Dublin Selected *238

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Even the protagonists of Portlandia know that skills are transferable, and it’s about time that we all became less prescriptive about the application of knowledge in different ways.

Trade School Dublin has been an innovator in non-traditional learning since last summer, and they will be taking their devil-may-care-and-might-even-learn-something attitude to Summer Rising at IMMA this weekend.

The idea of Trade School is ‘barter for knowledge’, so a volunteer teacher, who might teach you anything from Spanglish (not really!) to life drawing, makes a list of things that they would like in return, whether it’s ‘an open mind’, ‘a pencil’, or ‘some coffee’.

If you have a skill - the art of trapeze, supafast bike repair cheats, or secret Bobby Fischer level chess genius at your fingertips, mail the Trade School and see if maybe you can do business. It’s just like they say - an eye for an eye, or in Trade School speak - an apple for some pidgin French.

Who be gettin’ taught this week, Kate, Ciaran, Michael, or Amy?

"It's called 'The Little Sea Lady'" - Paula McGloin
... Read More
   
 

July 17 2014


where
Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay D2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€20

gig
Phosphorescent

I first happened upon Phosphorescent while watching the film Margin Call. As the financial system descends into chaos, the lead character inserts his headphones to temporarily seek some respite from the increasingly fraught situation and soon the meditative, campfire-esque hymn Wolves fills the scene. Since then, I've been an avid follower of Matthew Houck's musical output. Last year's country-tinged Muchacho was rich in both sound and sentiment, with Houck alternating between moods of celebration and desolation. His music possesses a comforting timelessness that makes you feel as though you've heard it a million times, but in the best way possible. This intimate gig ahead of his stint supporting The National promises to be all kinds of special. / Amy O'Connor

 

July 17 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6.30pm

how much
See HERE

cinema
Girlfriends

"I think one of the most interesting Hollywood films, well not Hollywood - American films - that I've seen in a long time is Claudia Weill's Girlfriends," said Stanley Kubrick in an interview in 1980. "It wasn't a success, I don't know why; it should have been. Certainly I thought it as a wonderful film." Despite this ringing endorsement, Girlfriends was condemned to relative obscurity for decades. Then, in 2012, Lena Dunham helped give it a new lease of life as she loudly and repeatedly cited it in interviews as an influence and enlisted Claudia Weill to direct an episode of Girls. A smart, sensitive exploration of female friendship to which Frances Ha is indebted, think of it as the most influential film you've never heard of. A rare chance to see this overlooked gem.  / Amy O'Connor

   
 

July 17 2014


where
National Concert Hall, 2 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2,
01 417 0077‎
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€15

screening
Metropolis

Fritz Lang’s 1927 flick Metropolis is one of the most seminal films of the silent era and the first ever feature length sci-fi movie to hit the big screen. It features special effects that were way ahead of their time and even has the approval of Queen who used clips from it in their classic video for Radio Ga Ga. Therefore it’s no wonder that 3epkano have selected it as the latest vehicle to display their composing and performing talents. The Dublin-based quartet have dedicated themselves to producing original soundtracks for silent and avant-garde cinema for a decade now and this event actually marks this significant anniversary. Even without this new soundtrack the movie still stands up as a masterpiece so this collaboration can only serve to make it even more epic. Win Tickets / Frances Winston

 

July 17 2014


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€20

gig
Theo Parrish

With a new album due for imminent release, Detroit’s deep-house legend is bringing his live show to town. Well known for his epic eclectic DJ sets as much as his pioneering work as a producer, this time Parrish is taking the music back to its roots with a full live band performing deconstructed versions of his own music as well as the songs he has sampled over the years. The line-up of this stellar ensemble includes Funkadelic collaborator Amp Fiddler on keys, Duminie DePorres on guitar and Myele Manzanza on drums amongst others, and joining them on stage are four dancers to help put the “get down” in Teddy’s Get Down. With a warm-up selection of music programmed by Parrish himself and a post-gig DJ set by Corkman Colm Kenefick, this promises to be one sweaty night of infectious jazzy & funky house grooves. / Dave Desmond

   
 

July 18 2014


where
Gate Theatre, Cavendish Row, Parnell Square, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€25-€35

theatre
The Price

Rickety chairs are suspended from the ceiling. A harp stands regal amongst clutter, dusty with memories. Ballgowns that dwell on dancefloors conquered glitter from between the doors of the hefty wardrobe. The set is definitely the most try-hard aspect of The Price, which sparkles with life, despite being about death. The entire production is elevated by a Broadway import, Lewis J. Stadlen, who sets the play alight. His Yiddish charms are many, and the authenticity of his performance allays you of those usual moments of questioning the validity of accents, (as we judged Julia Roberts in Michael Collins, so we shall judge every person who dares to do an accent thus). With Miller’s astute, biting script giving proceedings concrete foundations, The Price is one of the tickets of the summer. / Kate Coleman

 

July 18 2014


where
Baker's Bar, Corner of Meath Street and Thomas Street

when
1:30pm

how much
Free

readings
Sean O'Connor - Growing Up So High

Forget Sinead O’Connor’s open letters, and come for a schooling in tenacity and ambition from her father, Sean O’Connor. His is a true Liberties story - born into the cheeky, slang-slinging heart of Dublin 8, he may have left school at the tender age of thirteen, but that did not prevent him from growing up into an over-achieving adult, first as an engineer, and later as a barrister. He has written a colourful memoir of his young years, spotted with anecdotes and sparkling moments of wit, which make for an enthralling tour of the Liberties, as it once was. Shops and people may have passed into the ether, but what remains is the spirit of the Liberties, the sense of community, storytelling, and good humour that also happens to provide the sturdy backbone to the Liberties festival in general. Good Dublin sorts. / Kate Coleman

 

July 18 2014


where
IMMA, Military Road, Dublin
01 6129900
Location Map

when
8pm - 1am (Sweatbox til late)

how much
€20 (€5 with wristband for Sweatbox)

performance
Werk

Conceived by those deviant delights thisispopbaby, Werk has been off the radar and gaydar for some time. Where better to sashay back than in the stain-glassed surrounds of the chapel at IMMA? Encouraging application of Factor-99 sunscream for protection and maximum enjoyment of their heat rash of disco, live art and performance, expect  some "art wank" going down too all under the supervision of the inimitable Panti. The last time IMMA left revellers party in the premises was at a sweaty betty 90s rave back in the spring. There's a bang of Berlin off the space as you dream of arriving there at 3am. Best snap into the spirit of the law though and get there early, soak it up and spit yourself out at 1.30am and on to the Sweatbox afterparty in The Hub. That's how to Werk it real good. / Michael McDermott

 

July 18 2014


where
The New Theatre, 43 Essex Street East, Dublin 2
01 670 3361
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€15/€12

theatre
Low Level Panic

This review comes with a shout-out to nine year old Aoife McMahon, who stacked it on her way on to the stage, held back her tears, embarrassed, but kept the show on the road. In a way, it mirrored the entire play, which is all about keeping it together. Telling the story of two housemates, and a third house-pariah, Low Level Panic explores the porn-lite laden culture in which we live, where a party is narrated on Twitter through a series of ‘Slane Girl’ and Bartoli themed jokes. This play benefits from cruel wit in the writing, an impressive set, and intelligent social commentary, although the small stage puts constraints on the production, which includes an expansive male cast, stifling the visual presentation of the piece, at times. But it's ambitious, so why not? / Kate Coleman

 

July 18 2014


where
Theatre Uptsairs , Above Lanigan's Pub, Eden Quay, Dublin 1


when
1pm/7pm

how much
€10

theatre
A Picture of Us: A (sort of) Musical

A Picture of Us: A (sort-of) Musical, collates snapshots of a formative relationship. The only thing that this play is non-committal about is sticking to the timeline, which makes for a disjointed narrative, not unlike that topsy-turvy, icky relationship with time that comes with being in love. This percussive piece is charming, with the leads admirably toiling with their emotions, after the wide-eyed revelations about apple juice and wax museums have faded from adorable quirks into stains in the carpet. Nothing to talk about, but they’re there. The set, which we first view as stacks of instruments arranged into a formation that could almost be a White Stripes LP cover, is disassembled, then reassembled - like the opening and closing of a book, which perfectly describes this neat, sweet love story. / Kate Coleman

 

July 18 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
€20

screening & live performance
The Living Room

This is a lesser known work from the distinguished canon of filmmaker Shane Meadows (This is England, A Room for Romeo Brass). It might be down to the fact that he's only getting around to showing this 2009 documentary now. Concerning his close friend and music collaborator Gavin Clark (UNKLE, Clayhill), it's a more personal affair. Even though Meadows was playing in an indie band in the late 90s along with Paddy Considine, he claims Clark made him jack it in. "The second he sang I quit." Citing the simplicity and honesty but most of all Clark's voice, Meadows has remained a firm friend and fan down the years. Tonight the screening will be followed by a live performance by Clark, accompanied by members of folk band The Leisure Society, including Nick Hemming who was also in the band with Meadows. A true band of brothers. / Zach Joyce

   
 

July 19 2014


where
IMMA, Military Road, Dublin
01 6129900
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
Free daytime events

festival
Summer Rising

It’s that time of year again when friends and occasional well-wishes are returning from (increasingly) obscure corners of the world with tales of fevered bacchanals at festivals you’ve never heard of which may not actually exist. ‘Yeah, but Sodom&Gomorrah Rocks in Bratislava just feels more real, y’know…’ They can keep it, Summer Rising in the splendid environs of IMMA promises to be an altogether more civilised, indeed civilising affair. You will find an embarrassment of riches amongst varied events spanning ten days. Art, music and performance will be going at it night, noon and morning. Righteous food will be on-site from Cake Cafe, The Hare and Killer Sandwich. Expect most of Stoneybatter, some Birkenstocks and children who have never known the meaning of a proper haircut. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

July 19 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
2.20pm & 4pm

how much
€8.60/€10

cinema
Finding Vivian Maier

They remember her as reclusive, somewhat eccentric and mysterious. They thought she might have been from France but kept their distance. They were her employers after all and she was the nanny. When John Maloof spent $400 on a box of images depicting 1960s Chicago in a flea market little did he know that when he finally looked at the negatives, he would start a trail of discovery bringing to light the phenomenal and extensive photographic work of Vivian Maier. Up to 100,000 negatives, 3000 prints, hundreds of rolls of film, audio recordings and Super 8. Maier captures what Studs Terkel once called "the etceteras" of the world. She was destined to be one herself but now her and her subjects are likely to live forever through her lens and our eyes. / Michael McDermott

   
 

July 19 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10pm

how much
€12/10

gig
Ed Davenport

You'll be needing something with some extra bit of life to keep you going after a long day of Longitude (or a long day of wishing you were at Longitude) and London boy Ed Davenport could be just the thing. After a popular stint playing at home in England, Ed did as many good producers do and made the move to good ol' Berlin. He continues to have a distinctive slow burning and hypnotic sound (especially at a certain hour in the morning) and before you know it you'll be bopping along unbeknownst to yourself in the Pepper. Less harsh than your average techno set, Ed Davenport is sure to provide you with a smooth and timeless selection of tracks. Support on the night comes from Dublin collectives Smalltalk and Stompdown. Techno, techno, techno. / Niamh Keenan

 

July 19 2014


where
National Concert Hall, 2 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2,
01 417 0077‎
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€30-€35

concert
Altan

The pure drop, Donegal style, will reverberate around Earlsfort Terrace as Altan take to the stage for their only summer Dublin appearance. Altan were formed out of the music and personality of the late Belfast flautist Frankie Kennedy, and Gweedore singer and fiddler, Mairéad Mhaonaigh. Indeed, nearby Lough Altan gave its name to the band. With over 25 years of playing together, Altan have established themselves as one of the best live acts playing traditional Irish music globally. At the heart of Altan’s DNA is the Donegal style of traditional music. Put simply, Donegal repertoire and style has many influences from Scottish fiddle music and dancing. This very often driving style of playing, coupled with Mhaonaigh’s crystal clear singing in Irish and English, goes some way to explain the band’s enduring appeal. / Des FitzGerald

   
 

July 20 2014


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
7.30pm

how much
€20

gig
Owen Pallett

Oscar-nominated composer (for Her), occasional Arcade Fire member, in-demand collaborator, recent (and highly entertaining) pop song theoretical analyst and gifted violinist - Owen Pallett has many strings to his bow. For the artist formerly known as Final Fantasy, finding time to draw breath, never mind maintaining a prolific, high standard solo output, must be hard at the best of times. Visiting the capital on the back of his most recent and fully realised album, In Conflict, Pallett is arguably at the peak of his art-pop writing powers. Past shows have been spellbinding affairs with the Montreal-based musician deconstructing his own intricate songs, then rebuilding them in layers using only violin and looping pedals. For those who like their pop music to tease the brain and soothe the heart, set your expectation levels to High! / Brian Keane

 

July 21 2014


where
Noshington, 186 South Circular Road, Dublin 8. 

when
Regular opening hours

how much
Free, sales benefit ISPCC

exhibition
Pho20graphy

Prizing the artwork which hangs on the wall and the food on your plate in equal measure, Noshington Cafe on Washington Street’s corner provides a summer haven for good nosh and local artwork alike. In a twenty year retrospective of Barry McCall’s most influential and iconic work, Pho20graphy is brought back to life in large print showcasing McCall’s renowned style and his flair for blending classic with contemporary. His inspiring portfolio includes high fashion shoots with Claudia Schiffer and Helena Christensen which have graced the pages of Vogue, famed images of Liam Neeson in his New York home and stunning black and white portraits of the late David Kelly and Brendan Gleeson among others. McCall’s portraiture succeeds in personifying the Irish charm and captures beauty timelessly in an ever-changing artistic landscape. / Claire Mullane

   
 

July 22 2014


where
The Light House Cinema, Market Square, Smithfield, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Begin Again

Going back to the musical roots that served him so well in the Oscar-winning Once, director John Carney has crafted another whimsical romance that is as much about the songs as the drama. When I saw Keira Knightley was going to be the lead actress and do her own singing I was far from excited but she actually has an OK voice, if a little thin. She plays Greta, a singer-songwriter who finds herself dumped by her boyfriend in New York before being courted by Dan, a disgraced record label executive played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo. Together they decide to make an album using the city as their studio and what follows is a series of pleasant ditties and glorious New York skylines. Although twee in parts this is ultimately a sweet feel-good flick that wears its heart on its sleeve and will leave you with a smile on your face. / Frances Winston

 

July 23 2014


where
Ranelagh Arts Centre, 26 Ranelagh, Dublin 6


when
11am - 6pm (until Aug. 9)

how much
Free

photo exhibition
Allen Kiely - Close Up

It's fair to say Allen likes travelling. I've had occasion to meet him about to head off to capture the funeral of Nelson Mandela or just back from a jaunt around South East Asia. Of course, when on the ground here he's off shooting the wonders of Body & Soul. This exhibition, entitled Close Up, concerns work of his where he simply captures the expression, the range of emotions on display and some which lie beneath. With 20 portraits, this collection encapsulates many faces from around the globe. However, it's the eyes which hook us in as we seek an understanding as who these people are. Does the smile convey happiness or merely a performance to the camera? Does the diffident glance act as a shield or an allure? We will never know but can appreciate their brief encounter with this photographer. / Michael McDermott

   
 
Made It

We spoke to Aoife Crowley, Emily Carson, Zoe Jellicoe, Lucy O'Sullivan and Mary Plunkett about making it, and Made It

We got together to put on an event series because we knew so many people doing really interesting things, and we wanted to learn how they got their projects off the ground. For somewhere so small, Dublin is mad vibrant, and full of creative people working across a range of really exciting and diverse areas.

Made It is really about encouraging people to regain a confidence in their own creative abilities and to feel pro-active about going out and trying something new. The idea of the series is to give people some real industry advice and ideally inspire them to go out and make something of their own.

The interdisciplinary nature of Made It makes it stand out a bit from other events. The idea was to foster interaction between different creative fields - that people who attend one event would be interested coming along to another one which might be out of their comfort zone.

Made It's next event is How To Get Published, 22nd July, Twisted Pepper. PHOTO: Sarah Orr