Dublin Selected *213

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There was a constant stream of folk poking their heads into Number 10-11 Earl Street South yesterday evening. Located off the brilliant bonkers bustle that is Meath Street, the space and surrounds are basic to say the least. Little more than four walls and a ceiling but there was one important hook.

Its fixed rental price tag is €50 a month for 5 years under the DCC Vacant Spaces scheme. Do the maths and you’ll realise that €3k rental is a pittance and affords the successful party to invest in the development of the space. A glance at those popping in, as well as registering, testified to the scope and scale of interest.

The integration of arts organisations into communities is paramount for the meaningful rejuvenation of any part of the city. For a real impact, this scheme needs to be rolled out like the bike one with more frequency and fervour balanced with good judgment. Next week there’s three vacant units on Portland Street North. It could be you!

This issue is dedicated to Steve Doogan. Our mentor, guru, resident illustrator and 9/11 conspiracy theorist who leaves to join Block T. On that note, chaps anyone? MichaelCiaranKate, Amy, Oisin, or Maxime?

"This cover is an homage to a shop in Finglas." - Gordon Bent
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January 23 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
Until January 24th

how much
Varies

festival
Digital Biscuit

In the multi-faceted society of today, individual creativity is paramount in setting yourself apart from your versatile mate Jack (of all trades) -That granted, communication is what puts things into perspective, flinging opening the stage door to inspiration and accessibility. Enter Digital Biscuit - it aims to provide a breeding grounds for film-makers/producers/buffs and enthusiasts hailing from outside the industry alike to gather for a series of professional talks and workshops over the course of three interactive days. From a Skype session with the director of Mad Men to a showcasing of the latest ARRI gear, this could be your secret portal to the silver-screen. All you gotta do is buy the ticket, take the ride. Just one question…will there be chocolate mikados? (See here for details of free talks hosted by Le Cool) / Conor McTernan

 

January 23 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10pm

how much
€8/€6

dj set
Real Connoisseur

A newcomer to the house scene, 20 year-old DJ and electronic music producer Real Connoisseur brings sub-bass driven jungle-y vibes to the homely surroundings of the Twisted Pepper basement tonight. His tracks are characterised by infectious house beats, shimmering synths and expertly timed build-ups. Listen out for last year's stunning release, Nobody's Fool - a slickly produced tangle of chopped up, multi-layered vocal samples that form the track's incredibly catchy central melody. This is interrupted by punchy bassline that emerges unexpectedly from the oceanic haze of euphoric synth chords. More recent productions such as Jungle Jakarta see this precocious producer experimenting with unusual genre combinations - the track jumps between the sparse, ambient deep house and frenetic, frantic jungle beats to great effect. / Oísín Leonard

 

January 23 2014


where
Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College, Dublin 2
01 896 1334
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€15/€12

theatre
The Brothers Karamazov

When still applying liberal amounts of spot cream as a youth, I chose the route of trying to read impressive sounding books to impress girls. As a result, I spent long hours awkwardly standing in the classics section of the library, and Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky were the first attempts. Leo was quickly resigned to gathering dust, but I began devouring the other Russian master. Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, Notes from Underground and, finally, The Brothers Karamazov. How director Nicholas Johnson has distilled this masterwork into a stage play will be fascinating - bringing out the themes of philosophy, religion and death that imbue every page is the real challenge. Lesson? When trying to impress girls through books, it’s best not to do it alone in your room. The books I read may have been clever, but I certainly wasn’t. / Hugh Torpey

   
 

January 24 2014


where
The Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€14.50

gig
Son Lux

There’s probably not a massive overlap between recipients of Pitchfork’s ‘Best New Track’ honour and composers whose work has been performed at Carnegie Hall, but Denver native Ryan Lott can proudly claim to have ‘done the double’. The 24-year-old musical maverick has composed ballet scores, helped soundtrack Hollywood films and even cooked up a couple of hip-hop EPs with noted grammar enthusiast Sufjan Stevens. For now though, the focus is on his Son Lux alter-ego. Equally guided by his classical influences and electronic inclinations, current album Lanterns finds him distilling a bewildering array of inputs and coming up trumps. Ever fancied hearing For He’s A Jolly Good Fellow played on the theremin? Well, Lott’s Dublin debut just so happens to coincide with his 25th birthday so, with any luck, that day might be upon us. Win Tickets / Joey Kavanagh

 

January 24 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
3.45pm, 7pm, 9.15pm & 11.30pm

how much
€7.50/€9

cinema
Inside Llewyn Davis

Set against the milieu of the folk music scene of the 1960s, Inside Llewyn Davis is a thoughtful and darkly funny examination of luck, misfortune and what it means to be an artist. The latest in a long lineage of hapless antiheroes crafted by the Coen Brothers, Llewyn Davis is a struggling, couch-surfing musician still reeling from the death of the Garfunkel to his Simon, but nevertheless attempting to gain a foothold in the notoriously fickle music industry. A self-saboteur of the highest order, the film follows Davis as he makes a series of ill-conceived decisions that ensure success eludes him. It's an ambling, low-key affair punctuated and enhanced by some gorgeous musical performances that evoke not only the time and place, but the strain of melancholy running throughout. An understated, bewildering gem. / Amy O'Connor

 

January 24 2014


where
Dicey's Garden, 21-25 Harcourt Street, Dublin 2


when
7:30pm

how much
€5

fundraiser
Quiz for the Harbour Playhouse

We can reel off the names of Dublin's most oft-visited places in a heartbeat, but how would it feel to add a young gun to the rote learned roll-call? The Harbour Playhouse. Sounds good, eh? Based in the chi-chi red brick environs of Portobello, this young venue hopes to facilitate fizzy, poppy theatre. So, an excellent cause to fundraise for, in which case you'll need the following: Jackson Pollock's birthday was the 28th January, William Hartnell was the first Doctor Who, Marisa Tomei won the Oscar for best supporting actress in 1992, and Eleanor Catton was the youngest Man Booker prize winner, with the longest ever winning book in 2013. Grayson Perry won the Turner Prize in 1993, Quentin Tarantino's debut feature was Reservoir Dogs and Kate Moss is 40. You're welcome. Make money fo' funny. / Cora Burke

 

January 24 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€25.99

gig
Bellowhead

Bringing bar brawl back, yeah! You other folk acts don't know how to act...you'd better pack up your fiddles and head to the Button Factory to witness this century-muddled trad spectacular. Since I first witnessed them parading in tophats and tails like debauched Dorian Grays and stamping along, whooping "I'll drink it hot, I'll drink it cold, I'll drink it new, I'll drink it old" in that infamous ode to whiskey, Whiskey is the Life of Man, it's been love. Yeah, they do look a bit like the cast of Teachers, but that makes the bizarrely hedonistic vibe (Byronic, not Bez) all the more seductive. Hookers and sinkers, jollies and drinkers, Bellowhead perform a set that inspires dancing riots. Beware the dancing plague... / Kate Coleman

   
 

January 25 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
11pm

how much
€15

dj set
Erol Alkan & Daniel Avery

Erol Alkan was, in at least a small way, responsible for the return of dance music in clubs. Skinny jeaned, mullet-haired promoters were hustled out of the way by Alkan and his crew, helping to relaunch and refresh the dance/indie genre. Nothing as spectacular had been seen in club culture since the 1980s. Indie and electro-kid style collided, producing a colony of Noel Fielding alikes at his clubnight Trash at The End. The Sunday Times was so alarmed they began to camp outside nu-rave/pop establishments and gawk at the glittered and glammed up patrons. You won't be able to resist getting into the groove as Alkan hits the decks, so have those white canvas pumps sprayed in day-glo, ready to shake it like it's 2007 and the Klaxons aren't embarrassing. Get hot, get Trash-y, get techno. / Kate Coleman

 

January 25 2014


where
The Abbey Theatre, 26 Lower Abbey Street, D1
Location Map

when
8pm (previews 25th/27th)

how much
€18/€13

dance
ACTIONS - An Evening of Men in Motion

Modern dance is one of those things you don't want to admit to enjoying. It's the dance equivalent of enjoying free-form jazz. But the startling reality is that modern dance is capable of rendering an atmosphere emotionally fraught and creating a silent story with a wordless narrative of athleticism. Irish Modern Dance Theatre presents an evening programme of dance, with Actions, performed by Ashley Chen and Philip Connaughton, and also the Irish premier of Totem Ancestor, chorerographed by Merce Cunningham. The Big Message and The Bowing Dance will complete this night of incredible dance. The young bucks of the art form will have you spreading the good news of behalf of modern dance, even if it's more chi-chi to pretend you went to the ballet. / Cora Burke

 

January 25 2014


where
Meeting House Square, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.


when
10pm

how much
Free

dance
Super Céilí

The auld céilí has a bad rep, as it often conjures up the horrors of jigs and reels forced upon us in Irish college. If that’s what pops into your head at the thought, then you, my friend, have never been to a Super Céilí. From the unique imagination of multi-instrumentalist Peter Staunton, Super Céilí mixes live traditional musicians and a dance DJ with a battery of special effects for a unique twist on the genre that will blow away any lingering memories of awkward adolescent sets with clammy-handed partners. As part of TradFest, the madness is descending on Meeting House Square this Saturday. Under the retractable umbrellas of this versatile public space, prepare to experience the world’s first traditional music nightclub. Don’t forget your dancing shoes, you’re going to need them. / Kate McEvoy

   
 

January 26 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
15:30

how much
€7.50/€6

screening
Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?

I lived with the soundtrack of Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? for a good half-decade before I actually got to experience the madcap movie. A folkish, comic masterpiece, the Coen brothers take farce to its logical conclusion - the Ku Klux Klan are reduced to the clucking chickens they onomatopoeically echo in a burning haze, blind men cause havoc, guilty men maintain their innocence and all this is framed with the musical traditions of the Deep South. Homer's Odyssey with a kick ass soundtrackOh Brother is the class clown to Inside Llewyn Davis' hapless wannabe starving garret-based artist, and reassuring proof that the Coens' humour hasn't dampened with the years. / Cora Burke

 

January 26 2014


where
Lilliput Press, 63 Sitric Road, Dublin 7


when
7:30pm

how much
€10/€8

gig
Listen at Lilliput

With Monday morning mooching around the corner, Sunday nights can be a bit of a drag but the perfect tonic to ease one into the working week can be found at Lilliput HQ where their super fine taste in literature extends to a finely tuned ear for musical talent. This cleverly curated line­up harmoniously fuses the eclectic musical nous on show. The honeyed vocals of singer songwriter Sallay pour through soul sounds infused with folk, her classical training cradling the melodic tumble and pull. Utilising a medley of genres, Sean Mac Erlaine deftly balances the experimental with the instrumental and all lady ensemble Everything Shook command a pulsing electro performance. In an intimate novel-clad enclave this second birthday bash for Listen at Lilliput is the ideal way to make the weekend last that little bit longer. / Sophie Donaldson

   
 

January 27 2014


where
Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA), 15 Ely Place, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until February 23rd

how much
Free

exhibition
Vera Klute - Deadweight

An unwitting flock of birds crash-flies into an obstruction whose presence is impossible to detect because it isn’t there. Pop art-y, graphic novel-y ‘Crack!!!’ and ‘Whack!!!’ explosion bubbles of hard yellow perspex both punch-up the non-drama of the collision and reveal the extreme artificiality of the thing. These aren’t actual birds but rather feathered taxidermies once aloft outdoors now suspended indoors and above the floor by fishing lines. Artist Vera Klute seems intent on drawing the real into the non-real. On one corner of the gallery space stand skeletons conjoined in a sacral knot and painted pink; on another, Bourjois-bronzed dentition brought to chattering life by motion sensors. Hung on walls are pencil cross-hatched studies of what looks like leaves or discarded snakeskin fringed by tea stains of lilac. / Olen Bajarias

 

January 27 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
18:30

how much
€10

screening
The Night Porter

Sadomasochism, stripteases and the holocaust. Suffice to say The Night Porter is one you should definitely take your mum to and why not treat the kids while you’re at it? Showing as part of the IFI’s Sex, Drugs and Rock’n’Roll season the film has deeply divided viewers since its release in 1974. Roger Ebert despised it and the New York Times referred to it as a piece of claptrap. However, Lilliana Cavani’s stylish visuals and great performances from Dirk Bogarde and Charlotte Rampling take this beyond exploitative chic. What it lacks when compared to classic contemporaries Belle de Jour (sadomasochism) or Il Conformista (fascist decay) it makes up for in cultural influence. A display of eroticism that has captivated to the point where it has transcended generations, imaginations and justifying Madonna’s love. / David Cadwallader

   
 

January 28 2014


where
5 Dame Lane, Dublin 2.

when
8am - 7pm

how much
Depends

pop-up
Ness The Juicery

We all wore black armbands and moped like mini-Morrisseys when Makers and Brothers packed their trunks and said goodbye to the circus on Dame Lane. That is, until a new venture swooped down bearing fruit and veg concoctions. If you're craving kale and cucumber, Ness are there to pump all the vitamins out of their fruit vessels and into cutesy bottles for your enjoyment, making sure you'll two of your five a day while you're scuttling from A to B. It's a pop-up, so roll up, roll up, it'll be here for a limited time only. The space is also welcoming, beetroot bruisers downing their elixirs at the bar, and watching the world go by. If your body is your temple, Ness is your Mecca. / Cora Burke

 

January 28 2014


where
The Gutter Bookshop, Cow's Lane Temple Bar
Location Map

when
6.30pm - 8pm

how much
Free

book launch
Willy Vlautin

It's somewhat surprising how few lyricists turn their hand to being wordsmiths. Nick and Patti have done the bookshelf deed with aplomb. Bob and Leonard are old dab hands too but you'd be hard pressed to name many more. One worth dropping though is Richmond Fontaine frontman Willy Vlautin who has flexed considerably literary muscle over the years. From his debut The Motel Life which recently earned a film release to Free, his fourth and current novel, Willy observers the chinks of humanity midst the fractures of modern Americana. In Free, three lives intersect against social-political backdrops such as war and healthcare. Willy will be on hand to read, sign and have the chats with our own Roddy Doyle. / Zach Joyce

   
 

January 29 2014


where
Saint Werburgh's Church, Werburgh Street, The Liberties, Dublin 2. 01 478 3710‎
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€16

gig
Young Hearts Run Free presents Moonface

Spencer Krug, who operates under the dimly lit moniker Moonface, joins the literary-musos at Young Hearts Run Free next Wednesday to perform his first ever full-length gig in Ireland. His musical melancholia is steeped in undulating melodies, epitomised by his serenade, Julia with Blue Jeans on. Then, there's his twenty minute opus, Marimba and Shit Drums, an afro-pop piece with a magical, 1970s kids' show vibe. He produces sadness-tinged pop songs that don't have that James Blake gumly-chewing-on-his-shoelaces precociousness. Then, he drifts into indie band frontman mode with electro-drum songs like I'm not the Phoenix yet. Moonface is a play-dough leader amongst musical men. / Kate Coleman

 

January 29 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
Free but RSVP before 21st Jan

talk
Banter: Living For The City

In December, I sat transfixed in my car, listening to Fr. Peter McVerry’s voice on the airwaves calmly but pointedly illuminate the realities of being homeless and the high toll austerity has taken on the nation, especially those on the fringes of society. With decades spent working to better the lot of Ireland’s homeless, he is the latest personality to grace the always engaging brainchild of Jim Carroll, Banter. For those who have missed out on the hundreds of previous incarnations, Banter is a series of public talks or as Jim says himself, a collection of “discussions, talks, rows and conversations” about a myriad of subjects with various panellists on hand to with their own unique expertise. FrMcVerry certainly has a point of view worth hearing, as well as endless compassion for the struggles of others. / Kate McEvoy

   
 
Ciaran Cassidy, the Sundance Kid

Le Cool talked film noir style disappearances with Ciaran Cassidy, whose short doc, The Last Days of Peter Bergmann, screened at Sundance this week.

It's funny - some stories in Ireland are recycled 24/7 and then there's other stuff hat people don't touch whatsoever. 

I read about this case of a suicide of an unknown man when it came up in the Coroner's Court and I knew the story would be fairly raw, as stories like that would be afterwards. So I cut it out and it went in my "Ideas Drawer". I left it for a year and then I contacted the guard who was involved...He said that it was one of the most haunting cases he had ever come across. I knew then that it wasn't just me. 

It was surprising that everyone agreed to do it and that everybody seemed touched by his story. A lot of people in Sligo had a lot of sympathy for what he must have been going through.

For more on The Last Days of Peter Bergmann check out the extended feature on The Prowlster. It will screen along with Future Shorts in the Freemasons Hall next Thursday followed by a Q&A. PHOTO: seanandyvette