Dublin Selected *234

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You were either a kid who was a scallywag, or a kid who told on scallywags. And even the precocious "I'm telling on you!" kidz hid scallywag tendencies, without the getting caught bit. That's our conclusion anyway, but what's all this to do with Dublin? Well, they say a wasp will only sting you if it feels threatened. It's the same with humans.

We've been saddened by many instances this week of media figures and commenters assuming the worst of Dublin's young ones, and using derogatory language to do so. These kids are learning that they aren't wanted, liked, or useful. It sets a poor precedent that will reverberate into adulthood, and is essentially treating a young, impressionable person as worthless. We don't want to see Dublin's youth polarised into 'successes' VS 'hopeless causes'.

Go into Fighting Words, or various voluntary tuition programmes, and you'll see that if you give a kid a little time and attention, it may well be the most rewarding thing you'll ever do. Remember that you were once more preoccupied with breaking into your next-door-neighbour's garden to get a ball, than you were about how your coffee was roasted, and we'll all be okay.

Who thinks the kids are alright? Kate, Ciaran, Michael, Amy, or Maria?

"...playing Sonic and Streets of Rage over and over..." - Shane Gavin
... Read More
   
 

June 19 2014


where
NCAD, 100 Thomas Street, Dublin 8


when
Until 22nd June

how much
Free

exhibition
NCAD Graduate Exhibition

The days of finger painting are a distant memory for this year’s NCAD grads. From Gwyneth Grace’s elegant pâte de verre glass panels to a cat-crazy fashion line, photographic visions of veiled women, and hand crafted go-karts (yes, you’re allowed to have a go on them) the exhibition proves a treat. Nicola Whelan’s Portrait of the Artist as an Online Auction stands out - an exploration of the plight of the artist in the technological whirlwind of the 21st C. Projecting herself into the future by referring to herself as ‘the late artist’, Nicola’s series of exhibits express a nostalgia for physical artistic formats. She plays on nostalgias of today (an AA battery-powered walkman plays a CD version of a cassette tape) as well as those of the future. So get down to the National College of SMArt and Design - you don’t want to miss out on this one. / Maria Hagan

 

June 19 2014


where
Talbot Gallery, 51 Talbot Street, Dublin 1
Location Map

when
Until June 27th

how much
Free

exhibition
Cloy

No one who interns with goth-glam Gareth Pugh could possibly escape without some dark influences to inspire them beyond the fashion week cycle of fashion. Designer Sinéad Onóra Kennedy has escaped the shop-floor fate of many fashion graduates and applied her skill to this incredible exhibition, Cloy. Nip-tuck limbs are adorned with pins, commanding your mind to consider norms, when it comes to body shape and size. It takes the size zero minx out of that Hervé Léger dress, and reapplies the bandages in a fine-art sense. She has transcended fashion as a medium for the body, and turned it into sculpture. A truly eye-opening, contemplative body of work. No pun intended. / Kate Coleman

 

June 19 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
€9/€7.50

cinema
The Fault in Our Stars

This adaptation of John Green’s best-selling novel has been named tear-jerker of the year, the Ferrari of tear-jerkers in fact. Nonetheless it manages to be funny and honest in moments and tells an extraordinary and unconventional love story, without swallowing you into a blubbering dark hole. Shailene Woodley gives a gripping and emotional performance along with the emerging talent that is the baby-faced, Ansel Elgort. In an unlikely appearance, Willem Dafoe concerns himself only in the business of tragedy, free from ideologies and romance. With a soundtrack to be credited as a faultless complement to this story of star-crossed love, it is a must-see summer film. "The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings." / Claire Mullane

 

June 19 2014


where
The Laughter Longue, The Basement 4-8 Eden Quay, O'Connell Bridge, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€26

comedy
Best of Irish Weekend

Boom or bust, rain or "heatwave" we have an intuitive ability to see the funny side of life, even if it’s often viewed with a black undertone. We are credited as craftspeople in the art of storytelling, as naturally witty folk and often times our sense of humour is judged by our tolerance to take a good slagging. The roar of the Celtic Tiger along with the monotony of the recession has resulted in the birth of a comedy brainchild and the Irish comedy scene has certainly come a long way from paddywhackery and gags focused on the country’s drinking culture. This weekend, the Laughter Lounge presents the best that Irish comedy has to offer and the onus is on the audience to pick the winning act and crown the funniest person in Ireland; the country needs you! / Claire Mullane

 

June 19 2014


where
Olympia Theatre, 72 Dame Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Doors 7pm. 7.30pm (also Saturday & Sunday)

how much
€20-€75

opera
The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny

As the recipient of quarter of a million from the SKY Arts Ignition fund, there's a significant weight of expectation on the shoulders of this production of Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's political-satirical opera which first aired in 1930. The Olympia is transformed with some of the audience on stage, an orchestra in the stalls and performances from the boxes. While this is audacious, there's one fundamental problem and that's the fact opera singers don't use microphones and the Olympia is not purpose built. Hence you get snatches of something special being stymied which is all the more galling given the existence of surtitles for other elements. It's a brave undertaking and Claudia Boyle as lead soprano is impressive but it's a lesser known opera for a reason and therefore, needs everything to be pitch perfect to fan the flames of this city. / Michael McDermott

 

June 19 2014


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
7.30pm - 10.30pm

how much
€16-€18

gig
Fred Wesley Trio

In a week which saw the passing of the treasure that was Little Jimmy Scott, it's time to take stock on those rare occasions when legends pass through town without doing a Dylan on it. Fred Wesley is not just any trombone player but one who served as a cornerstone of funk earning his stripes as James Brown's bandleader and George Clinton's go to brass man before ending up with the Count Basie Orchestra. So all of this might mean little to you as a name but bingo, here's the killer, Fred also gave us House Party! Yes, now remember what happens when the likes of Lee Fields and the Expressions and Charles Bradley touch down in the Sugar Club, then think of the sunshine and being on the eve of Body and Soul. Oh there's Friday in between. Stick to that house party motto: "Maybe I'll get lucky, I'll just call in sick". Zach Joyce

   
 

June 20 2014


where
Various, see link.,


when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

festival
Dalkey Book Festival

When the sun begins to emerge from its cocoon, you have two options for the weekend: day drinking or getting the hell out of here. This weekend presents ample opportunity to escape the stuffy city environs while still getting your culture on with the four-day Dalkey Book Festival. The programme is as varied as it is impressive with the bill including acclaimed authors and journalists in conversation and debate, a spot of comedy and family-oriented events. The Irish contingent is represented by the likes of current 'it' boy Donal Ryan, Paul Lynch, Liz Nugent and John Banville, while Middle Eastern affairs nerd Robert Fisk, Salman Rushdie, Amos Oz and Kirsty Wark make up some of the international cohort. If you want a chance to stroke your chin in deep thought while soaking up rays, you know what to do. / Amy O'Connor

 

June 20 2014


where
The Light House Cinema, Market Square, Smithfield, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
8.45pm

how much
€7.50/€9

cinema
Jersey Boys

Legendary rockers Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons were portrayed as clean cut all American boys back in the day. However, behind the sharp suits and lilting harmonies lay a lot of darkness. From early involvement in petty crime to mob connections to shameless womanising this foursome were far from squeaky clean. Here their warts and all story is laid bare in this big screen adaptation of the hugely successful stage musical of the same name directed by none other than Clint Eastwood. This will have you tapping your toes thanks to the classic tracks which still sound as good as ever although it never gets as gritty as it could. On the whole though it’s an eye-opening offering that leaves you with a smile on your face but be warned - the songs will be stuck in your head for ages afterwards. / Frances Winston

 

June 20 2014


where
The George, 87-89 South Great Georges Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
Free

party
Pride Launch Party

The lead up to the marriage equality referendum has been a tumultuous time for same-sex equality. Amongst the achievements, losses and fiercely hashtagged support momentum continues to build and at no better time could the out, proud and loud fanfare of Pride march stridently through the city centre. The George, that stalwart institution that has seen many a bright eyed young thing crossed its hallowed threshold, is high kicking the festival off with the official launch party; gather your rainbow-striped paraphernalia and steady yourself for some seriously sequinned sass. / Sophie Donaldson

   
 

June 21 2014


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10

gig
Sleep Thieves

Sleep Thieves sit where electronica and choral collide, in the good Lord's electro-cathedral. 80s club-kid pop kid vibes surge through their discography; it makes you want to pump up your shoulder pads and backcomb your hair. If you still can't imagine it, Sleep Thieves have a delicate CHVRCHES kind of sound, but less warlike and more yearning and desperate (in a good way.) The female/male vocal is airy, beautifully complimentary, and what can you really say? It's the perfect 'lose yourself' summer soundtrack, dance-y with that 90s vocal edge. So close your eyes - really close your eyes - and float away. / Kate Coleman

 

June 21 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
10pm

how much
€24.50

gig
Smash Hits!

This is the best band in the world. S’tribute. Cover bands get a bad rap (less of that! - ed), but there is a great difference between the pub at the corner hosting a Stone Roses night, and Smash Hits' truly amazing live show. Accepting that simply playing nostalgic covers won’t cut the play-doh anymore, revel in a mash-up of Common People and Smack My Bitch Up, with an acoustic breakdown of I Want It That Way, all in the space of one minute. Not stopping at a single genre, Smash Hits flies through what feels like every popular song of the Live and Kicking and light-up platforms age, and comes out the other side reminding you of the brilliance of such a youthful and exuberant time in music. I am still waiting with Hubba Bubba-flavoured breath for the critical re-evaluation of Steps back catalogue. We’ll see who’s laughing soon. / Ciara Roche

 

June 21 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
12.00

how much
€5.20 - €8.90

cinema
God Loves Uganda

Few global stories in the past few years have resonated quite like Uganda's implementation of anti-homosexuality legislation. After gay activist David Kato was murdered after successfully taking legal action against a Ugandan tabloid that called for his hanging, filmmaker Roger Ross Williams was inspired to make this documentary exposing the influence exerted by the US evangelical movement on Ugandan politics. Williams' film details how prominent pastors visited Uganda to warn of a so-called "gay agenda" and helped prompt action from the country's lawmakers on the matter. Terrifying, eye-opening and powerful, God Loves Uganda is a stark reminder of the influence of the right, as well as the injustices inflicted on the LGBT community worldwide. / Amy O'Connor

   
 

June 22 2014


where
Morrison Hotel , The Morrison, Ormond Quay, Dublin 1
Location Map

when
3pm - 8pm

how much
Free

event
Dublin's First Equality Wedding Show

What is it that is so lovely about weddings? The declaration of togetherness, the reminder that we all have that one special person out there, or the chance to see two people beam with happiness as they begin the first day of the rest of their lives? At a same-sex marriage we can experience this and much more. For LGBT people to be able to announce a loving partnership is something that we should be proud of in our country. To watch a civil partnership is to see two people who are not only in love, but who may proudly declare their sexual orientation as an essential part of themselves in world where you may still be arrested, or worse, for being gay. A poll for Prime Time in April this year found that 76% of Irish voters were in favour of same-sex marriage. Not bad for a country that only ended the law against ‘buggery’ in 1993. / Ciara Roche

 

June 22 2014


where
Hugh Lane Gallery, 1 Parnell Square West, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
12pm & 3pm

how much
Free

concert
Beethoven Cello Sonatas

What could be more delightful of a Sunday afternoon than a visit the Sculpture Gallery of the Hugh Lane, where for the last 37 years concerts have been hosted at noon, delivering a wide repertoire of Irish and International music and musicians. This installment gives audiences the chance to attend two concerts and to enjoy ‘The Five Sonatas for Cello and Piano’ by the little-known German composer, Beethoven. Working in transitional periods between Classical and Romantic periods, these 5 sonatas span the three main creative periods of Ludwig’s career and offer an intimate sampler to his greater oeuvre. A performance at noon by Annette Cleary on cello and Dearbhla Brosnan on piano is followed by an afternoon performance by William Butt on cello and Lance Coburn on keys. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. / Dave Desmond

   
 

June 23 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
€9/€7.50

cinema
Chinese Puzzle

Romain Duris is back in the role of loveable Frenchman Xavier Rousseau. The Erasmus student of The Spanish Apartment is greying now and acutely aware of it. Chinese Puzzle plays on the nostalgia for student life of a group of old Erasmus friends facing the responsibilities of adulthood. When Xavier and his girlfriend break up, she moves from quaint, gay Paree to the high-rise apartments of NYC. Xavier follows for his children’s sake, but struggles to find his feet. The challenge? Devising creative (not-so-legal) strategies for getting a visa. Language barriers and culture-clash humorously celebrate New York as a melting pot of cultures whilst showing the city warts and all. Chinese Puzzle works better as one of a series than as a standalone film. But if you saw and loved the first two films, then this is well worth a watch. / Maria Hagan

   
 

June 24 2014


where
Royal Hospital, Kilmainham , Military Road, Kilmainham, Dublin 8
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
€44.50

gig
Paul Weller

Every time I buy a Weller ticket I feel a little bit dirty. I remember as a teenager feeling pity for older lads who got excited about going to see Clapton, a once cool proponent of cutting edge sounds who had by then turned to making music for your dad. Surely this is pretty much the same thing. I am my father. Still, when I arrive at the venue and Paul and the band get going I'm nineteen again as classic after classic blasts from the speakers. The songs of Stanley Road and Wildwood along with a few old favourites from The Jam and The Style Council drive the crowd into a frenzy. Even the newer tracks sound better live. Then it dawns on me. The purpose of Weller is to make you feel better about getting old. Maybe turning into your dad isn't a bad thing after all. / Mark Hoskins

 

June 24 2014


where
The Science Gallery, Trinity College, Pearse Street, Dublin 2
01 896 4091‎
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
€15

workshop
The Last Bite

I love food. The main reason I exercise is so I can eat more. I have a friend who recently told me she gets bored while eating and weeks later, I still can't get my head around it. While freelancing earlier this year I was somewhat underemployed and decided to go about becoming a domestic goddess with all this extra time I now had so I wouldn't go entirely spare. This path lead me down the road of clean eating. Not being one to countenance eating less, the idea of eating better was more appealing, bringing us to our much-maligned buddy, fat. But not all fats are created equally bad. A panel including double-Michelin starred chef Kevin Thornton are going to analyze that oft-unpopular but frequently delicious molecule, rounding off the Science Gallery FAT series. Bottom line, you'll prise my avocados from my cold dead hand. / Kate McEvoy

   
 

June 25 2014


where
Theatre Uptsairs , Above Lanigan's Pub, Eden Quay, Dublin 1


when
1pm & 7pm

how much
€10/€8

theatre
Tactics

When Maedbh pulls on the rubber gloves in Tactics, it certainly isn’t to do the washing up. The alluring Maedbh is a candidate to Dáil Eireann and plays dirty in more ways than one in the run up to the election. We get a glimpse  into the depths of the politician’s home life as she preps for an evening interview on RTÉ. What starts off as a woman playfully asserting her sensuality over the men in her life soon takes a turn for the worse - the mask slips and the extent of Maedbh’s determination to win is revealed. It becomes clear that she has been pulling people’s strings, applying the ruthless tactics of the political world to her personal life. If an eerie yet sexy political drama tickles your fancy on your lunchbreak, then pop into the Theatre Upstairs for a complimentary bowl of soup and an entertainingly disturbing show. / Maria Hagan

 
Irish Writer's Centre

We speak to Irish Writer’s Centre book buffs Brendan and Amy about what makes Dublin such a vibrant literary burg

Dublin’s literary scene is buzzing. Everybody’s writing, even if it is on the sly! But writing doesn’t have to be a closet activity. More and more people are willing to put themselves out there. Everybody has a book in them - the problem is getting them to sit and write it.

Today the Dublin writers’ scene is all about cooperation. There are a lot of opportunities for creative cross-pollination and support around the city. It’s at literary events like the ones that we hold at the IWC that people meet and encourage each other to get out there. We’re expanding the definition of the writer through our events. Poetry and novel writing are of the hour, but so are spoken word, storytelling and songwriting. We are introducing courses that include professional development now too so that people realise how practical the skill of writing is for arts reviewing, interviewing and criticism. The dichotomy of people talking about the craft and developing their skills in the stunning setting of the centre is a very special thing.

PHOTO: Daragh Soden