Dublin Selected *252

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"I met him a couple of months ago. He had just been deported from another country, after being wrongfully imprisoned. He asked me for some money, but I'm a lawyer, and was able to look into his case a little, and my partner and I asked him to join us for lunch."

This is an excerpt of a chat we had with a totally anonymous, empathetic stranger outside Grogan's a few weeks back. There are so many barriers to aiding to the homeless - the fear you'll be fuelling a dependency on drugs, or urban myths about people who are professional beggars, that we forget that there are so many ways of showing some compassion. Buy a them sandwich. Have a chat. Point them in the direction of a professional who could help.

Either way, homelessness is a huge problem in our society, and food is a small way in which anyone can make a positive difference. SVP have done food runs for years, while a new initiative from Focus Ireland, Street Smart, gives you the option of adding €2 to your bill in participating restaurants that will fund a meal for those who live in need of Focus Ireland's tireless help. If you are a proprietor, we would urge you to get involved, and if you are a consumer, please seek out the project when it launches on November 20th.

Who thinks 'it could be you' is more than just a Lotto motto? Kate, Michael, Olivia, or Ross

"You can't beat a payday when you don't have to make your own packed lunch!" - Colm O'Connor
... Read More
   
 

November 13 2014


where
46 Harrington St.

when
Until 5pm

how much
See link


Sister Sadie

One of us likes quinoa, the other doesn't. One of us digs yoghurt, the other would rather it didn't exist. One of us sometimes fancies a plant based lunch, the other is violently opposed. So one of us always has a bit of a hard sell to make a visit to Brother Hubbard's happen. The same was true when this long awaited Southside sister to the beloved Brother opened its doors. Finally, the promise of a steaming hot meaty tagine (oo-er) on a cold and rainy day put us at a table, and even then, Turkish eggs won the 'who ordered better competition'. All the regulars are all there; the famous pulled pork sandwich, salads galore, cinnamon scrolls, chatty staff, beardy punters and Design Goat fixtures. Once the box-fresh look gets worn off it'll feel like one of the family. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

November 13 2014


where
City Assembly Building, South William Street, Dublin 2


when
until November 16th

how much
Free

exhibition
One Strong Arm presents FIRST THINGS FIRST

Call me Ishmael. The past is a foreign country, they do things differently there. If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born. All this happened, more or less... Has your mind’s eye been slung about like a drunken time-travelling sailor? These tantalising words should conjure up open seas, war ravaged cities and solipsistic meditations on existence itself. What we are of course discussing here is the first in what will hopefully be many collaborations between a fresh out the box screenprinter and some of our finest artistic talent. Mick Minogue is the extravagantly festooned tugboat helping to crack a bottle of bubbly at the launch of the artistic ocean liner that is One Strong Arm. If you like your books and you like your art then this killer combo is for you. / Simon Judge

 

November 13 2014


where
Theatre Upstairs, Above Lanigan's Pub, Eden Quay, Dublin 1


when
until November 22nd

how much
€10/8

theatre
Stella Full of Storms

Long monologues tend to make me feel sort of sick to my stomach with anxiety, like when someone at a talent show sings the whole of “Landslide” by the Dixie Chicks out of key and you have to forcibly prevent yourself from laughing/crying/exploding. This entire show is a monologue in the character of a teenager in the angst filled throes of young love. And it was great. Clodagh Mooney Duggan pulls it off so convincingly and with such ease that you forget she’s performing. She manages to have you empathising with her, laughing with her, relating to her, and pretty much despising every other character in the story as much as she does. The Notes On A Scandalesque plot is not only convincing, it’s dark and clever— portraying a girl’s struggle with sexuality, self-worth and revenge. It acknowledges that teenagers are a bit melodramatic and ridiculous sometimes, but reminds us that they're not as far off from adults as we pretend they are. / Olivia Rutter

 

November 13 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€9

cinema
Set Fire to the Stars

Set three years before Dylan Thomas’ death, this movie charts the poet’s first visit to America. Played by Welsh actor Ceyln Jones, Thomas is brought over to the states by John Malcolm Brinnin (Elijah Wood), who immediately becomes the babysitter for the rowdy, self-described “horrible little imp” as he tries to keep him sober/ alive long enough to get to the locations on his tour. The movie is shot in crisp, dramatic monochrome, with a jazzy soundtrack composed by Gruff Rhys. It gets a little confusing and abstract at times, but that only helps you sympathise with the continually anxious Elijah Wood. The many dramatic cuts to black had me constantly worried the movie had ended before I was ready. If you enjoy stories about tortured, mischievous artists or Dylan Thomas’ poetry, silver-tongued Ceyln has definitely got the self-pitying rascal character and beautifully dramatic poetry recitation down./ Olivia Rutter

   
 

November 13 2014


where
See link

when
Until November 16th

how much
€10/7/5/3, many events Free of charge

festival
Dublin Book Festival

As someone who spent four years of college reading everything from Winnie the Pooh to The Waves, and who refuses to renounce her tea-splattered and chocolate-smudged books in favour of a characterless Kindle, the Dublin Book Festival fills me with unbridled joy. This year’s event will run for four days and feature a massive variety of talks, debates, interviews, launches, readings and workshops. Highlights for grown-ups include a Victorian literary walking tour of the city, a meet-and-greet with publishers and agents, a short story workshop, a spoken word showcase, and (fairly randomly), a craft beer tasting and baking demo. There will also be appearances from Peter Sheridan, writer and director of Borstal Boy, and Donal Ryan, who was long-listed for the Booker prize for his work, The Spinning Heart. Bookworms unite! / Kayla Walsh

 

November 13 2014


where
1 Lower Rathmines Road, Rathmines

when
Until 6pm

how much
Depends


Grove Road Café

The pendulum of public opinion, (and by that I mean my father) seems be swinging back against the plethora of gluten-free food now available. For some it's a necessity, for others, it's a dietary choice, but my attitude is that tasty food is simply tasty food, and Grove Road's gluten-free cookies are just damn good. Their other treats come from my infinitely more culinary-talented namesake at Wildflour Bakery, and her dark chocolate and sea salt caramel brownies rock my world. My devotion to Grove Road does however transcend their baked goods selection and proximity to my house. The service is top-notch, in that they always successfully feign that they’re happy to see me, and they use tasty fresh produce to dish up real comfort food. Ideal for when you're in need of a hug and a sausage sandwich of a Sunday morning. / Kate McEvoy

 

November 13 2014


where
RHA Gallery, 15 Ely Place, Dublin

when
Until 5pm

how much
Depends


Coppa Café

Much to my surprise, Coppa was introduced to me by my parents. I kept hearing tales of fabulous coffee and pulled pork and these “cool and charming Italians” (that was my mother). This couldn’t possibly be right. How could they have heard of a new Dublin cafe before me? And a gallery cafe - they’re never any good! I went there, determined to prove them wrong, but they were right. The coffee is some of the best in town, the pulled pork sandwiches ARE the best, the Italians are charming, the tiny gingham napkins are adorable, the typeface used in the logo is just so mid-century Italy it hurts, and there are artists everywhere (so Bohemian). My parents beat me to it, this time. But it’s only because they draw at the RHA. Not because they’re cooler than me. / Alex Calder

 

November 13 2014


where
66 Capel St, Dublin 1

when
Until 9pm

how much
Depends


Mish.Mash

After a certain hour it’s quite difficult to find somewhere to go for a non-alcoholic drink, that isn’t a bar. Mish.Mash offers just that, as well as being open for your first caffeine hit and lunch. A small little café Mish.Mash is decorated eclectically with simple furniture, Edison style hanging lights, paper bunting garlands and at night, a glass block floor outside that lights up with multi-coloured lights. Basically it’s adorable. The tea and cake menus are my personal fave, try and find a better apple and cinnamon cake or prettier tea pot, but these guys do more wholesome savoury food too. Down the very far end of Capel Street Mish.Mash could be easily missed, but trust me it’s well worth seeking out. / Niamh Keenan

   
 

November 14 2014


where
1 Victoria House, Haddington Road, Dublin 4

when
See link

how much
See link


Asador

It’s not about the room, neither is it about the attentive, twinkly-eyed (male) service. The clue is in the name. This place is all about the grill. The medium is the message. Asado is a Latin American term for barbecue, the Asador is the man who tends it. The specimen here is a beauty, about eight feet long and fed with a mix of hardwoods and charcoal. Every hunk of meat upon it is kissed with the perfume of its woodsmoke. These are kisses that will linger long in the memory. Their well-marbled rib-eye is as good as any in the city, perfectly pink slices of lamb rump honoured the animal they came from. Steak tartar (sic) was better than many I’ve eaten in Paris and the ribs make a mockery of others around town. Excellent ingredients simply prepared and beautifully cooked. Bravo. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

November 14 2014


where
Rio Rodizio 27 Ranelagh Dublin 6 Phone: 01 496 9138 rio.ie

when
See link

how much
See link


Rio Rodizio

Does Ranelagh need another eatery? Debatable, but this latest arrival is original enough to draw punters from beyond the D6 pale. The Brazilian community is already flocking to what is pegged as Ireland’s first authentic churrascaria, adding eye candy to a handsome room decked out in slick, clean-cut style. The deal is simple: pay a set price per person and eat all you like of a dizzying array of Irish-sourced, Brazilian-cut meats carved table-side by proud passadores. When you need a breather (and you will, if you’re after a marathon rather than a sprint) simply switch your personal disc from green to red, and those passadores will pass you by, allowing you to graze the impressive salad bar. But be warned: like the dangerously good fries and complimentary desserts, this are mere distractions from the serious meat-fest business at hand. / Aoife Carrigy

 

November 14 2014


where
19 Clanbrassil Street Lower, Dublin 8. 

when
Lunch and evenings from 6.30pm

how much
€12 (average)


Ruttinculo

It's taken a while to finally find a place which can compete with my two favourite Italians in Dublin - Fusco's on Meath Street and Terra Madre on Bachelors Walk but Ruttinculo is a contender. On the corner of a strip of kebab houses, the attractive red and white hue and basic interior is generating the latest food buzz with good reason. It's simple, solid, delicious Italian cooking brought to you by Nora Mori. It won't have you misleading Clanbrassil Street for the rustic Tuscan hills but will make you reconsider classic dishes such as lasagne and carbonara and even broaden your vocabulary and considerations with Spezzantino (stew) and Polpette (meatballs). It's quickly turning into a lovechild of the foodie front and less of a 'ruttinculo'. It's was also booked out last night (Wednesday) when I tried to go back. Forewarned! / Zach Joyce

 

November 14 2014


where
105 Clonskeagh Rd, Dublin 6

when
Until 10:30pm Friday/Saturday, 5pm Sun-Monday

how much
See link


The 105 Café

I’ve never quite understood Clonskeagh. What exactly is it for? Where is it at? Perhaps it exists as an escape route from the increasingly dyspeptic atmosphere of Ranelagh. Nevertheless, the charming 105 Café should provide reason enough for an excursion. Every neighbourhood should have a place like this, solid and reliable in every way. You won’t need to have your food explained to you and you won’t ever experience menu anxiety. The steak and eggs has everything that I need in life, the (cooked to order) burger deserves a fanfare. The pretty, feminine room is a great place to linger over brunch. Of a midweek evening it would make a nice place to share a bottle and remember why you are in a relationship with the person opposite. Don’t leave without trying the carrot cake. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

   
 

November 14 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See link

how much
€7.60/€9

cinema
The Imitation Game

Fittingly released just after Armistice day, The Imitation Game is a character drama based on the life of Alan Turing. At surface level, The Imitation Game is taut and distinctly British thriller. Divided into three sections, dealing with Turing as a young boy, his work in during Wartime and his later life and conviction for indecency. The film suitably weighs in heavily on Turing’s Wartime efforts. A gifted cryptographer, Turing’s pioneered an electromechanical machine to break German Enigma codes at a time when German naval power was strangling the supply lines to Britain. Aside from Turing’s wartime work, the film deftly deals with the morality of Turing’s treatment at the hands of Allied intelligence which contrasts sharply with the ‘Good Versus Evil’ narrative of the second world war. A fitting tribute to an often overlooked hero. / Jack Broughan

 

November 14 2014


where
Olympia Theatre, 72 Dame Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€40/30

theatre
Howie the Rookie

If you’ve spent much time in Dublin, you’ve probably met The Howie. Or The Rookie. Maybe both. One’s a thug, one’s a lothario. You’ve nodded howyeh in taxi ranks and pub toilets. They’re from the same strip of anonymously crap suburban hinterland around the capital. They’re both called Lee but they’re not related. They’re both having a bad night. They talk in this choppin’ an’ changin’ slang that only sounds plausible when written at the end of the last decade - oh, the decade before that - by a then-unknown, now-famous playwright called Mark O’Rowe. Like, Hollywood famous. You might know whose night is worse, or who gets the bad rash, and you might be wrong. And you’d be a fool to miss them both played by one actor, when that actor is Tom “Nidge” Vaughan-Lawlor, largin’ it live on a bare stage in front of you at the Olympia. Go. / Brian Lavery

 

November 14 2014


where
CHQ Building, IFSC, Docklands, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€8

screening
Moneyball with Smashing Science

As part of their Smashing Science Programme, UCD Science Expression will host of Bennett Miller’s Moneyball – in which Brad Pitt’s baseball-manager teams up with Jonah Hill’s economics whiz-kid to revolutionise the scouting and analysis of their players – followed by a panel discussion/debate on this brand of data analytics in sport. Moneyball’s witty script is, as it turns out, based on true events; the film a biography of Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane, adapted carefully and accurately from his nonfiction book of the same name. The film offers a thorough and detailed introduction into tricky sabermetrics, and the proceeding panel discussion (with figures from sports journalism, to Dublin GAA’s own Head of Performance Analysis, to Paddy Power, present) promises some valuable insight into this cutting edge sports science. / Ross McDonnell

 

November 14 2014


where
11 Fitzwilliam Street, Ringsend, Dublin 4.

when
9am - 8pm

how much
Depends. See link.


Artisan Parlour & Grocery

Take one former club promoter, a snug part of the city somewhat overlooked by cool and some publicity from a hit TV series and you have the makings of a recipe for success. Martin Thomas is known to many of the heads especially for his involvement in the legendary club night Strictly Handbag. All the smart dads are looking at where the rental market is moving to (see The Back Page in Phibsborough) and realising these new communities need places to hang in. Artisan is comely in a contemporary way and its hip and healthy menu reflects this. It's got the cold pressed juices from Sprout & co and snack pots from Giggii Gardens. There's a dog station just installed too. And with sandwich specials such as slow braised ox cheek with celeriac and carrot remoulade, you know this venture is more on the boil than a slow burner. / Michael McDermott

   
 

November 15 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
See link

how much
Depends


Oirish Coffee Season

The saddest thing about our coffee revolution has been our hesitancy to 'Irish it up.' It was a lot easier to pour whiskey into your coffee to mask the Nescafé instant misery. Luckily, Vice are dedicating themselves to the classic tipple as the temperatures plummet and the nights draw in. If you like your lasses with no airs and graces, order the Plain Jane - using double distilled Irish whiskey from Kilbeggan, espresso, brown sugar syrup, cream, and freshly grated nutmeg, Vice will be turning that plain Jane into a princess. There'll also be a twist on yer ma's favourite drink on the 80's (after babycham), the Calypso Coffee. They've rebranded her Sweet Maria and the chocolate hit will be courtesy of Wexford chocolatiers Bean & Goose. On the dry? Well, the Malted Hot Chocolate - 30 grams of crushed Malteasers and steamed milk will keep you smug and sober. / Kate Coleman

 

November 15 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
See link

how much
See link

cinema
Life Itself

By the time Roger Ebert passed away in 2013, his ability to speak or eat properly had been greatly hindered following bouts with thyroid and throat cancer, which required the removal of his lower jaw. Despite these setbacks, Ebert did anything but take a back seat. Instead, he persevered and continued to play a pivotal role in the wider cinematic discussion, solidifying his role as America's most beloved film critic in the process. Brimming with affection for the man and the legend, Life Itself is a lovely tribute to Ebert that never once descends into schmaltz. While it captures Ebert at some of his most vulnerable moments and features glowing remembrances, it never places him on too high a pedestal. Instead, this is a warm and measured portrait of someone who can be fairly characterised as a cinematic warrior. / Amy O'Connor

 

November 15 2014


where
The Joinery, 6 Rosemount Terrace, Arbour Hill
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
€5

spoken word
Now Hear This

In a creative twist on the standard, tired and typical slam or speakeasy, The Joinery brings together, or reunites, certain writers who lived or who once lived in-and-around its thrilling environs, the Stoneybatter/Smithfield area. Boasting an impressive line-up, including Faber prize-winning writer Belinda McKeon, Paul Murray, Booker-longlisted author of Skippy Dies, (No. 3 on TIME’s Top Fiction Books of 2010), and Brendan Barrington, Senior Editor at Penguin Ireland and founder of The Dublin Review, Now Hear This is a novel concept, prioritising and privileging a consideration of place and community as it grows and evolves over time, the micro-society and grander ecosystem of the neighbourhood. With a homecoming, assembly reading, these writers, united and informed by a hyper-local vernacular, will share this singular space once again./ Ross McDonnell

 

November 15 2014


where
Ha'Penny Bridge, Wellington Quay / Bachelor's Walk, Dublin
Location Map

when
See link

how much
See link


The Woollen Mills

Having a footfall of about 30,000 people a day with full view of your premises is a solid basis for deciding to feed some of them. Expanding an all encompassing reign of the northside of the Ha'Penny Bridge has lead to the conversion of this old woollen mills into a sister to the Winding Stairs. The provenance of the food remains top notch as expected from one of the earliest adaptors to this trend. There's been a bit of price point confusion with the blur of starter and main but nothing that a simple question won't answer. Curried crab crawl, samphire salads and the resurrection of Gruel are all cause to celebrate. The view from the terraced is another winner even if the Liffey is miserably lit at night. It's far from run of the mill at this budding institution. Feed thee here at once! / Michael McDermott

   
 

November 15 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€12/€8

gig
Loah

The lovely Loah is having her debut headline show this Saturday in Twisted Pepper. You may remember her voice from the start of Trinity Orchestra’s renaissance, where she sang in a stunning rendition of Radiohead. More recently she wowed audiences at Electric Picnic and Body&Soul’s Shapeshifters Ball. Her unique music draws from soul, funk, folk with a raw rock energy. Inspired by greats such as Nina Simone, Bjork, Patti Smith and Malian singer Oumou Sangare, but with a completely original take, this music might have you thinking you’ve discovered an entirely new and wonderful genre. There is a beautiful, sometimes mournful, slowly building intensity to her songs that just makes you want to let loose. The newly released video for her song, Cortège (sung completely in the Sierra Leonean languages Shebro and Mende) is already garnering plenty of praise and attention, so snap up your tickets fast, mes amis. / Olivia Rutter

 

November 15 2014


where
Smithfield Square, adjacent to Light House Cinema

when
https://www.facebook.com/mymeatwagon/info?ref=page_internal

how much
Depends


My Meat Wagon

An immediately important disclaimer is that this writer was the pickiest of eaters, in the guise of a vegetarian until 18 months ago. So I'm not entirely sure what I've inhaled during any of the visits that have all required me to abandon my dodgily-locked steed, but it was damn fine enough to induce a new level of food coma. With a spankin' new smoker and a set of bricks to rest on in Smithfield after traipsing across the Mid West on a quad-state smokehouse experience, the Wagon has retired from it's Mafioso beginnings but still has an offer(ing) you can't refuse. Meat boards offer the widest fare, with choice craft brews from both sides of the pond and popcorn to alleviate anyone of table-wait induced Hangriness. Think Christmas level meat sweats before you make post-dinner plans / Connor Clarke
 

November 15 2014


where
The Twisted Pepper, 54 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10:30 pm

how much
€12/10

club night
Funkineven & Marco Zenker

It has somehow become de rigeur that the best of the best in terms of the world's DJ talent are gracing our shores week in week out, but every now and then someone puts together a booking that catches a rising star who jets in with an energy behind what he / she is doing that quickens the pulse when you see their name on paper. Funkineven and Mario Zeneker are two such firebrands and brilliantly placed together on this bill. London's Funkineven's place on the Eglo roster tells you about as much as you need to know about him, but the proof is in the pudding and his sounds are seriously sweet but in no way sugary. Add Mr Zeneker of top notch Munich Techno label Ilian Tape fame to the mix and you've got a serious evening of dancing on your hands. This isn't just dance music in present tense, this is future music, right here, right now. / Emmet Condon

 

November 15 2014


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
10:30 pm

how much
€10

club night
Back to the Future

Admit it, as youngsters we all hummed the doo doo do dooo tune on our skateboards, imagining ourselves zooming off on hover boards away from Biff, instead of our mother who had found out we had broken one of the good plates. Imagine no more and experience an epic time travelling experience at The Sugar Club. One can only hope the attendee’s adhere to the film’s greatest moment, the blank stares of the ‘not ready’ crowd after Marty aka. Calvin Klein's rollicking performance of the oldie where he comes from. Marvin Berry’s concerned look at his guitar after McFly goes all 1980’s Def Leppard on it deserves a recreation or I want my money back fake 1950’s prom! I wanna see candy coloured prom dresses, I wanna see fruit punch, and I wanna see George McFly representing a win for all nice guys everywhere. We are the kids and we love it. / Ciara Roche

   
 

November 16 2014


where
44A Richmond St, Dublin 2

when
Until 6pm (Sat & Sun), until 7pm (Tues-Fri), closed Monday

how much
Depends


Picado Mexican Pantry

Despite the fact that when our ancestors look back at this period of Dublin’s history they will undoubtedly label it as the Burrito Boom, it is still quite a challenge to find other types of Mexican food. Enter Picado. Founded by Lily, (who also writes a Mexican cooking blog if you need any recipes) she started picking the stock based on what she needed so she could cook at home. It’s all imported directly from Mexico, and is the best selection of ingredients in Dublin for making any sort of Mexican food you’ve been craving, plus all sorts of deliciousness you didn’t know was missing from your life until now. Amidst their stock you can find salsa verde, horchata, chili infused honey, and mole paste. They also have Mexican cooking classes, so you can perfect your enchiladas, salsas, tortillas and more. The last few times I have walked past in the evening there has been a highly enticing vat of sangria up on the counter, so sign me up. / Olivia Rutter

 

November 16 2014


where
26 Kings Inns Street

when
Until 4pm

how much
Depends


Blas Café

This spacious, calm cafe on the ground floor of the Chocolate Factory won’t be “Dublin’s best kept secret” for long. The place is huge, full of long clean tables, perfect for you and all your friends, or you and your laptop. It also doubles at an art gallery— currently they have giant insect holograms on display. Blas is the addicting sort of place that makes you unusually excited to get out of bed in the morning, just so you can go. I live devastatingly far away and I am already planning my Sunday around going back. You’ll find delicious coffee, Wall & Keogh tea, plus a healthy and hearty lunch menu full of comfort food that won’t make you feel like your insides are slicked with grease after. And they really hammer it home with their breakfast/brunch. One of their best sellers is spicy Berber poached eggs, but you can also treat yourself to porridge for a tasty €1, with tempting toppings like their homemade granola available to add on. / Olivia Rutter

 

November 16 2014


where
See link

when
See link

how much
See link


Kimchi

Kimchi, The Hop House or The Shakespeare wears many different hats to match its multiple names. Sneaky beer garden, stockist of 8 Degrees Brewing on a street of generic alcohol brands and, perhaps most importantly, purveyor of delicious Korean food, produced with great efficiency by a very capable staff. If you're having a bad day nothing turns that frown upside down faster than some awesome Chicken Mandu dumplings, reaching places a roll from Centra just can't touch. Plus I have it on good authority that it's the place to be on Korean New Year, if you want to see the bar staff perform an unforgettable version of Forget About Dre. I don't want to make any promises though, the rendition of the West Coast anthem may have been a once off but the tasty fast food that doesn't give you a 3pm slump and the unique premises are a constant. / Kate McEvoy

   
 

November 17 2014


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until January 17th

how much
Free

exhibition
Clerk of Mind

London artist Chris Evans brings his latest work to Essex St.’s Project Arts Centre – a trio of pieces, their media varying from a plaque and its deceptively simple, dissonant announcement, to the display of a dazzling luxury jewel, to a hypertextual space enclosed by three additional oblique objects known only as CLODS. Save for these mountainous CLODS, what we have here seems unassuming. Yet, the exhibit is less modest than it appears on first glance; the collection, roused, stirred and inspired by the relationship between the for- hire artist and his patrons and clients, fine diamond jewellers and members of the international diplomatic community alike, whose material Evans liberally appropriates, manipulates and experiments with, displacing and relocating their commerce and politics, recontextualising into something else entirely. / Ross McDonnell

 

November 17 2014


where
Charlotte Way, Dublin 2.

when
7:30am-4pm, weekdays

how much
Depends


Doughboys

The handsome lads in Doughboys stole my heart and my stomach with a menu that ranges from the reliably meaty - meatball marinara subs and pulled pork'n'crackling combos, to the experimental - the Broccoli sub, with pickled lychee, feta, pine nuts, mayo and fried shallots. A fresh, open, space, and with a brand identity that looks as tasty as the subs, the offices around Harcourt Street possibly have the best lunchtime offerings in the city at their fingertips, and of that, I am mighty jealous. The Club Dough took the misery out of turkey, with moist chunks pimped up with salty, smoky bacon, sparky pickle and a spicy chipotle sauce. All my harping on about cold cuts and cheesy crusts is all well and good, but are you gonna bang dough? / Kate Coleman

 

November 18 2014


where
91 Manor Street, Dublin 7.

when
See link

how much
Depends


The Green Door Bakery

Bakeries in Dublin are few and far between. Even if you leg it to Arún Bakery every Saturday, or to the bread-makers at Temple Bar Market, you're still looking at an annoyingly carb-free Monday to Friday. However, if you are fortunate enough to live river-North, you will find the Green Door Bakery in Stoneybatter is filled with bread-treats. A baguette soft enough to keep those who suffer from tartine-jaw free from pain, a chilli-topped sourdough to elevate your sad minestrone to a feast, and the best cream cakes you will find north of Waterford (forget blah-blahing about blas, their cream cakes is where it's at.) With full cakes coming in at roughly 10 euro, it's the perfect stop-off for a dinner party or birthday treat - forget saccharine darts to M&S, enter through the green door and you'll be grand. / Kate Coleman

 

November 18 2014


where
National Gallery of Ireland, Merrion Sq W & Clare St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until February 8th

how much
Free

exhibition
Hennessy Portrait Prize

Aaand the winner is... Nick Miller, an Aosdána member and painter of considerable degree, who portrayed the recently deceased abstract expressionist, Barrie Cooke. A sensitive choice. He, from the 12 finalists, will receive 15G, and a portrait commission from the National Gallery. This inaugural event is an interesting step for our Irish cultural and national identity. Having no designated portrait gallery is tough on a city's inhabitants. Who would you have chosen? Go view the selection (it's up until Feb 8th). There are enjoyable wild cards like John Beattie's absent sitter or Hugh O'Conner's Beckah. I was rooting for the very prominently displayed recent NCAD graduate, Saoirse Wall, whose selfie-style practice is very much non-paint based. If you disagree with the judges take your picket signs over to the Dáil. What is art without politics? / Georgia

   
 

November 19 2014


where
The Library Project, 4 Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
Free

exhibition & book launch
Gorse No.2 Launch

Gorse’s assured and frequently-brilliant second volume launches with a deserved and well-earned celebration, featuring select readings from the issue’s contributors and an exhibition of the artwork of talented cover designer Niall McCormack. With steely will Gorse has smashed to atoms any agitator’s claim of one-hit-wonder, its second rich harvest of thoughtful, insightful work, ranging from poetry and prose to meticulous criticism, are neither didactic lessons or highfalutin’ lectures, but a satisfying and pleasant pedagogy. One of the city’s brightest and best ideas, realised and executed supremely, if it is too idealistic to hope these narratives become watercooler-worthy, zeitgeist-y local touchstones, their launch is an ample opportunity to pretend, fans amongst fans, like they already are. Unburdened and buoyant, Gorse is a marvel. / Ross McDonnell

 

November 19 2014


where
82 Irishtown Road, Irishtown Road, Dublin 4.

when
6pm-9pm

how much
€20


Sober Lane

It happens. Sharon fancies the pan fried foie gras for starters but you had a late lunch. Fionn plumps for the rib eye steak but happy to pick at the pasta, you'd settle for a coffee but Catherine spent a weekend on a cheese course and wants the board. You smile and grimace whilst doing the tot in your head. The wine consumer takes the bill and proclaims simple division so they can move on to the next drink. A mental sour note is just desserts for biting your tongue. Sober Lane isn't unique in their simple solution but it saves you on the angst. 3 courses, €20, deal with it. JJ Clarke's pub in Irishtown is making it tasty and easy. Fuss free with food glee. Besides admiring their stunning floor tiles, there's a chance for a game of Connect 4 too. If only life were so easy. / Zach Joyce 

 

November 19 2014


where
90-92 Camden Street Lower, Dublin 2.

when
Regular opening hours

how much
Depends


The Butcher's Pantry

The Butcher's Pantry is the Mrs Doyle of New York delis. Hiding coyly behind net curtains, it's a mish mash of industrial stools, pine-ridged panelling and wicker bread baskets. With a limited menu, it shouldn't take you long to establish loyalty to a particular sandwich, and hold on and never let it go. I fell head over Pat Mustard for the Hot Pastrami, pastrami, chorizo, mustard, tobasco and cheddar piled high and toasted into submission. They have some well titled alternatives - the Salmon of Knowledge, the Dixie Chick, and Billy the Kid. It doesn't have a particularly pained, cool vibe to it, but if you have ever queued for a salt beef Brick Lane bagel, you'll know that looks aren't everything, and that the simplest things are sometimes the most satisfying. / Kate Coleman

 

November 19 2014


where
Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College, Dublin 2
01 896 1334
Location Map

when
Until November 21st

how much
€9/4

theatre
Stockholm

The Samuel Beckett Theatre’s Debut Festival commences with first-time-director Claire Hallybone’s staging of the conjuring and declaratively-titled Stockholm; an opaque title signalling both our arid and wintry setting for the hour, and a sinister suggestion of a psychological Stockholm syndrome arising in the marriage of twosome, Kali and Todd. Oscillating between the two, the intimate, tense Stockholm is reminiscent of Ingmar Bergman’s pitch-black, choked-up chamber films (perhaps singularly the especially aching Scenes from a Marriage) and though the human and marital condition likewise gets its close-up, their violence reciprocal, their public/private conflicts argued and agonised on the democratic stage, one powerless to change the fate of two, Stockholm’s system of strings and theatrical devices are uniquely balletic and choric. / Ross McDonnell

 
Ismael Yildiz

Ismael Yildiz casts his eye over proceedings on Baggot Street from his iconic corner kebab shop.

I am originally from Turkey and have been here in this shop since the 1980s. I was visiting here and had an interest in living here.

The space was empty. It used to be a flower shop. There were nightclubs on the street and it was busy around here so I set up. I get regulars from the likes of Doheny and Nesbitts

I have 3 kids now. My nephew works with me here too. I usually work weekends myself. It's tougher now than it used to be in terms of bar trade. 

In the summer I go back to Istanbul for a few months. I cross the Bosphorus and go over to the Asian side.

The guy who owns Iskanders used to work for me. A good few in Zaytoon too. I usually go out for bar food or hotel food myself.

Ismael Kebab shop is on Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2.

Photo: Con O'Donoghue