up to bestow his imprimatur like some benevolent pope of pop. Unfortunately the beshaded one's patented ability to reduce many of the greatest songs ever recorded to the same vaguely mystical twaddle is still on show in Muscle Shoals. Don't let that put you off though, Greg Camalier's film is really about the little guy - the unassuming men who were the engine room behind a bewildering array of soul classics in the 1960s and 70s. Prepare to have your mind comprehensively boggled as you realise that all those records (and you'll be able to hum the entire soundtrack) were produced by one small band of musicians and one genius producer in one small town in Alabama. P.S. Lose the sunglasses Bono, you're 53. / Conor McDevitt

 

September 28 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
1.15pm | 3.45pm | 6.15pm

how much
€7.60/€9

cinema
Hannah Arendt

German director Margarethe von Trotta is fond of making biopics about kick-ass German women. Her most recent movie focuses on one of the most turbulent and controversial times in the life of political theorist, Hannah Arendt. You might think that a film about a philosopher might not exactly be a rip-roaring affair but Hannah Arendt ain't your average egghead. A German-Jewish emigré to New York, Arendt approached the New Yorker and offered to cover the '61 trial of Adolf Eichmann, one of the main Nazi orchestrators of the Holocaust. Expecting pure evil, Arendt was faced with a confusingly mediocre bureaucrat; a revelation that gave rise to her famous theory, 'The Banality of Evil'. Using real trial footage, the movie encourages viewers to come to their own critical conclusions. This'un's a real thinker. / Carrie King

 

September 28 2013


where
13 N. Great George's Street, Dublin 1
Location Map

when
7:30pm & 10pm

how much
€12/€10 (prebook)

gig
Bottlenote Music Festival

Spurred on by a new wave of inventive creative organisers and promoters, the days of throwing a gig together in an established venue like Whelans are long gone, and the Bottlenote Festival is sitting happily and squarely in the camp of invention. Now in its fourth year, the festival’s remit is to present Dublin’s leading improvisational musicians and as such is curated by three of those in Shane Latimer, Justin Carroll and Sean Mac Erlaine. Least we get sucked into images of impossibly aloof beatnik’s dressed in black polo necks, sipping moody glasses of red wine and thumbing through worn copies of Kerouac between epic jazz flute solos in the smokey back room of a bar, The Bottlenote crew have appropriated an appropriately run down Georgian house as the venue. / Emmet Condon

 

September 28 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
12pm

how much
€25

event
District54: Vice Coffee Tasting Class

Vice coffee, located in the Twisted Pepper on lower Abbey Street, is a coffee emporium run by Tom Stafford, an affable chap with an encyclopaedic knowledge of fine brews. He is also determined to educate anyone with an interest in the subject in the ways of the black stuff, beginning with tasting sessions from his base at the TP bar. Prepare your palate, cos it'll be taken on a rollercoaster ride of taste sensations. Tom will talk you through the different roasts, methods of brewing, and how different brewing methods change the taste of your coffee. If you don't go home resolved to invest in aeropresses, coffee filters, moka pots and syphon burners and become a one-man (or lady) coffee shop, we'll be shocked and disappointed. / Kate Coleman

 

September 28 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10pm

how much
€13/€15

gig
Marcel Fengler & Greg Wilson

At first glance the combination of Marcel Fengler and Greg Wilson almost seems a minsnomer. Fengler is another of Berghain’s residents, who are as ubiquitous as the disused power-station itself in terms of the iconography of the current techno scene. Fully and truly embracing the Berlin club’s reputation for relentless, transportive productions, Fengler is not for the faint hearted but no doubt rewards those who decide to pack their bags and go with him. Wilson, on the other hand, is riding a different wave – the sudden re-emergence of disco has played into the veteran’s hands, and nobody is better placed than he to comment on it (see his great essay on the current state of the scene here) or to play an edit laden evening bridging the gap between his original disco roots to the here and now. Not to be missed. / Emmet Condon

   
 

September 29 2013


where
Olympia Theatre, 72 Dame Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
€29

gig
Laura Marling

Laura Marling has grown up from the girl who sang backing vocals for Noah and the Whale. Still only a young'un at 23, she's now on her fourth studio album, Once I Was an Eagle. Marling's unique vocals, mature lyricism and delicate instrumentation give uncanny weight to her songs, many of which deal with relationships, mental health, and ideas of femininity and independence. Often described as an 'old soul', each song seems both considered and effortless, tapping into gravity and levity with equal skill and aplomb. I'm really looking forward to this gig. And the beautiful Olympia Theatre is always a special treat! / Carrie King

 

September 29 2013


where
National Concert Hall, 2 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2,
01 417 0077‎
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€22/€37/€45€49

concert
Sinatra - The Voice of the Century

Whether on the backlot of Warner Bros or crooning at Atlantic City’s 500 Club, Ol’ Blue Eyes made it anywhere and everywhere. Considering the levels of talent, charisma and style present in his being, this was unsurprising and of course didn’t go unnoticed by any section of society. As chairman of the Rat Pack, those permitted into the fold leveraged off his unbridled genius while even the prince of prep himself, JFK, availed of Frank’s suave services in order to get a foot into the Oval Office. However, what endures above everything else is the voice… Let The Chris Dean Big Band Orchestra and Singers melt away your little town blues as they revisit the torch songs, ballads and classics of Sinatra’s stellar yet often tumultuous life in music. Go be a part of it…/ Aaron Purcell

 

September 29 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
12.15pm | 8.40pm

how much
€8.60/€10

cinema
Mister John

Jerry receives news that his brother John has drowned. He can’t seem to react. He travels to Singapore, a place apparently peopled by women who can’t stand straight, bent instead against gaudy bar walls like curved, inviting index fingers. He can’t seem to indulge. He finds his sister-in-law, tries on his brother’s old clothes, all ill-fitting. He can’t seem to mourn. There is a disconnect. But, like a mantra imposed, his brother’s death braces Jerry’s neck stiff: eyes wandering to easy things impaled, all distractions dissolve, and the silence that that affords a bubble lifting frays from his life – a bad marriage, the weight of what seems like existential ennui – blue and formless from submersion, up to the surface of his consciousness, where they knot into clear, defined shapes that demand to be examined. / Olen Bajarias

   
 

September 30 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
13.45|16.00|18.20| 20.30

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
Blue Jasmine

"Xanax: The Movie". There is so much pill-canister rattling that you might momentarily feel like you're playing the maracas in Tijuana. Pill-popping aside, this film follows Jasmine, a Park Avenue princess whose marriage and fortune have crumbled, leaving her a nervous wreck, talking to herself in the streets, and carted off to hospital for Edison's medicine. She moves in with her sister, Ginger, whose expectations of life are far less extravagant. Jasmine may criticise her sister for not aiming higher, but the irony of how her own advantageous marriage has left her - penniless, emotionally fragile, and bewilderingly unattached to reality, make for interesting watching. Also, keep an eye out for Andrew Dice Clay, doing something other than yelling misogynistic nursery rhymes for once... / Kate Coleman

 

October 01 2013


where
White Lady Art Gallery, 14 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2


when
12pm-6pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Holy Smokes and Cereal Killers

Take a specific kid: nerve endings explosive; impressionable like a Vaseline-coated white sheet flailing on a clothesline, exposed, a litmus test for pollution; an alien – any kid, really – stickers at hand from cereal boxes, some crayons – at nana’s house (who’s asleep) – bored – with no video games! Seeing the exhibition, one might guess Andy Hamilton, aka MyTarPit, was (and still is) such a kid. His work: uninspired nature landscapes one might find at your granny’s or a flea market jolted to buzzing life by neon colour and stickers and acrylic swathes of fantastic creatures leaping from the throbbing lab of his imagination; recycled ad slogans from breakfast cereals kneaded into wry lashes at blind capitalism; a comic strip called ‘Digital Crumbs’ along the walls, a charming running narrative of the work’s conception. / Olen Bajarias

 

October 01 2013


where
Axis Ballymun, Main Street, Ballymun Dublin 9.
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€12 / €15

talk
Doug Allen: Life Behind the Lens

We’ve all winced and grimaced from the comfort of our sofas as a pride of lions round up and maul a herd of elephants, as a polar bear rips the flesh of a seal or a falcon snatches a baby from a pram. Doug Allan has been there, up close and personal, peering down the lens of his camera. Having worked on BBC series such as Blue Planet, Planet Earth and Life in the presence of God (aka Sir David Attenborough), Allan is well versed in the notions of nature. A former diver and scientist, this Scotsman has braved the polar ice caps to capture insights into all creatures great and small including polar bears who are “big sexy charismatic animals which also might just eat you.” Tonight, on a speaking tour for his new book Freeze Frame. Allan will reveal the often solitary existence of the wildlife cameraman. Win Tickets / Michael McDermott

 

October 01 2013


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€15

talk
Howard Marks

I've met Mr. Marks, AKA Mr Nice, a couple of times now, but the first time was the best. He was the special guest at a college debate where I delivered a rambling, loose, ill-advised and poorly researched paper that tried to connect the legal history of marijuana to the newspaper empire of William Randolph Hearst. Had Howard and I not spent the earlier part of that day sampling some of Dublin's 'finest', late 90s weed, my debating opponent that night - Ivana Bacik - might not have torn both me and my speech a new one. But then, I wouldn't trade that sticky-eyed, foggy-brained, leisurely walk through Dublin with his Welsh-fused musing in my ear for anything. If only I could remember what he said. If you haven't been at one of his frequent Dublin events before, it's probably time. Trust me, he has a big draw. / Ciaran Walsh

   
 

October 02 2013


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€23

gig
CocoRosie

Oftentimes more well known for their interesting choice of stage costumes than their music, CocoRosie’s latest exploit, Tales of A Grass Widow may just change all that. The pair are explosively expressive, creating songs that would leave one believing they were listening to the audio translations of a child's dreams of magic, notwithstanding their consistent tinge of grotesque, nightmarish qualities too. Using toys alongside more traditional musical instruments (guitars, harps, you know, that kinda thing), the sister's live shows are a mishmash of aural and visual oddities. Downright creepy at times, these ladies will take you on a walk through an emotive whirlwind of horrific fantasy with a performance you're not likely to forget anytime soon. Win Tickets / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

 
Thirty Moore Years!

To celebrate Temple Bar Gallery + Studios 30th Anniversary former studio member, Pádraic E. Moore, is putting on a unique night of home-grown visual art and music.

For the last 10 years, I’ve been working as a cultural producer. Dublin has been very generous towards me. Some years ago I was given a curatorial residency in Temple Bar and they asked me back for this event as someone who is massively passionate about music.

I do think it’s very important sometimes for music to be experienced in an art context because there are a lot of subtleties in music that often don’t get acknowledged. There are going to be some visuals (Cats Byrne) but there won’t be an exhibition. I feel that the tone of some of the music and the machines that the bands (Catscars, Diamond Dagger, Ships, Lazertom) use look back to acts that were active when this institution was founded.

Ultimately, music is energy; it’s vibrations and it’s much more inclusive in ways that the visual arts sometimes isn’t, because it can sometimes be too cerebral whereas music is more immediate.

Celebrations kick off on Saturday 28th at 7.30pm. €10. BYOB (no glass bottles!). For extended interview, CLICK HEREPHOTO: Des Moriarty