Dublin *218 - The Food Issue

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Dublin's hunger games have an ever-changing line up of combatants that dish it out in an attempt to whet our appetites. As grub replaces pub in the mind of the Dub, it's clear the city is no longer starved for choice. On the contrary, the array of options at our disposal can sometimes be debilitating. Be thankful then and say grace before reading this, our first Food Issue of 2014.

And though this food special is a snapshot of the Dublin food scene right now, we've still found time to pay respects to some of the food institutions here, like the chipper stand in the George's Street Arcade that's held court for 34 years or the little donut kiosk on O'Connell Street that has kept Dubliners sugar-sated since 1988.

The city has changed since we last stuck a fork in it and we are very excited at the the proposed regeneration of the Smithfield food market, but we are still waiting for our fleet of food trucks.

For our roll call of all the places we've covered in previous food issues - we call it The Archive but it could just as easily be labeled The 75 Le Coolest Food Places in Dublin - just click HERE.

Who is currying flavour this week? Ciaran, Kate, Michael, Amy, Maxime or Connor?
"I was convinced my legs were chicken drumsticks." - Aoife Dooley
... Read More
   
 


where
Super Miss Sue, Unit 2-3, Drury St. Car Park
Location Map

when
Take Away: 12 - 12/3, Cafe: 12 - 10/11

how much
see menu


Super Miss Sue

The people of the 'Island of Ireland' don't really deserve good fish. We have no respect for it, neither do we know how to prepare it. Unfortunately, many of our fishermen are forced to spend as much of their time fishing as moaning about EU directives to boil-in-the-bag-faced regional correspondents, before exporting most of our prime catch to more fish-friendly places. Resident ex-pats from such places are already enjoying an increasingly impressive array of fish and shellfish at Super Miss Sue, a new spot from the folks behind 777, Dillinger's and The Butcher Grill. Spankingly fresh specimens are simply and expertly prepared. Oysters on the half shell are ambrosial. The opening of the restaurant proper is imminent. In the meantime, Irish patrons should content themselves with the best fish and chips in the City. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 


where
147 Deli, 147 Parnell St., Dublin 1
Location Map

when
M-F: 9-4, S: 9-5, S: 10-4

how much
depends


147 Deli

I’ve come to agree with Apple Maps that there is in fact a Chinatown in Dublin and that Parnell Street is its epicentre. Past veterans Kimchi and Pho Viet stands the street’s latest cheap-eaterie, the grey façade and wood panelling is surprisingly inconspicuous between a defunct newsagent and a budget hostel. With staff friendly enough to arrive to your table with your tray in tow AND to offer you WiFi while you’re frantically trying to Shazam what Roots song is playing over lunchtime service, 147 is a welcome retort to anyone that still holds preconceptions about the lack of stalwart eateries north of the Liffey. Minted cous cous, feta and tzatziki spice up the tantalisingly tender Moroccan lamb wrap special and for €7.50 with a side you’ll have enough for your next bus fare back. / Connor Clarke

 


where
Luncheonette, NCAD, 100 Thomas St., Dublin 8
Location Map

when
M-F: 8:30-15:45

how much
depends


Luncheonette

When the opportunity to take over the basement canteen in NCAD came up, artist Jennie Moran was up for reactivating it. What could easily be a gloomy concrete bunker has now been converted into a cosy dining area beautifully lit by one of Moran’s installations. It turned out to be a bit a coup for the college as she is now working with Brazilian chef, Wagner Dos Santos, on one of the city’s most mouth-watering lunch menus. From soups (roast garlic and white bean soup with cheesy tarragon toast anyone?) to sandwiches (the-making-me-drool-as-I-type slow-roasted pulled pork brioche with apple sauce), Luncheonette’s heavenly fare is also Dublin’s most reasonably-priced. Don’t even get me started on their Pastel de Nata... / Simon Judge

 


where
22 Great Strand Street
Dublin 1


when
Until 9pm most evenings

how much
Dishes around €5.50 mark


Han Yang

Despite being known as the Italian Quarter (or 'Wallace Town' in honour of the pink-shirted TD who developed it), the best cuisine to be in that little square of Dublin which hugs Ormond Quay is actually Korean. It's also hidden. Not tucked away in a quaint 'peek-a-boo' kinda way, but disguised, camouflaged, neither advertised nor announced. It's as if the folk behind Han Yang would rather you didn't know about it and to be honest, I'm annoyed at myself for sharing this secret with you too. At the back of this Asian store is a deli where cheap, heaped high plate delights await those who manage to find it. Order the fantastic bibimbap or pork kimchi and muscle for space among the Korean throngs who congregate there. You'll walk out, belly-full and pockets heavy with change from a tenner. Some of the best scran in the city. / Vernon Steel

   
 

February 27 2014


where
Outhouse Theatre, 105 Capel St. D8
Location Map

when
7:30 PM

how much
free

spoken word
Come Rhyme With Me - Censored Edition

A man, a queen, from Ballinrobe, who dared to utter “homophobe”, opened up a can of worms that made the Montrose bigwigs squirm. Under the threat of legal action, they bowed to demands of a right-wing faction, but when the clip was made disappear, the Streisand Effect wound into gear. Amid the drama and clamorous noise, Panti bravely held her poise. On the Abbey stage, she bared her soul; told how “checking yourself” takes its toll. After tit for tat between pro and anti, the Noble Call made it game Team Panti. But set and match remain TBC, so let’s pass the mic to Come Rhyme With Me. A night of spoken word and rhymes, to honour an icon of our times, reflect on decades of hard-won fights and share our dreams of equal rights. / Joey Kavanagh

 


where
Tamp & Stitch, Scarlet Row, Temple Bar


when
6:00 PM

how much
€12

food
SLIDERSandSOURS

Gruel Guerilla has been revolutionising our munch culture with one night wonders that have come to be defined by their experimental food pairings and focus on local produce. Their cultish and coltish following have tasted dehydrated pastas in The Hugh Lane Gallery, Crusties & Rusties in Tamp & Stitch, as well as bumbling Belfast bound with Pancakes & Milkshakes at Established Coffee. It all began with the lo-fi supper club, News of the Curd, and since then, Kevin Powell has brought intriguing ingredient pairings to the people. So...roll up, roll up for SLIDERSandSOURS, kimchi and pork sliders washed down with Teelings Whiskey and Eight Degrees Amber Ella Sours. Put away your Haribo, cos this shit just got real. / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

 

February 27 2014


where
South Studios, 27 New Row South, Dublin 8
Location Map

when
7:30 PM

how much
€7/€10

performance
Spring Awakenings

The sight of blue skies after months of purple hands, chapped lips and visible breath is a pleasure in life that is simple, yet entirely beautiful and welcome. The innocence of flower sniffing, sea paddling and is imminent (along with canal can-ing). Benjamin Britten's Simple Symphony is an appropriate soundtrack to this most immaculate of seasonal changes as it shines with playful excitement and youthful vigor, using themes the composer wrote somewhere between the ages of 9 and 13. Téada Orchestra, conducted by Matthew Rafter, perform Simple Symphony as well as Hindemith's Trauermusik, Rimsky-Korsakov's Russian Easter Overture and a premiere of Elliot Murphy's Ar na Coillte san Fhomhair in Éirinn at Spring Awakenings, the ensemble's second performance. Open the door into the glory of spring. / Warren McCarthy

 

February 27 2014


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8:00 PM

how much
€11

gig
Tvvins

With gigs in The Cast of Cheers, Adebisi Shank and No Spill Blood you'd wonder where Conor Adams and Lar Kaye get the time to add to the synth-pop game. Blending Cast of Cheers-style percussion gives a sense of tropical urgency with vocoder treated vocals bringing you on a voyage to an altogether warmer, and faraway planet. Tracks like You Better and Two Worlds prove they aren't just another synth group with a v or two in their name. This is the sound of spilled beers on a packed dance floor , sweat-laden clothes, and attempting to satisfy an insatiable urge to dance. What a treat in dreary February. Win Tickets / Connor Clarke

 

February 27 2014


where
Age Action, Camden Street, Dublin 2. 

when
5pm

how much
Depends

fundraiser
Age Action Vintage Sale

Age Action is the preferred charity shop destination of future Advanced Style stars where 'Glamour' and 'Nana' conjoin to create the Glamanana. The Camden Street store often boasts Saturday queues of treasure hunters looking to get their grubby hands on some curio and vintage threads, so this event, where they will be selling premium and designer vintage, will most definitely prove to attract a clientele that knows their Chesterton from their Chesterfield. We got a sneak peek on what will be on offer, including a 1930s wedding dress that Keira Knightley could have worn in the less unhappy ending of Atonement, and some Royal Doulton, so you can have a china collection to rival your granny's. / Kate Coleman

 

February 27 2014


where
Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College, Dublin 2
01 896 1334
Location Map

when
8:00 PM

how much
€14/€18

performance
Interloper

It is somewhat ironic that the notion of belonging is explored through dance in this production. How many awkward, self-conscious dancers have you seen on a night out while others flawlessly shimmy around them? The act of questioning your place, why that happens and who decides what it means to fit in are all expressed by the cast in Interloper, including choreographer Liz Roche. An interloper is someone who doesn’t belong in a certain situation but this eclectic bunch of dancers came together to explore if this definition even has any meaning. Win Tickets / Aisling Kett

 

February 27 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€7/€10 (with album)

gig
The Hardcore Priests of Yemen

The Hardcore Priests of Yemen sounds like the follow up Guinness ad to the Society of Elegant Persons of the Congo. And in some ways, they are. This seven piece funk/ska/trad outfit based in Galway occupy a proud niche and enjoy a flamboyant sound. Rather than pocket watches, monocles and ornate walking sticks they've chosen a musical mix of xylophone, cello, clarinet and flute, among other things. Winners of the Townhouse Battle of the Bands in December 2013, talents no doubt honed after a summer of festival hopping, they spent the 10k cash prize on their first full studio album, The Cardboard Circus. This is the sound of Galway in full flowy, fusion form. / Vernon Steel

   
 


where
Bird Cage Bakery, 21 Harcourt Rd, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
Opens till 6pm most days

how much
€9.50 for sandwich, a coffee and a chocolate.


The Birdcage Bakery

Cajun spiced chicken wrap with mayo, carrot and lettuce. Prawn wrap with Marie Rose sauce. Salami bagel with blue cheese. Roast beef bagel with emmenthal, red cabbage, mustard and mayo. Piadina filled with cream cheese. Aubergine, courgette and roast pepper tortilla. Yougurt scones. White chocolates with beetroot. Awesome soups. Proper coffee. Yellow decor. Italian staff. Get in my belly, pronto. The only downside here is the lack of space inside for sitting down to fully digest what's on offer. Thankfully, on my visit, a foreign couple were so grub happy with their order they shared the chessboard-sized table with me. Not much room in the Birdcage but the food is enough to bring you out in song, if not a few tweets. / Vernon Steel

 

February 27 2014


where
The Library Project, 4 Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Book launch tonight, exhibition runs until March 9th

how much
free

launch
The Life of Psy

Denis Carre lived in Ireland for 12 years before a case of mistaken identity changed his life forever. The story goes like this: Korean born, French raised Carre arrived at a MANGO fashion show during Barcelona Fashion week and was instantly mistaken for billion hits Youtube sensation and K-pop singer, Psy. The perils of being Asian and wearing a suit jacket at a fashion festival. Almost instantaneously, people started losing their shit - models and media went crazy and the free drinks flowed - it probably didn't help that Carre could nail the Gangnam Style dance. Carre is now a full time impersonator and photographer Maciej Pestka was there to document the transformation. His new photobook, The Life Of Psy, launches today. / Vernon Steel

 


where
Fritehaus, 87 Camden St. Lower, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
T, W, T: 12 PM - 8/9/10 PM, F/S: 12 PM - 12 AM, S: 10-8 PM

how much
see menu


Fritehaus

The Sausage. That universal carnivorous pleasure point. Fully self-contained without, gastronomically multifaceted within and subject to endless permutations, all encased in that crispy tensile skin. New Camden strip joint Frite Haus does for the sausage (via medium of hotdoggery), what ye olde gourmet burger joints have been flogging to death with meat patties in a bun the year before. The buns have personalities of their own, the crispy onions addictive and the beer is uber crafty. What nailed it for me was the sophisticated sauce-ry and condiment selection on offer alongside their united nations array of sausage meat, including chorizo and falafel (regardless of the Germanic moniker). Any chalkboard boasting Truffle 'n Parmesan, Chipotle and Ponzu Emulsion has got to be taken a little more seriously than the kebab joint next door. / Elish Bul-Godley

   
 


where
O'Connell St
Dublin 1

when
8am - 10pm

how much
Cheap


Little Donut Kiosk

For something that's measured in square inches, the Rolling Donut is still a prime piece of profitable real estate. This happy house of ringed confectionery is a one-person donut dispensary, operating since 1988, keeping Dubliners sugar-sated with its particular brand of oily, warm, battered beauts. Pick your pleasure; plain (smothered in sugar granules) or chocolate and hand over the few cents they cost. Spare a thought for the lonely soul who works in there, breathing in that saccharine scent that wafts through the space that you couldn't swing a mosquito in. This family-run business is as Dublin as Ronnie Drew, bananas sold from prams and white lady statuettes. It's a little shop of sugar that will outlive us all. / Vernon Steel

 

February 28 2014


where
Gate Theatre, Cavendish Row, Parnell Square, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
7.30pm (until March 22)

how much
€25-€35

theatre
The Vortex

Debuting in 1924 (4 years before the Gate opened), The Vortex was the product of the 25 year-old mind of Noel Coward. Indeed the programme notes state he became a “sensation” after writing and starring in it. The self-absorbed high society cocoon he writes of is spot on with its delicious wit swirling around a nymphomaniac, a cad, a queer, some cocaine addiction and a girl called Bunty. This production teases out the turmoil midst themes of vanity and hedonism. Florence Lancaster (Susannah Harker), is an aging beauty who seeks solace and sexual satiation from younger gents. Her wayward son Nicky (Rory Fleck Byrne) dances a mean Charleston but also a merry dance. The mirrors on stage catch the glamour but equally allow us glimpse the ugly and tortured sides of the protagonists from many angles. File under 'theatre darling'. / Zach Joyce

 

February 28 2014


where
Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Chancery Lane, Dublin 8
Location Map

when
Until 22nd March

how much
free


Of Clouds and Strings

The structures that make up Ulrich Vogl’s exhibition at once resemble rotating planets, fixed by cruel cosmic mechanics to twirl forever, and display models of ceiling lanterns in a home furniture store. One of these structures is a scaled-up hamster wheel with a length of string dyed in rainbow colours tied across it. As the wheel spins, carousel-like, its moving metal rungs visually break up the string into a scatter of movement – bars of dashes that look like spat projectiles in Space Impact (see also: other wildly oblique references to obscure LCD display-based Nokia mobile phone games). In another piece, Wolkenfilmmaschine, wrinkles of silver foil are nudged to drift like clouds. Vogl uses the simplicity of optical illusion to animate the inanimate, engineering startlingly mesmerising twitches of life. / Olen Bajarias

 


where
Canal Bank Café, 146 Leeson St. Upper, Dublin 4
Location Map

when
M-F: 9-11, S/S: 11-11

how much
see menu


The Canal Bank Café

Long before the burrito became the food of choice for Dublin's masses, there was the chicken wing. Marinated, fried and accompanied with various blue cheese dips, these glorified hen's elbows whet the appetite of everyone with teeth. Restaurants were awash with frenzied nibbling as greasy-fingered gorgers vied to sample the best specimens on offer. Some establishments excelled and have become beacons for aficionados, one such being The Canal Bank Cafe. As well as hearty brunches and succulent steak dinners, the pinnacle of its menu are the famed wings. While the name misleads you to think you may actually be overlooking a canal rather than the traffic prelude to the N11 it's probably for the best as the ducks can't throw you filthies as you feast upon their feathered friends. / Sarah Maguire

 


where
Tap House, 60 Ranelagh, Dublin 6
Location Map

when
M-T: 12-11:30 PM, F: 12 PM - 12:30 AM, S: 12 PM-2:30 AM, S: 12-11 PM

how much
see menu


Tap House

An addition to the bustling Ranelagh social scene has sprung up on the site of former stalwart Russell's. Tap House Bar and Kitchen offers a quality range of house cocktails, craft beer and food, including their delicious collection of sliders. There's an admirable emphasis on Irish microbrews as well as the still somewhat unique to Dublin option of purchasing growlers to take away before 10pm. No sniggering at the back! A growler is a reusable container that allows you to take your favorite draft beer home. Like most spots in the busy village, you'll be doing well to snag a table of a weekend evening but there's plenty of space along the bars. It's also a great spot to follow the remainder of Ireland's 6 Nations campaign or, in keeping the the US influence, checking out some NFL in season. Craft beer, tasty bites and sport for the win. / Kate McEvoy

 

February 28 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10:30 PM

how much
€10/€15

dj set
Kyle Hall Vs. Funkinevin

Detroit. Like Paris for love or Waterford for Blaas, some places are just plain synonymous with things. Detroit and techno are forever intertwined and with the stamp of Motor City on your back a producer is more likely to be seen as legit than if you come from, well, Waterford. So when you are commonly proclaimed as the next great wunderkind from the home of the relentless 4/4 kick drum, people sit up and take notice. Kyle Hall is this person. What really sets him apart however is the fact that he has risen to this mantle, grabbed hold of it, and taken the music somewhere left of center. In this manner, that he should run into London’s Funkeneven was somehow written in the stars, and the pair have undertaken a journey into the off kilter, the distorted, but the still plainly brilliant. / Emmet Condon

   
 


where
Kinara Kitchen, 17 Ranelagh Rd., Dublin 6
Location Map

when
12 - 11 PM

how much
see menu


Kinara Kitchen

Curries in our fair city are ten a penny and of varying degrees of quality, so finding a good one is worth shouting about. With sister restaurants in Malahide and Clontarf, Kinara Kitchen in Ranelagh is one such gem. Specializing in Pakistani cuisine, their dishes are beautifully presented with rich flavors and quality ingredients. The varied menu has something for everyone from spice junkies and seafood aficionados to those watching the calories with the lighter fare options. Kinara Kitchen further sets itself apart with its partnership with noted Irish mixologist Paul Lambert. Together with an extensive wine list, you can enjoy his collection of old classics and recipes inspired by the kitchen along with your meal. Alternatively, head upstairs to their special speak-easy style space for an very special aperitif... / Kate McEvoy

 


where
Etto, 18 Merrion Row, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
Tues-Sat: 12-3 PM, 5:30-10 PM

how much
see menu


Etto

Merrion Row courts thoughts of mandarins and hacks within the shadow of government buildings. And once upon a time The Unicorn was the food front for hand shakes and back slaps. It now lies defunct, changed from haunt to haunted. A sign of times and tastes. A few doors down Etto is making its own more modest power play. Space is tight but worth a shoulder rub when the food is on such a pedestal. Yes the small plates are small but combinations such as poached egg, smoked eel and bacon broth (€11) mean there's no desire to really fork flirt with your partner. Most of the twist is Italian and there's the roulette of a bar perch. The bill tots up especially if you're capable of downing a bottle of wine and finding an extra glass too half-way house. I was in good company of course and sure wasn't Eamon Dunphy at the next table. / Zach Joyce

 

February 28 2014


where
The Joinery, 6 Rosemount Terrace, Arbour Hill
Location Map

when
8:00 PM

how much
€8/€10

gig
Twinkranes/Crowhammer

Man or metronome? The drummer of Twinkranes is a force of nature. Taut, rigid, hammering out motorik rhythms at breakneck pace - it’s a mesmerizing sight. Meanwhile psychedelic keys spiral outwards, balanced by droning, 60s-style vocal intonations, everything stitched together by that relentless, elemental drum beat. But no matter how far outwards (or inwards) Twinkranes explore, they never lose touch with melody - a vital lifeline that stops them floating off into boring nothingness. They’ve expanded from a duo to a three-piece, and new material might be on the cards, so this is one for the old heads as well as any new fans. A slab of cans in a small, scarcely-furnished concrete room, dudes playing their guts out not four feet from your face - no better conditions for a claustrophobic Friday night zone out. / Marcus O'Sullivan

 


where
Forest Avenue, 8 Sussex Terrace, Dublin 4
Location Map

when
Lunch T-F: 12-3, Dinner W-S: 6-9:30, Brunch S: 12-3

how much
see menu


Forest Avenue

Brazilian single origin coffee. Churros dipped in a cup of melted chocolate. Yoghurt with blood orange, spiced bread and housemade granola. Crispy duck hash with gribiche, leeks and kale. Brilliantly poached egg atop smokey haddock and house made cavatelli pasta. Rhubarb and custard for dessert. All for €24. Forest Avenue, just off the Mespil Road along the Grand Canal, have created the brunch I've always dreamed of. Opened in late 2013, culinary couple John and Sandy Wyer and their brilliant team are serving friendly neighbourbood fine-dining. Whether you're in for the six+ tasting course dinner menu (€48 per person and worth every cent), their fancy lunch mid-week through to Saturday or the five course tasting brunch on a Sunday, you are going to leave loving it. / Aoife McElwain

 

March 01 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10:30 PM

how much
€13/€15

dj set
Regis & Virginia

British-born industrial techno has extended it’s grip to wider audiences in recent years, notably with regards to new labels like Blackest Ever Black and cross-over acts like Karenn and Truss for inspiring a generation of kids to beef up their kick drums and embrace the dark arts. However this is nothing of a revolution. High-calibre repetitive music has always lurked in the shadows, occupying its own place and been quite accessible if you just cared to search in the right warehouses or basements. Regis has been bludgeoning the underground for over two decades with a post-punk aesthetic and a DIY, hammer and tongs approach to building intense unadulterated, face-melting energy. Virginia fuses analog tracks with modern sounds and adds a third dimension with spontaneous golden vocals. / Conor McTernan

   
 


where
Wolf and Spoon, 10a Aungier St., Dublin 2
Location Map

when
M-F: 7-6, S: 9-4

how much
depends


Wolf and Spoon

If you're looking for a compromise between the Let Me Know plastic fantastic of Fusco's and the 'OH MY GOD EVERYONE I KNOW IS HERE AND I HAVE THE FEAR' of the Whitefriar Grill, Wolf + Spoon, sitting snug on Aungier Street, is your manna from heaven. Serving hearty fare with provenance (read: Irish sourced), Wolf + Spoon is a self-aware but not self-conscious spot, with a trendy caff vibe, which is rarely found in Dublin since the Celtic Tiger Centra-vised breakfast. Think working man's cafe gone to a gallery, with homely toasties, specials that look like your ma is hiding in the kitchen, and cockle-warming soups. Definitely one for collective hangover-curing on a Saturday or Sunday morning, or for when you want to imagine what Jarvis Cocker's life is like. / Kate Coleman

 


where
Kerrigan's, 7 Main St., Malahide
Location Map

when
M-S: 8-7, S/BH: 9-6

how much
depends


Kerrigan's Butchers

OK, so we may have got 'ideas' about ourselves during the Celtic Tiger years in Malahide. Sure, the packed-out-20quid-a-head-tenner-a-drink nights out in Joemangos of a Wednesday were great craic and we're grateful for Starbucks in a self-loathing kinda way... but Malahide lost a lot of it's unique village character over the years. So it's great to see the return of independent and unique businesses such as Kerrigan's Butchers. Located right at the front of SuperValu (haha), it's a family owned siopa with years of experience. Run by brothers, the focus is on local sourcing of quality meats, at a reasonable price. The great thing about independent butchers is that they let you be brave. Whether trying goat, ox tail or your first roast they're happy to help you figure out just how much you need for a meal and will prepare it accordingly. / Rachel Ray

 

March 02 2014


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
11:00 PM

how much
€5

screening
Oscars Night

Julia Roberts winning for Best Actress, Forrest Gump winning Best Picture, Titanic winning eleven of the things; the history of the Oscars is filled with enough folly as to render them insignificant. Yet in the last few years there’s been sea change in how the ceremony is watched; the teary speeches, the self-aggrandisement and the complete lack of self-awareness have created a night of campish entertainment - like Eurovision with less songs and more gongs. Those good folks over at The Sugar Club are throwing a night of champagne cocktails, fancy dress (optional) and responsible (optional) gambling. If that were not enough, it’s also in the good cause of helping one Sara Walsh Delaney get the help she needs. / David Cadwallader

 


where
Pizza e Porchetta, Clanwilliam Terrace, Grand Canal Quay, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
M-F: 12-10, S:1-11, S: 1-9

how much
see menu


Pizza e Porchetta

Sunday social media is saturated with Instagram images of open pizza boxes as Dubliners binge on disappointing, stodgy dough scattered with charred toppings to fill the hangover hole. It doesn't have to be this way. It's time to rediscover pizza the way nature intended - a light floury base fired in a wood oven at 650 °C topped with a mound of fresh, zesty ingredients packed with strong flavours and a Brooklyn attitude. Try the Apis (€14) with tomato, mozzarella, spicy salami, honey and you'll never look back. Enjoy in the new, bright and buzzy dining room, with friends and a cocktail in hand. / Paul Trainer

   
 

March 02 2014


where
The Abbey Theatre, 26 Lower Abbey Street, D1
Location Map

when
7:30 PM

how much
€30/€35

fundraiser
The 24 Hours Plays Dublin

If you’re reading this thinking there is no way you can stay awake through 24 hours of theatre, don’t panic - the title is somewhat misleading. This actually sees some of Ireland’s leading theatre makers create, rehearse and present six brand new short plays that have been developed over 24 hours. You only have to sit through three hours! Now in its third year this raises money for the Dublin Youth Theatre and features collaborations from some of Ireland's best known and most accomplished acting, writing and directing talent. Tonight is really all about the magic created when a group of artists get together; always eclectic, interesting and wondrous, anyone who enjoys raw creativity should love this. / Frances Winston

 

March 02 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7:30 PM

how much
€15

gig
The Jezabels

I distinctly remember first hearing them and it was in one fell swoop, from the opening guitar strains to the final chords, that they had me. Hayley Mary's black velvet vocals poured out of the speakers as Disco Biscuit Love and Hurt Me played on loop and I knew I had found something special, but as their name would suggest, suddenly they were everywhere. Endless Summer leaked from every radio, festival line ups cooed their name and it was made to clear to me I was not the only one. Self described as 'intensindie', they are particularly potent experienced first hand, those cavernous vocals riding the swell of moody guitars as they crest into a pulsing tidal wave of gothic electro rock. Despite being complete heart breakers, The Jezabels are one class act. / Sophie Donaldson

 


where
Moloughney's , 9 Vernon Ave., Clontarf
Location Map

when
see link

how much
see link


Moloughney's

For a while there, it felt like every top notch meal you ate in Dublin needed to be drowned in some sort of aerated foam, but luckily, we're moving back towards simpler wholesome food that you could probably replicate at home if you spent a year at the Corden Bleu and bought some dastardly chef knives. Moloughney’s in Clontarf Village is at the top of their game when it comes to locally sourced food  that manages to pique the palate's interest while also appealing to that childish need to eat and be comforted. The setting is homely in a refurbished Victorian house and weekends sees the place overrun with families in the true style of a bustling neighbourhood restaurant, although, if you're looking for more serene surroundings request a table upstairs. Blow-ins tolerated, nay - encouraged. / Aisling Kett

   
 

March 03 2014


where
Hugh Lane Gallery, 1 Parnell Square West, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
until May 25th

how much
Free

exhibition
In Art We Are Poor Citizens

To sleepwalk around this exhibition would be a tragedy. Gavin Murphy's In Art We Are Poor Citizens binges on the Hugh Lane's illustrious archive, and then purges with uber-modern sloganism interrupting the nostalgia. Clear perspex confuses the eye, and puzzles the message, creating a discombobulating viewing experience, but what we know, for the artist explicitly tells us, is that In Art We Are Poor Citizens. In the shelter of the Dublin Municipal Gallery, the product of immense philanthropy, we truly are poor citizens, allowed to gaze upon what most of us could not dream of owning. This exhibition is a statement, perhaps a little convoluted and left-of-centre for the iPhone age, but what remains is an idea for you to tease and reshape at will. / Kate Coleman

 


where
National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
9am - 6.30pm (closes 4.30pm Thurs/Fri/Sat)

how much
€6.50 sandwich


Cafe Joly

Tucked away within the National Library, Cafe Joly is one of those pleasurable finds where you'll find a roll call of artisan produce. Cashel Blue, Gubbeen pistachio salami, McLoughlins corned beef, Knockanore cheddar are the blackboard names you'd come to expect from its proprietors Michael O Malley and Brownyn Bailey who come steeped in experience from a multitude of past culinary capers in the city. Named after Jaspar Robert Joly who bequeathed quite a haul of manuscripts and other materials to the Library, Cafe Joly is far from the madding crowd but within an egg throw of those madsers in Leinster House. And do check out the most beautiful toilets in the city within the library whilst there. / Zach Joyce

   
 

March 05 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10:30 PM

how much
€10/€12

gig
Shlohmo

Distressed and chilled with a strong injection of electronic and smooth emotive lyrics to make you want to sway rather than drift off, Shlohmo is a master of sampling songs and making them irresistibly alluring. Collaborations are vast and varied including How To Dress Well, Little Dragon, Drake and The Weeknd - not forgetting the immense Jeremih track Fuck U All The Time. Primarily an electronic producer there is just as much R&B and hip-hop influenced sound. One half intensely emotional and on the other side just as intensely provocative. Last year's Laid Out EP is well worth a listen, with paired back progression from his original releases. Making an often niche genre more accessible with recognisable vocals could have gone so wrong, yet it just works. / Niamh Keenan

   
 
Little Macs We spoke to Alan from Little Macs in The George's Street Arcade.

I started here when I was 19, my brother opened the stall here 34 years ago and I came in two years later. It used to be packed here at lunch time, 70 people deep, all the hairdressers and the students from Bruce College. People are on a mad food buzz these days.

Rents have gone up everywhere, the overheads between staff and rates are crippling. They’ve packed in a lot more stalls here over the years, footfall has stayed the same but spending is down in the last three years since the recession. The rag trade used to be in this whole area, but it moved out to the industrial estates because rent was cheaper. Every space became a restaurant or a coffee shop, every bar started doing food… Dunnes, Spar, Centra, all put in deli counters and the whole area became a food area.

Everyone was taking a bite out of the apple, but there’s no apple left. A lot of filming went on around here over the years, so there’s been loads of celebrities in, between models and singers. €2.95 gets you a bag of chips, a burger and chips would be the most popular thing on the menu.

Portrait by: Des Moriarty