Dublin Selected *203

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As Dublin finds itself in the first proper rainy daze of the year, it's time to think again of her indoors. The natural reaction is to stay inside, venturing out only for the essentials; work (if you have some), smokes (if you can afford them) and drink (if you've taken to it). Seasonal affective disorder gives the best of us inertia, but we are here to tempt you out of your cubby hole with not only this issue but also a ram-jammed Autumn schedule of events - that we have varying degrees of involvement in - to pique your curiosity and get you out of the prison of your mind. It's our autumn of content...

Malcolm Gladwell in the RDS (Nov 1st)
The Finishing School Series with Gill & McMillan
The Mess It Up Exhibition (Nov 7th)
End of Time (as part of Science Expression)
An event for national Science Week (Nov 14th)
Le Cool Bram Stoker Walk (Oct 26th)
Pop Up Events at Web Summit
FOMO (Nov 7th)
The Animators LP launch (Nov 21st)
Spiel 3 (Dec 3rd)
Wild Turkey Mash Up (Dec TBC)

Woah, we think we need a lie down. Who are your calendar pin ups this week? Ciaran, Michael, Kate, Amy, Olen, Molly
"It's part of the 'Chair' story/project." - Donal Moloney
... Read More
   
 

October 17 2013


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€15

gig
Shangaan Electro

Take a beat-up taxi 30 minutes outside Johannesburg city to arrive at a Soweto shopping centre where you're greeted by a jovial South African man who calls himself Dog. He escorts you in his beat-up car deep into the heart of Soweto suburbs. Turning a corner into a residential shanty town, you encounter a crowd of locals corralling a carnival of coloured costumed dancers who move to the high tempo music blasting from the street speakers. The music is electronic: 180BPM frenzied rhythms, marimbas, digital percussion and uplifting vocals with whistles and samples underneath. Dog is also known as Nozinja, and he makes all the music known as Shangaan Electro for the groups who dance in the Soweto sun. He'll be joined by his some of them in The Sugar Club on Thursday night for a glimpse into this unique dance music of South Africa. Win Tickets / Nialler9

 

October 17 2013


where
The Joinery, 6 Rosemount Terrace, Arbour Hill
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
Free

event
One Night Stands - Sonya Kelly

"You can read it out loud at home but you don't hear it being heard" is how Sonya Kelly explains the benefits of road testing her latest work in progress as part of this series. Anywhere Else but Here continues the autobiographical tragi-comic strand first explored in The Wheelchair on My Face. Now Sonya is recounting the limbo land of dealing with immigration whilst seeking a defacto visa for her Australian partner Kate. "Instead of sitting in bed having pizza at two in the afternoon, you have to assemble a dossier of bona fide evidence proving you've been together for two years - letters, photographs, Christmas cards. It's quite a humbling experience." Half-written at this stage with a view to staging it in 2014, Sonya will be using tonight to shape the architecture of the rest of it. "When you tell people in public you're doing it, then you really have to." / Michael McDermott

 

October 17 2013


where
Chester Beatty Library, Dublin Castle, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
5pm

how much
Free

screening
The Seventh Seal

In Medieval Sweden a disillusioned knight - Antonius Black (Max Von Sydow) - returns from the crusades to find his country ravaged by the black plague. To prolong his own life while he seeks answers to his profound questions about eternity, Antonius plays a fatal game of chess against the shrouded figure of death (Bengt Ekerot). This high-ranking black & white classic is considered a timeless allegory and a masterpiece of cinematography. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the film, you’ve probably seen countless Grim Reaper chess homages and parodies across film, television and popular culture. This is a good place to start for someone looking for a little less gore and something more macabre leading up to Halloween. / Conor McTernan

   
 

October 17 2013


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
3:30pm|6:00pm

how much
€6-€9

cinema
The Crash Reel

There is a scene in Lucy Walker’s The Crash Reel in which Kevin Pearce, a former Olympic snowboarder grappling with a traumatic brain injury, is in his therapist’s office. She asks him how he feels, and as he rocks back and forth in a chair, antsy, he quietly confides that he wishes that it could all be fixed. When she calls on him to elaborate, he says that he just wants to be able to get gas for his car without worrying about whether he can do it or not. It’s a quiet scene, but a deeply powerful insight into the aftermath of an traumatic brain injury. To anybody who saw Wasteland, it won't come as a surprise that Lucy Walker has come up trumps again with another fine piece of work. Like Senna, The Crash Reel transcends the sports doc genre and winds up being one of the most compelling, engaging and affecting documentaries of the year. / Amy O'Connor

 

October 17 2013


where
The Science Gallery, Trinity College, Pearse Street, Dublin 2
01 896 4091‎
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
Free - booking essential

talk
The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets

PI IS EXACTLY THREE! Got your attention? Frothing at the mouth, waving your protractor, sucking on the end of a pencil poised to solve Fermat’s Last Theorem? If so, Simon Singh, author of lots of science-type books, has something for you. For he knows that miniature golf is not the only useful place for geometry and that the Simpsons’ writers have been packing the show with math gags since the first episode. Singh interviewed a whole host of Simpson writers for his book The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets and is in town to guide us through Springfield’s budding math community. Despite the show's slight decline in quality over the years, we should enjoy the Simpsons while we can; it won’t go on forever, because in this house, we obey the laws of thermodynamics. / Hugh Torpey

 

October 17 2013


where
Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA), 15 Ely Place, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
5pm

how much
Free

launch
We Are Islanders

The Design Shop at the RHA has been head of table for a smorgasbord of design pop ups, and this week We Are Islanders and Redress are the centrepiece. The 4/704 project studied the rise and fall of our tides culminating in an audio visual installation and garments dyed on the Sandymount Strand. This will be showcased in store alongside other conceptual designs born through a process of marrying traditional craftwork and materials such as fair trade cotton, organic salmon leather and Irish wool. The focus here is on the journey rather than the final product, resulting in garments literally woven with a gamut of social, political and environmental probings and musings, while the garment and its wearer are utilised as an artistic platform. Not just a pretty face, Thursday's launch is certainly a destination of note. / Sophie Donaldson

 

October 17 2013


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10

gig
Maud In Cahoots

Keavy, Edele and Shane. John and Edward. Samantha and Omero. Stephen and Tony. Irish pop music has a decidedly chequered history of sibling synchronicity but, with our pop landscape looking especially barren of late, Dublin sisters Maud and Zoe Reardon are a radiant beacon of hope. Combining luscious chamber-pop arrangements with melancholy melodies worthy of the most lovelorn of Scandinavian chanteuses, Maud in Cahoots occupy a point on the musical spectrum quite apart from the production-line pap pedaled by Louis Walsh. They’re one of Dublin’s best kept musical secrets, but that might have something to do with never having played a headline gig here until now. With support from the eminently talented Leanne Harte, this is shaping up to be the kind of family affair Mary J would want to sing about. / Joey Kavanagh

   
 

October 18 2013


where
Abbey Theatre, 26 Lower Abbey St, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€13-€45

theatre
The Hanging Gardens

‘The approach to the garden is mountainous and it is built tier upon tier. The result is that it looks like a theatre.’ This is an historical account of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, and The Hanging Gardens of the Abbey Theatre do not differ as they stage a play orchestrated for audience and cast members alike. A writer and his wife, their gardens and estate and fledged children are important reminders of the interconnectedness of family life and of the total immersion of crisis-focused drama when acted out in the private sphere. Frank McGuinness’ play is a thematic discussion of the patriarchal aristocracy of the wise, of psychological and familial maturation and of the ‘home truths’ that are often overlooked in favour of domestic stability. Family crises bring a family together and can be as dramatic as anything acted out on stage... / Aisling Smyth

 

October 18 2013


where
National Concert Hall, 2 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2,
01 417 0077‎
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10-€35

concert
Big on Britten: Britten & America

This year is Benjamin Britten's centenary, and the RTÉ Symphony Orchestra is celebrating in some style with the second in a series entitled Big on Britten. Born in the fishing port of Lowestoft in Suffolk, on England’s east coast, the sea always had a strong pull on Britten, and the Four Sea Interludes is the the most outstanding example of this influence. Composed as orchestral pieces to divide the opera Peter Grimes: Dawn; Sunday Morning; Moonlight and Storm capture the North Sea in all its moods. Britten spent the early part of WWII in America, and the concert reflects this with Bernstein’s On the Town (Three Dance Episodes) and Copland’s ballet score Appalachian Spring. Britten’s Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings, based on a selection of six nocturnal poems by, among others, Blake, Jonson and Keats also features. / Des FitzGerald

   
 

October 18 2013


where
Unitarian Church, St Stephen's Green West, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€12

gig
Deptford Goth

Every now and then you will hear a song so transformative that it makes you feel like Dawson from Dawson’s Creek. I don’t mean that music can transport you into the body of an over-read, existential teen quarterback. I mean it in terms of, regardless of your state of being, your emotions are hijacked by the sheer universality of the tales being told about the lives we live. Union by Deptford Goth is one such song. It caught me off guard late one spring night, the weight of isolation contained within the verses is shot through with a chorus made of the softest possible lightning bolt of hope in the form of soaring synth stabs. It manages to break your heart and lift your soul all at once. He makes songs to be cherished on lonely canal walks, or to be heard in the hushed magnificence of places like the Unitarian Church. / Emmet Condon

 

October 18 2013


where
Green On Red Gallery, 26-28 Lombard Street East, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
Until 2nd November

how much
Free

exhibition
Ronan McCrea

For his second exhibition at the gallery, Ronan McCrea joins the whole world in its collective revisit of the 90s, but he elects to bring down from the attic copies of Frieze magazine instead of the oversized distressed stuff. These he marks with metallic tape – clogging the flow of texts, highlighting trivia, changing the narrative of photographs, re-purposing old words (in one page he blocks out every other word that isn’t ‘Thanks Jeffrey Deitch’) – transforming the publication from a record of art scene of that time, into an album of his personal experience of history. Visitors are welcome to flip through these relics. Chairs are supplied – warmth, too. On another wall are prints of disembodied titles – ironic exploration of the history of art. One reads: ‘A New Reality: Black and White Photography in Contemporary Art.’ / Olen Bajarias

 

October 18 2013


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
1.30pm | 4.10pm | 6.30pm | 9.05pm

how much
€6-€9

cinema
Enough Said

As someone who would exclusively watch films about wealthy Angelenos if she could (see: the entire oeuvre of Nancy Meyers), Enough Said immediately appealed to all my interests. And on the surface, this might just seem like another film featuring people swanning around their idyllic houses with bougie complaints, such as inefficient maids and irritating ex-husbands. At its heart, however, Enough Said is a simply executed romance that offers commentary on empty-nest syndrome, marriage and life after divorce. With Julia Louis-Dreyfus, queen of television, and the late James Gandolfini, titan amongst men, at the fore, it's an alternately lovely and bittersweet film that will make you laugh, squirm and perhaps get a little something in your eye. / Amy O'Connor

   
 

October 19 2013


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
11pm

how much
€5

gig
Forrests & Snakehips

Dublin duo Forrests look set to take over The Button Factory tonight with their biggest live show to date, following a hair raising and body swaying display at Electric Picnic, which made Irish electronic enthusiasts sit up and take note. Tracks such as Tarifa, Billions and Latitude from their recent Wilder EP have encouraged early comparisons to the likes of Fuck Buttons and M83, as it seems things can only get better for the pair. Expect nothing less than cosy ambient electronica. Not to be forgotten on the night are soulful UK duo Snakehips, whose warm and smooth productions have been causing a massive stir over the past year. With their breakthrough track On & On, along with their addictive and velvety catalogue of remixes including Bondax’s Gold and Banks’ Warm Water, this is shaping up to be a very nice night for the ears indeed. Win Tickets / Philip Notaro

 

October 19 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10:30pm

how much
€15

gig
Fish Go Deep

Time sure flies when you're having fun. Veteran Producers Greg Dowling and Shane Johnson played an insular part in founding the house music scene in Cork in the late 80s before going on to achieve international acclaim for their music, featured on dozens of compilations and set up two international record labels. Still on the cutting edge, the duo are celebrating their 25th anniversary as deep house outfit Fish Go Deep this year, and Bodytonic are getting in on the festivities by bringing the Cork natives to the capital for Beatyard. A Banter conversation is also taking place beforehand at 6.30pm. Admission to the talk is free but you will need to sign up. Colourful Brooklyn duo Blondes will also be lavishing our ears with treats on the night. This is sure to be a night of euphoric Chicago and deep house classics. / Conor McTernan

   
 

October 19 2013


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10

album launch
Lisa O'Neill

If you are not yet acquainted with the unique stylings of Lisa O'Neill, look no further than her rendition of Dreaming, as performed at her Christmas show in Whelan's last year and captured by Myles O'Reilly. With her setlist written on a torn Topshop bag, it may seem like a ramshackle affair, but once she starts singing, it's clear that the diminutive Cavan native possesses a talent that is singular and undeniable. Her raw, powerful timbre is a welcome respite from the breathy vocals that are so pervasive among the current breed of female singer-songwriters, while her lyrics are poetic and steeped in the Irish storytelling tradition. This intimate gig will herald the arrival of her sophomore album, Same Cloth or Not. Prepare to have the hairs stand up on the back of your neck. Win Tickets / Amy O'Connor

 

October 19 2013


where
Sweeney's Bar, 32 Dame Street Dublin 2


when
2pm

how much
€5 & Clothes For Swappin'

fashion
Clothes Swap Night

There are moments in life that require somewhat rash decision making. Times when the pressure is on, a relentless countdown is making a steady decline towards its conclusion and the final choice is left to you- to bid, or not to bid. For many, these moments will culminate in a guilty mountain of Ebay 'bargains' most commonly found stashed at the back of a wardrobe, and now is your chance to haul them out from the depths and down to Sweeneys for the most enjoyable de-clutter imaginable. A fiver in and you can swap your trash for treasure whilst grooving to some super tunes, cocktail in one hand and the other elbow deep in potential new threads. And if you've more shelf space than excess apparel fear not, head down and nab yourself some fresh new finery that is sure to take pride of place in your very top drawer. / Sophie Donaldson

   
 

October 20 2013


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€18

gig
Edmar Castaneda

Put aside your prejudices because Edmar Castaneda pushes the harp in a totally new direction. We’re used to the gentle chamber music of the Irish harp, noble and moving. There's also a great tradition of harp playing in South America, and Columbian Castaneda brings a different style of playing to the harp. It's thrillingly percussive; plucking dynamic bass lines effortlessly with one hand while weaving complex counterpoint melodies with the other. His blend of jazz, Colombian folk tunes and flamenco style have given him an international reputation as one of the most original musicians on the jazz scene. He has single-handedly transformed the arpa llanera, or Colombian harp, into one amazing instrument. Now based in New York, he's worked with trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, guitarist John Scofield and Irish singer Susan McKeown. / Des FitzGerald

 

October 20 2013


where
Seomra Spraoi, 10 Belvedere Court, Dublin 1
Location Map

when
12 - 6pm

how much
See link.

celebration
Forgotten Zine Archive

As long as people have shelves, they'll buy magazines to put on them. Similarly, as long as there is culture, there will be counter-culturalists and in the Venn diagram where shelves and counter-culture exists, there is the zine. For at least 40 years, Ireland's bedroom publishers, ranters, ravers and DIY designers have created a zine scene. And we would have lost it all were it not for the Forgotten Zine Archive. Starting out of a North Wall warehouse in 2004 it was mainly kept Lost Ark Style in storage bar a few outings, including as part of Sarah Pierce's Ireland entry at the Venice Biennale in 2005. Now it raises it's ink-blotched, hand-bound, grubby greatness for this day of zinester goodness. Release the punk publisher in you from the cluttered blogosphere. / Myra Glass

 

October 20 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
16.10|20.25

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
Prince Avalanche

Alvin and Lance are two highway road-workers. Alvin has an over active imagination, he is learning German via tape while he works to “provide” for his future family. Lance is a horny reject with a big heart. He gets bored easily and doesn’t really like it out in the woods. Set against the backdrop of Bastrop State Park in central Texas during a devastating period of fires in 1988, this is a story about two men running away from their lives, into nature in search of misadventure. Adapted from a little-known 2011 Icelandic comedy, Either Way, and starring Emile Hirsch and Paul Rudd, this is a raw, melancholic, character-driven nugget of gold. The chemistry between Hirsch and Rudd is undeniable, and Into The Wild fans will be pleased to see Hirsch running around in the woods once again. / Conor McTernan

 

October 20 2013


where
The Joinery, 6 Rosemount Terrace, Arbour Hill
Location Map

when
10am

how much
€60

workshop
The Book

Compact digital cameras are most people’s photographic mainstay – being a blend of usability and portability that’s perfect for when you want to get up close and personal with your subjects. Unfortunately, their compactness sacrifices a lot of functionality – macro and micro lens magnification included. So, while they’re small and fit snugly in your pocket, they probably won’t be able to take fine-print shots of the insides of said pockets, no matter how threadbare and exposed their filaments are. This is where the DSLR comes in handy. For all you shutterbugs out there with a DSLR in the hand but no grip on its intricacies there is help in the form of Miranda Driscoll and The Joinery. Here Driscoll focuses on exposure, composition and light with practice-based learning that is underpinned by a good solid theoretical framework. It’s really quite illuminating. / Aisling Smyth

   
 

October 21 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
16.15|20.45

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
Very Extremely Dangerous

It is a question I'm sure many of us have posed in those still, honest moments before sleep takes us - should I have pursued a career as a musician or as an armed robber? What outcomes might have accrued, what women might I have enjoyed, pistols I may have toted…Well, Jerry McGill has lived these lives so you don't have to. At 70 years of age the former 'Sun'recording artist, ex-con and general rootin' tootin' southern sonofabitch' decides to return to music, and Irish filmmaker Paul Duane rides shotgun to document the madness. It is a measure of the director's dexterity that McGill can elicit any sympathy whatever, even on the run from his own terminal cancer, the motherfucker is still mean as a cut snake. The film barrels along with visceral force. Not your average redemption story. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

October 21 2013


where
Vicar Street, 58-59 Thomas Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€28

comedy
Much A-Stew About Nothing

For most of us, actively cultivating an embittered, angry public persona wouldn't exactly work in our favour, but then there's Stewart Lee, who's made a career out of being a bit of a curmudgeon. An exemplary stand up, he's a comedic stalwart for those in the know. With material that champions his far reaching, liberal intelligence, he creates absurd meta-narratives to envelop his audience, urging them to view the world more critically. By relishing his negative press and using such nasty nuggets on promotional material. The early haterz that eschewed his 'student humour' must be full of remorse, now that he's gone more Private Eye than Fist Of Fun... Win Tickets / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

   
 

October 22 2013


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
The Epic of Everest

The annoying thing about the Mars Rover is that it is a robot. Great achievement of science it may be, but it is no substitute for the idea of the first footprint on an unknown land. For several decades now we’ve been robbed of true human expedition and discovery - even those on the Space station can tweet at us daily. This film of George Mallory’s attempt on Everest is something to be savoured. By the third decade of the last century mankind had already reached both poles, and we had even taken to the skies in our flying machines. Everest was the last unknown, like the Polar Regions many had already lost their lives attempting to conquer her, but that danger is the attraction. There was no Everest Rover, just some soul who embraced the unknown with a simple bow of the head and the brave outstretching of the first step. / David Cadwallader

 

October 22 2013


where
Kerlin Gallery, Anne's Lane, South Anne Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until 9 November

how much
Free

exhibition
Mop - Sam Keogh

I remember Sam Keogh's NCAD grad show in 2009. All polymorphous neon crystalline forms, a pink stick, a giant pencil drawing of Errol Flynn as Robin Hood. It was baffling to me. He graduated with stellar marks, and the show has remained in my mind. He's regularly referenced as one of Ireland's fine young artists. Mop, his first solo show in the Kerlin Gallery, is an expedition into the gleeful, dark heart of Oscar the Grouch. At least, I think that's what it is. The thing I find with Keogh's work is that on one level it seems utterly incomprehensible, but on another it is deeply reminiscent of the colours and shapes and dim sensations of early childhood. There's something visceral yet subversively childlike about Mop, which makes for compulsive viewing, and this piece makes for excellent reading before you go. / Alex Calder

   
 

October 23 2013


where
Chester Beatty Library, Dublin Castle, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
2pm

how much
Free

screening
Coco Before Chanel

Chanel is one of the biggest fashion brands in the world, recognised for its quilted handbags, embroidered woollen suits and classic perfumes. But how many people know the story of the woman behind the label? Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel, portrayed by Audrey Tautou, is quite an unsympathetic character. Stubborn and aloof – the embodiment of a French cliché - she swans around in clouds of cigarette smoke, pouting and sulking. Yet you can’t help but admire her determination; through sheer ambition and opportunism, Coco revolutionises women’s fashion, banishing the frills, fuss and stifling corsets of the 19th century and opting instead for a casual, liberated and elegant style. Anne Fontaine’s unsentimental yet beautiful biopic shows us how this incredible femme fought her way to the top. / Kayla Walsh

 

October 23 2013


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
Free

competition
Barista Jam

Forget Portland, Dublin is where it’s at on the coffee front these days. Thanks to an urban tribe of colourful and obsessive aficionados, a burgeoning culture of bean enthusiasts has emerged throughout the capital. This specialist community and their respective establishments provide the discerning coffee drinker with a welcome alternative to the ubiquitous emerald green siren that seduces the city’s caffeine depleted masses into her multiple and generic premises on a daily basis. You can see the Olympian-like dedication to the art of free pouring for yourself as 16 competitors slug it out at the barista equivalent of a Royal Rumble - The Latte Art Throwdown. Tastings, demos from roasters, grub from Gruel Gorilla and the usual stellar selection of in-house libations make this event the perfect spectator sport. / Aaron Purcell

   
 
Hare Ye! Hare Ye!

Fiona Hallinan and Katie Sanderson are the dashing duo behind The Hare, the pop-up kitchen, as part of The Workers Cafe project.

Temple Bar Gallery and Studios wanted to do something to mark the 1913 Lockout by setting up an exhibition where artists could get paid for their work directly. I (Fiona) was invited by Rayne, the curator, to do the food part. 

I did some research and in September 1913, there was a ship which brought provisions to the workers from the UK called The Hare which I thought would be a great name. I had done work with Katie before and invited her to be the head chef. I worked on design and we developed the menus together. 

We wanted to keep things minimal aesthetically but do something special, refined and simple with the food which is based on what we want to eat - seasonal, bright, exciting, vegetarian food.

Me and Fink only became friends this year but the cafe has both of our personalities in it. We make little bowls for each other with yummy bits and we've just put that on the menu.

The Hare at the Workers Cafe runs until November 2nd. Pic: Oliver Kehoe Smith