Dublin Selected *232

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From the red brick, leafy surrounds of South Dublin to the technically, but not really, Dublin/Wicklow seaside town of Bray, there are food spots, galleries, and theatres that exceed our unfairly philistine expectations of what suburbs should be.

2ha have been exploring suburbia for the past year, creating a zine with verve and purpose. We're proud to collaborate with them on this special edition of Le Cool, while also supporting their FundIt campaign for their next rake of issues.

They came to our attention because their approach to the suburbs was refreshing - not patronising or condescending, but respectful and academic. It's always nice to see the suburbs given their dues. So, we say: Ooh Aah Suburbia.

Who can finally admit they weren't born and raised Dublinese? Kate, Ciaran, Michael, Amy or Maria? With huge thanks to our guest-editor, Michael Hayes, editor of 2ha.

This cover is by Rory Bradley of 2ha, in celebration of the suburban issue
... Read More
   
 


where
Image: Andrew Clancy

when
depends

how much
depends


Suburbia + Language

Speed and movement are key ingredients in the uniquely suburban soup. Places can quickly be passed with little revealed but a sequence of names on a list. Travelling by dart/bus/luas however, makes for more interesting stories than most daily commutes. Each passenger travels two routes simultaneously – one in Irish and one in English. Joining the dots in between presents a hidden history of suburban occupation. For example, with the arrival of the Vikings, two independent and parallel naming traditions developed. While the local Gaels picked out geographic formations (Binn Éadair = Eadar's Peak), coastal features were of particular significance to the Norse culture of sea-farers. Rather than adopt the existing Irish version, the Vikings applied their own names to these maritime locations (Howth = Head). Click here for more on suburban placenames.

 


where
7 Strand Road, Bray.

when
see link

how much
depends


Platform Pizza

Come on! Break another little pizza my heart, now babay...you know you got it cos it tastes pizza goo-oo-ood. Pizza is one of life's great joys - a sliver of crisp pizza can hold the weight of all the great food groups, and barely break a sweat. It's like a brave soldier, dragging his captain to safety. Platform Pizza, in Bray, keeps its flavour combinations simple, and doesn't besmirch them with anything that would outrage an Italian (ie. pineapple). Well, maybe the one with breakfast sausages, but that's about as offensive as it gets. To a purist, like. To a simple enthusiast, this place is a grumbling stomach's saviour, the best local produce melted and bashing against yet more moreish morsels. This writer can stand no more - get me to the DART! / Kate Coleman

 

June 05 2014


where
Trinity , College Green, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
Thursday & Friday

how much
€30/€25

talk
Between Places and Spaces - Landscapes of Liminality

As an English student, I often used the word “liminal” without really knowing what it meant. This conference, organised by past and present PhD students of Trinity College, aims to clarify the term. It features panels and papers from a variety of disciplines within the humanities, all exploring man’s relationship to different places and spaces, and what it is to be caught between them. Topics include everything from “Female Rage and the Forest in Lars Von Trier’s Antichrist” to Jumanji and the Architecture of Liminality”, and a gallery space is to be run in conjunction with the event, showcasing work by local artists that ties in to the themes of the conference. With the hilarious and brilliant Bernice Murphy as keynote speaker, this event is one not to be missed by the scholars and bookworms of Dublin. / Kayla Walsh

   
 


where
Image: Bohernabreena

when
depends

how much
free


Suburbia + Leisure

Rooted in theories of Garden Cities, romanticised naturalism and Victorian medical advice, suburbia is best understood, not in terms of a traditional city, but as an inhabited landscape. The public realm of the suburbs is neither the marketplace nor the piazza, but the park. Dublin's peripheral parklands vary greatly in terms of design and origin. Some are former country demesnes (Marlay Park); some are pieces of working infrastructure (Bohernabreena Reservoir); others follow the valley of riverbeds (Tolka and Dodder parks); while a few are self-sustaining eco-systems (Fr. Collins Park). At a smaller scale, our housing estates are dotted by amorphous green spaces, often defined by little more than a concrete kerb. Despite their differences, each are tied together in making a landscape free of commerce, devoid of function and founded on leisure. / 2ha

 

June 05 2014


where
The Candle Bar, Kelly's Hotel, Drury Street

when
6:30pm-8:30pm

how much
Free

fashion
Fashion Insider: Zoë Carol

We call her Hong Kong Wong. Her HD personality belies the quiet confidence of the clothes she designs. Having already shown this Fall/Winter collection in London, the ladies of Dublin now have a chance to see (and pre-order) all the pieces in the cosy surrounds of The Candle Bar. The collection was inspired by aerial photography of the majestic glaciers of Antarctica. Contrasting textures and cool tones in pared down silhouettes make for a calm yet powerful effect. Silks, leathers and textured wools provide lots of touch-appeal and shades of ice blue, snow, steel. metallic pewter and black are super sympathetic to the Celtic complexion. These are wear anywhere pieces, cleverly commercial but utterly self-possessed. Want the tuxedo onesie. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

June 04 2014


where
IADT, Kill Avenue Dun Laoghaire South Co. Dublin


when
5pm (runs until June 10)

how much
Free

exhibition & opening
IADT Graduate Show

Yes it's that time of the year, time to unleash the graduates from years of graft and allow their mams and dads and friends and family to toast their talent. Fresh from IADT's photography grad show Ingrained comes the main affair. Yes it says 'open to the public' from Friday but if you're genuinely interested in catching the wave of first night excitement, ignore the joy stranglers and feel free to rock down to Kill Avenue for a goo and a gander. IADT is one of the true heartbeats of suburban creation in graduate courses such as animation, modelmaking, costume, makeup and production design as well as visual communication design, visual arts practice and film/TV production. Tonight they showcase their wares. / Zach Joyce

   
 

June 06 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
1.20pm, 3.45pm, 6.10pm or 8.35pm

how much
€9/€7.50

cinema
Jimmy's Hall

Earlier this year we were treated to John Michael McDonagh’s Calvary, a fable for the Ireland we live in today. Following on from that, we now have Jimmy’s Hall, a glimpse into an Ireland that could have been. That brief period of time when the oppression of London was swapped for the oppression of Rome. When international and modern ideas lost out to antiquated morals and a misplaced sense of what it meant to be Irish. From the people behind The Wind That Shakes The Barley, Ken Loach’s latest promises to at least get everyone talking and reflecting on what could have been. Between this and Calvary, cinema seems determined to make an example of Ireland in 2014. / David Cadwallader

 


where
Image: Michael Hayes

when
n/a

how much
n/a

2ha
Suburbia + History

Irish suburbia is a messy place. Inhabited over many centuries, the debris of past ages tend to accumulate into a bricolage of architectural styles, long forgotten functions and leftover artefacts. An obelisk rises above encroaching housing estates in Stillorgan, a dolmen keeps silent in Cabinteely, and a bottle-shaped barn is all that survives of a famine in Churchtown. At the edge of Monkstown Avenue roundabout sits a medieval castle, once occupied by an order of Cistercians who gave the area its name. These same monks came from St. Mary's Abbey (from which Abbey St. and Mary St. are christened), farming the fields of what was then countryside. The continual existence of such structures is a reminder that the relationship between city and hinterland has witnessed a long history. The phenomenon of suburbia might not be as modern as we think. / 2ha

 


where
208 Harold's Cross Road, Dublin 8.

when
see link

how much
see link


The Black Apple

Harolds Cross is funny neck o’ the woods. Sandwiched between trendy D8, rumbling Rathmines and stretching suburbia, it’s a place between a lot of places with stronger identities. But as we saw with Junior’s on Bath Ave. and The Fumbally on Clanbrassil St., a strong business with a strong identity can transform the most fallow stretches of ground and The Black Apple is ploughing its own furrow here in sleepy Harolds Cross. It’s a surprisingly spacious Saturday morning dream of bustling activity, kind-hearted staff, excellent coffee and everything from tasty gourmet bites to hearty fare. I have a particular affinity for the humble sausage roll and the Black Apple version is a spectacular success, which means I am finding myself drawn to this little corner of Dublin with increasing frequency. I suggest you do the same. / Emmet Condon

 


where
Bullock Harbour

when
Ring (0)1 280 6517

how much
depends


Bullock Harbour Boat Hire

One of the mysteries of this little city occurs whilst tucked away in the dense energy of the center; one often forgets the fact that we are blessed with the sea’s presence just a couple of kilometers away. Dublin’s coastline is one of its great attractions - from the straight sandy expanses of the North Co. Dublin coast, through the craggy cliffline of Howth, around the broad sweep of Dublin Bay and out towards the nooks and crannies of Dun Laoghaire and Dalkey - there are a myriad of adventures on our doorstep should we take up the mantle. One of the very finest ways to really explore this coast is to rent a boat from the chocolate box cute Bullock Harbour on a fine day. Putter out towards Dalkey Island, drop a line for some mackerel and look towards land to get a completely different perspective of the place we live. / Emmet Condon

   
 


where
Image: Architectural Survey 1971

when
n/a

how much
n/a


Suburbia + Modernism

The speed of transportation, the lack of streetscape and the emphasis on private, residential development often means that the architecture of suburbia can be easily ignored or overlooked. It is however, the place to discover some of the best modern buildings the city has to offer. UCD campus is a good start. While the original masterplan (by Andrzej Wejchert) has been undermined by more recent additions, a few individual gems still remain. Wejchert's own Arts and Administration buildings make for a civic and dynamic centrepiece, while Robin Walker's restaurant is a refined, complex work of glass and concrete. Elsewhere, there's the delicate brutalism of St. Fintan's Church, Sutton by Andy Devane and the suburban reticence of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Firhouse by de Blacam & Meagher (Just try to ignore the horrible pitched roof addition). / 2ha

 

June 07 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
5:30pm

how much
€9/€7.50

cinema
A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets

Mothers, brothers, lovers, we've all watched Pulp come on leaps and bounds since forming in 1978 with what is now a near-unrecognisable line-up. Early support of their art-rock stylings - Russell Senior screeching on the swings, and Jarvis telling you 'Oh you've got such a beautiful body/You'll make such a beautiful body' - brought them to the attention of John Peel, although still, stratospheric success eluded them. After nearly jacking it all in, they started to crawl into the charts, all Lipgloss and Babies, their poppier sound making way for the success of His & Hers, and crucially, the era-defining Different Class. This documentary will drag you from Sheffield to the stars, so hang on as tight as Jarvis' flares. It's gonna be one hell of a ride. / Kate Coleman

 

June 06 2014


where
National Concert Hall, 2 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2,
01 417 0077‎
Location Map

when
8.30pm

how much
€20

concert
Hauschka

Volker Bertelmann (Hauschka) is a pianist and composer who never shies from messing about with the possibilities of sound. Whether he's inserting ping-pong balls or tiny motors into his piano, he's always exploring and stretching the sonicscapes with his prepared piano technique. In Abandoned City, his latest album Hauschka explored ghost towns as a metaphor for the "sense of hope and sadness" he feels whilst composing. We're not quite sure how long he spent on this island. Listening to the likes of Thames Town gives one a sense of the busy interventions he's making in pursuit of truly exiquisite arrangements. Experimental yet eminently accessible, Herr Bertelmann is well deserving of your company and acquaintance. Win Tickets / Zach  Joyce

 

June 06 2014


where
Gresham Hotel, 23 O'Connell Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
12pm + 2pm

how much
€10 each

event
John Ford Symposium

Celebrating all things John Ford, this symposium also tends to land some fascinating panel discussions and guest speakers which on occasion seem to be reserved solely for the film and TV fraternity. However, if you want to catch Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and Whit Stillman (Metropolitan, the forthcoming Love and Friendship which is set to be filmed here) on directing or Sue Bruce Smith (12 Years a Slave) and Laura Hastings (Hunger) on producing, then there's chance to nab a ticket still. Of course, you could chill a bit more and go see a free screening of The Quiet Man with yer ma or Ford at War with yer da. And nothing really eclipses The Searchers in his ouevre which screens in the Savoy. / Zach Joyce

 

June 06 2014


where
National Concert Hall, 2 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2,
01 417 0077‎
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€16-€34

concert
Toumani & Sidiki Diabaté

Toumani Diabaté is a Malian griot, a hereditary musician, who plays the kora, the majestic 21-string harp-lute, once the instrument of choice at the courts of kings. His father was an exceptional kora virtuoso, the greatest of his generation, and Toumani has inherited and refined those skills, extending the range of the instrument and collaborating with musicians from other genres, from fellow-countryman Ali Farka Touré to Taj Mahal to Bjork, and from flamenco to jazz. This kora duo recital by Toumani with his son Sidiki is the rarest of events, and it will be fascinating to witness the interactions and musical conversations as the baton is passed to the next generation. From gentle harp-like delicacy to dazzling multi-layered tapestries of sound, this will be one to sit and savour. / Nigel Wood 

 


where
Anglers Rest, Strawberry Beds, Chapelizod, Dublin 20

when
Sun-Thurs: 12pm - 9pm

how much
starters from €5, mains from €15


The Angler's Rest

Where the strawberry beds sweep down to the Liffey, you'll kiss away the troubles from my brow. Nestled atop Knockmaroon Hill in Chapelizod is a bucolic hideaway whose threadbare-style elegance and open-fire snugness makes it the perfect, lazy day eatery. The only downside being that, without a car, you are unlikely to make the trip through the Phoenix Park and past the best view in Dublin to get there. Once there, wooden floors creak underfoot, the turf fire crackles and the food ensures you'll come back again. As it's run by the Wrights (of Howth), stick with the fish dishes, seafood chowder or crab claws and prawns for starters followed by the beer-battered fish and chips with crushed minted peas and tartare. Grow a beard, don an Aran jumper, pick up a dudeen and make your way out for some hours of Angler-styled, food-induced inertia. / Vernon Steel

 

June 08 2014


where
Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until 30 July

how much
Free

exhibition
Corita

‘How do you solve a problem like Corita?’ the more conservative nuns likely hooted when Sister Mary Corita began to create her colourful prints. The Californian fun-nun was an innovative art teacher in America during the social unrest of the 1960s, and blends graphics with words on attractive posters to promote love, community and creativity. She re-appropriates adverts and images from popular culture by etching quotations onto them. Pulling quotes from the Bible but also from Albert Camus, E.E. Cummings and the Beatles, Corita is a pleasantly surprising embodiment of piety and hippy-tude reconciled. Footage of Corita preaching her philosophy to flower-crown wearing arts students is set up alongside her prints and pulls the exhibition together. The gallery is giving Corita’s prints away to lucky visitors when the exhibition ends - so be sure to get your name down for a chance to win the raffle. / Maria Hagan

   
 


where
Unit 4 Phoenix Park Racecourse Castleknock Dublin 15

when
see link

how much
depends


The Lo-Cal Kitchen

Castleknock is more Castlerock since The Lo-Cal Kitchen moved in. Making healthy food with a 'F*** off Gillian McKeith" edge isn't easy, but they seem to be able to do it seamlessly. It's a colour-popping spot that takes the self-referential idea of 'health food' and makes it joyful, and slaps the po-face right off of it. Whether you're looking for a juice to put some hooray back in the day, after a not so lo-cal night out, or for a dinner that won't drive you to taking out gym membership - "The calories! The calories!", The Lo-Cal Kitchen is probably your saviour. The north side's food crown is really looking sturdy, eh? / Kate Coleman

 

June 09 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€26

gig
Pusha T

It’s not always a great idea for musical siblings to go it alone. Case in point being The Corrs, who I’ve neither forgiven nor forgotten for their ‘indefinite hiatus’. Sharon, Andrea, Caroline and especially Jim have struggled to replicate their fiddle-flavoured former glories but Virginian hip-hop hero Terrence ‘Pusha T’ Thompson has fared considerably better since moving on from Clipse, the outfit he once fronted with brother Gene. While Gene found God and accordingly changed his stage name from Malice to No Malice, Pusha T found Yeezus and inked a deal with Kanye’s GOOD Music imprint. Fresh from delivering the career-crowning solo album My Name Is My Name late last year, Pusha now makes his long-overdue Irish debut. The family ties may have been cut, but this one is unlikely to be short on bros. / Joey Kavanagh

   
 


where
107 Lower Georges St. Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.

when
Mon-Sat 8:30am-6pm, Sun 10am-6pm

how much
Depends


The Sunshine Café

The Sunshine Cafe is bright yellow, a marked change in the grey tonal palette of Dun Laoghaire's high street. Whatever the weather, the shop front is always twinkling with fairy lights, calling the fatigued charity shop trawler to their resting place. Kitted out in a classic French bistro style, the decor could hardly be called 'hip', but the promise of warmth and a hearty meal is genuine and unpretentious; something altogether more suburban in feeling. Meandering jazz usually scores the hustling backdrop of the Sunshine's regular clientele as their short but well-executed menu keeps a steady flow of patrons coming and going. Now serving Fixx, Sunshine has taken note of the improving coffee culture within the city limits and is making their produce stand out on the bean front. DLR? More like DLPhwoar. / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

 

June 10 2014


where
Theatre Uptsairs , Above Lanigan's Pub, Eden Quay, Dublin 1


when
1pm

how much
€10/€8

theatre
Zelda

When she lives in the shadow of an overbearing husband, how can a woman flourish? This show portrays the complexities of the question by staging the psychological turmoil of flapper, socialite, muse and artist Zelda Fitzgerald. She is an accomplished woman whose artistic self-confidence has constantly been undermined by her husband’s success. Naughton draws on Zelda’s real-life experiences and writings to provide a glimpse into her psyche during the last of her days. Zelda confides in the audience, recounting memories of her youthful nonchalance, of the golden days of ‘wine and roses’ and anecdotes of encounters with Hemingway. However it soon becomes clear how at odds her memories are with her reality. Sharon Coade’s sensitive performance skillfully conveys the torment of a woman both enamoured with and haunted by her husband. / Maria Hagan

   
 


where
Image: Michael Hayes

when
n/a

how much
n/a

2ha
Suburbia + Photography

Suburbia and photography have kind of grown up together. The emergence of industrialisation and mass housing in the 19th and consumer products. As a result, no other urban form has perhaps been so well visually documented within its relatively short existence. The 1970s in particular, seemed to mark a golden age of suburban photography. Think of the colonised plains of Robert Adams' The New West, the composed jumble of sunset strips in Stephen Shore's Uncommon Places or the cast of odd/ordinary characters in Bill Owens' Suburbia. But this focus has often been dominated by American concerns, so what about Ireland? Well we recommend checking out Shane Lynam's Inner Field series and Paul Seawright's The Map as a first step in discovering the material of Irish suburbia. century coincidently coincides with the advent of photographic technology. / 2ha

 


where
Lower Main Street, Rush, Co. Dublin.

when
Regular Opening Hours

how much
See menu


The Harbour Bar

For those looking to weigh anchor and leave the bright city lights behind, head a couple of leagues down the M1 to the quaint seaside town of Rush. Famed for marketing gardening, this town’s lesser known nautical history includes timber shivering tales of smuggling starring indigenous buccaneers like Luke Ryan and Jack the Bachelor. The Harbour Bar, located beside a picturesque anchorage is the ideal resting place for the famished landlubber. Following a brisk walk on the beach, enjoy a drink against the hearty glow of a warm fire as the convivial brethren of the coast and staff welcomes you ashore. With hearty bounty from the land and sea on offer, it’s hard to pass over the traditional fish and chips or a prize cut of rib eye on a stone. A perfect escape from those cold, encroaching evenings. / Aaron Purcell

   
 


where
Image: Luke Fallon

when
n/a

how much
n/a


Suburbia + Cinema

Suburbia + Cinema In the mid-1950s, Dublin was home to sixty cinemas across the city and county. Today, there are twelve venues located within the same area. During this period, not only have the number of cinemas shifted but their building types have altered significantly too. In the suburbs, demolition, conversion or vacancy have been the fate of many of the original movie palaces as shopping centre- based multiplexes dominate the market. Those that do survive (though in faded glory) can still be discerned by their art-deco or mid-century modernist details. Remnants of old-school glamour can be found* at the Cabra Grand (now a bingo hall), the Stella, Mount Merrion (now a furniture store), and the State (now a Des Kelly showroom). Click here for more on the history of Dublin's suburban cinemas. *poor eye-sight and imagination required. / 2ha

 


where
HX46, 46 Harold's Cross Road, Dublin 6W


when
see link

how much
see link


HX46

Almost always framed in the fanfare of neon lights, establishments offering a multitude of cuisines are almost always to be avoided, often resulting in a messy medley of half done dishes rather than a singular success. HX46 is basically the inverse of this, with a pared back interior of blonde wood, bare bulbs and white walls that serve as a clean backdrop for the four Asian cuisines on offer, each one handled with equal flavour and panache. The crispy duck pancakes with tangy hoi sin sauce and plump vegetarian spring rolls are firm favourites, whilst the nasi goreng arrives in all its glory topped with the customary fried egg. The brunch menu is a clever Anglo-Asian mash-up, with spicy noodles, cold beers and the traditional full Irish all on hand to quash even the fiercest of hangovers. / Sophie Donaldson

   
 


where
Greystones

when
see link

how much
see link


Greystones

Let's not beat around the bush. You go to Greystones for the eating. Sure, there's the charming seaside atmosphere, there's the death-defying cliff walk, and if you come by DART, the glimpse of the remains of Brunel's bridge. But really, it's all about the food. From the health conscious Happy Pear, to the excellent Indian Spice, to the charming French man making pizzas in an ancient Citroen van, the choice is vast. With the recent opening of Cafe Gray, there's now Dublin standard coffee too. To truly gourmandise your way through Greystones I recommend the following: start with brunch at Mrs Robinson's Kitchen, adjourn to Cafe Gray for coffee, lunch at the 3Q's, reinvigorate with a juice at The Happy Pear, dine at the legendary Hungry Monk (there's Gregorian chanting in the loo) and retire to Dann's, the most Irish pub this side of Clare, for a nightcap. / Alex Calder

 

June 11 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
16:15

how much
Free

talk
Resistance, Rebellion and Jazz: Ken Loach's Take on Irish History

A directing style depicted as social realism and a brave and gripping platform for the voices of Irish history which may never have been heard, Palme d’Or Winner and director of the highest grossing Irish-made independent film, Ken Loach has received both acclaim and criticism for his illustration of the Irish War of Independence. Often condemned for over-romanticising the Irish cause and corrupting the British in a callous manner, Loach is equally praised for an authentic view of the rebellion and for an arousal and revival of thought on the resistance as more than simply a nationalist struggle but a social revolution. Historical advisor to Loach on The Wind that Shakes the Barley and Jimmy’s Hall, Dr. Donal O’Drisceoil of UCC discusses Loach’s take on Irish life during and post civil war in this free and open-to-all event. / Claire Mullane

 


where
Image: Michael Hayes

when
n/a

how much
n/a

2ha
Suburbia + Typology

Space in Dublin's suburbs is synonymous with the semi-detached house. While it's difficult to establish with certainty the origins of this housing form, it's generally agreed that the first recorded scheme for an estate of semi-ds was as far back as 1794, at St Johns Wood, London. In Dublin, the shift from terrace to semi-d initially took place on Pembroke Road, built in the 1830s. Since then, changes in town planning, construction methods, domestic incomes and builders' profits have all altered the size and shape of the semi-detached house. As a typology, it has been applied from local authority housing to Victorian town houses and everything between. Cheaper, more flexible and more desirable than other house types, the success of the semi-d is ubiquitous, defining much of our city's urban fabric. Click here for more on the history of the semi-d. / 2ha

   
 


where
Ashtown, Navan Road, Dublin 7.

when
see link

how much
see link


The Halfway House

There’s that moment in every zombie film when the hero realises that a certain building or town has been lost to the zombies and is forced to concede defeat and retreat to survive. Dear Le Cool readers, that moment has sadly come for a certain place on Blackhorse Avenue. Lost forever to people who insist on letting their kids run around unsupervised, to people who will nurse a latte for two hours whilst occupying a table meant for a larger party. For those of you who live out that end of the town, your new waterhole is The Halfway House. Gorgeous ceilings, ample seating and incredibly friendly and professional staff mix with one of the finest pints of Guinness on the northside. / David Cadwallader

 


where
Rua Red Gallery, South Dublin Arts Centre Tallaght, Dublin 24.
Location Map

when
see link

how much
free


Rua Red

If making a list of things associated with Tallaght, popular entries might include crime, a certain dodgy TV show, and soccer. But did you know it’s also home to a cultural revolution, full of interesting destinations to whet your artistic appetite? In particular, check out RUA RED, a lovely multipurpose arts space with two huge galleries as well as a whole array of workshops, films, performances and more. With a focus on Digital and New Media art, the folks in RUA aren’t afraid to do things a little differently, and the galleries have featured everything from an interactive maze to an entire plane as well as hosting Ireland’s only digital arts festival – Glitch. And coming up in September you can expect to see a fully operational Wall Of Death in the gallery with, yes, motorbikes and all! / Rebecca Fitzpatrick

   
 
Arun Bakery

We barneyed about bread with Arun Bakery's Peter and Vlad...

If you go to any shop or restaurant that makes sandwiches - people think now, ‘what bread do they use?’ What flavour, what size, what colour, what type of bread do they want?

Our trade has grown based on quality and word of mouth. It continues to grow because people want value and quality. People are prepared to put their disposable income towards good ingredients. Our famous vlap - not vlaa anymore - was launched following discussion with Seaneen, Colm and Michael, of Mulligan’s, who are very much into real food and fermentation. So we devised that, and it became a door opener for us. 

Sourdough wasn’t something that people were too familiar with. It had been niched into high-end, so very much as an expensive item. We positioned ourselves as generic sourdough; it’s the mainstay of Europe, and we hope that ultimately, without competing in general with bakers, that we will compete with sliced pan and that it’s a byline to help change people’s habits to eating real food, real bread.

Arun Bakery are at H2G Market in Glasnevin every Saturday. PHOTO: Al Higgins