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A couple of weeks ago, Dublin City Beta Projects' first bike hangar hit Dublin 8. Similar hangars were piloted in Lambeth, South London, in 2013 by the local authority, and they have also since been rolled out in Hackney and Kensington & Chelsea. Taking up roughly a car-space, it's not just that they are secure and community driven, but you can also kiss goodbye to the perfect black handlebar smudge in your hallway.

Having received his key to the Beta hangar a couple of days ago, participant Steve O'Connor told us, "There's not much space to spare in these little houses on John Dillon street so it's great to have a safe place to keep my bike nearby. I look forward to seeing more of them around especially on streets like ours where there's not a whole lot of spare space for bikes."

The hangar in Dublin is currently over-subscribed, but what Beta Projects need from you, in order to see the idea addressed with public input, is communication. On their Twitter they are asking about how much you'd be willing to pay for a hangar service (a small fee so that the system wouldn't be abused), and as the pilot progresses, we're sure they'll have yet more questions for Dublin's cycling twitterati.

Who's been left hangaring on the telephone? Kate or Michael?

"...a nod to 1960's Graphic Design and the Memphis style, which i'm obsessed with!" - Lorraine Monagle
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February 05 2015


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until 9 April

how much
Free

exhibition
A Voodoo Free Phenomenon

As far as the press release is concerned, which is not very far (the remit of the best of its kind extends no further than itself as a press release), Garrett Phelan’s exhibition is about our relationship with historical artefacts. There is indeed a video of the artist in front of a microphone, recounting his visit to Newgrange as a young man. But his account is insular. It is not engaging enough to keep one’s attention from shifting over to two sculptures on reflective black slabs, each consisting of a microphone connected to another, the latter occluded by metal. If these sculptures are not, to any extent, insightful commentaries on the nature of certain means of communication that one uses solely to hear the sound of one’s own voice, then I recant what I said parenthetically about press releases. / Olen Bajarias

 

February 05 2015


where
Kerlin Gallery, Anne's Lane, South Anne Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until 21 March

how much
Free

exhibition
Paul Seawright, The List

Paul Seawright’s latest solo exhibition at the Kerlin Gallery is The List, which focuses on America’s abandoned Rust Belt, as it stretches from New York state, across to Indiana and up to Michigan. The Rust Belt was once the home of American industry and thousands flocked from the South for new opportunities, where many now struggle to make ends meet. Seawright’s work showcases the abandonment of this stretch of middle America and the rurality possible in the urban. People do not feature in his images, but their influences are there; in mown lawns, air conditioners in windows and carefully protected muscle cars. The collection demonstrates how people live within limits and how this poverty impacts the world around them. Nature begins to return, with tree roots cracking pavements and creepers taking over abandoned, undeveloped cul-de-sacs where cats prowl. / Polly Dennison

 

February 05 2015


where
The Liquor Rooms, 7 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
Free

book launch
Spill Simmer Falter Wither

Last year, Cork resident Sara Baume took home first prize in the 2014 Davy Byrnes Short Story Awards for Solesearcher1, which explored the lonesome life of a female plumber in small town Ireland. Today her much anticipated debut novel, described by Joseph O’Connor as a reminder that “language is the most sacred thing we’ve made,” launches in Dublin. The narrator of this story is also an outsider, a hermit-like, middle-aged man, but he finds love when he saves an unfriendly and unwanted one-eyed dog from being put down. Her talent for descriptive language and dark, dark wit take you in as you follow the bleak pair’s adventures as they are forced to leave town. You can find her book on Tramp Press’ website, or in “all good book shops”. / Olivia Rutter

 

February 05 2015


where
The Library Project, 4 Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7pm (runs until Feb. 8th)

how much
Prints for sale

exhibition
Little White Lies

For those who iive in it long enough and still care about it deeply, falling in and out of love is a regular occurrence. For every heart skip at her beauty, there's a heart trip when you look back and your bike's been nicked. Photographer, and hat about town, Aidan Kelly has teamed up with stencil and spray artist DMC to conjure up a buried feeling but one they know still exists. There's Kelly's anchoring glimpses of the city from houses to rails and signage. DMC steps in then to bring clarity and distortion to our initial perceptions, tagging collaborative memos, making the viewer engage on another spin cycle of ideas. Sometimes you can find love again in a hopeful place. / Zach Joyce

   
 

February 06 2015


where
Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay D2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10

gig
Only in Dreams

Weezer. The kind of band you qualify any enthusiasm for by admitting it by saying "I liked The Blue Album and Pinkerton. BUT THAT IS IT." And that's cool. Their family friendly, kinda-suburban grunge sounds like a mid-nineties teen movie, and lord knows how much we love those. At Only in Dreams: The Blue Album VS Pinkerton expect to hear two songs from each of those albums rendered for a nostalgic audience by Dott, windings, Me and My Dog, and Swimmers, so you can take it for granted that you can revisit your youth with Say It Ain't So, Buddy Holly, and Why Bother? at the very least. Hopefully this time you'll be a little less under the influences of teenage ennui and alienation, though. / Kate Coleman

 

February 06 2015


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Patrick's Day

Patrick's Day is certainly not the successor to Leprechaun that the title might suggest, but a very modern tale of infatuation, mental illness, and, well, not anything much more positive than that. Despite the general sense of misery, this is an important story to tell. Airing a side to mental illness oft neglected - that of people who adhere to their meds, yet are never quite well enough to thrive, like our protagonist, Patrick, this is a brave film. It is painful and unfortunate that the object of his affections carnally takes advantage of him to soothe her own suicidal pain within a plot is as chaotic as the characters, making for a multi-dimensional feeling of being swallowed into the film, and it is a rewarding watch. Apart from that, Patrick, it ain't your day, it ain't your day. / Kate Coleman

 

February 06 2015


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
11pm

how much
€7

party
Pulp Fiction After Party

What do they call a Quarter Pounder with Cheese in France? Why, a Royale with Cheese, of course. No, this will not be an exposition on the limitations of the metric system, but rather a celebration of all things Tarantino. The excellent Sugar Club has decided (and I fully agree) that it’s not enough to merely screen Pulp Fiction, wonderful though it is (the haircuts alone are Hall-of-Fame material). To celebrate the man who gave us the Pulp Fiction dance moves all weddings are bereft without we need a blow-out, hip-swinging, Chuck-Berry-appreciating after party. A Tarantino-approved* soundtrack featuring all your favourite numbers from his films will be followed by the excellent vinyl stylings of We Are Kings. Miss it and receive a terrifying visit from Jules Winnfield, Bible in hand. *Not actually Tarantino approved. / Alison Treacy

 

February 06 2015


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Selma

Growing up in America, Martin Luther King Jr. was depicted as more of a mythical figure than a man. I honestly know more about him than George Washington (who assembled his troops, for some war or something, about 500 metres from my house). Apart from being a powerful, riveting and extremely relevant depiction of a groundbreaking period in American history, what makes Selma so fascinating is David Oyelowo’s portrayal of Dr. King. In Selma, you get a peek at the real person behind the paragon. This is a point in his life where he had already become more than a person, he was a symbol. It takes place after “I have a dream,” starting just as he is practicing his speech to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. And what is he worrying about? His ascot. There is no doubt that he was an inspirational leader and public speaker, but he was also fucking smart. / Olivia Rutter

   
 

February 07 2015


where
Make Shop, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2.

when
Until 8 February

how much
€10 ~BOOK HERE

event
The Dog House

Realising you’re female, and experiencing the unease of sitting with your boyfriend's family is strange to say the least, and that’s just one of five different ways of experiencing The Doghouse, the Danish duo Mads Damsbo and Johann Knattrup first-person installation. If you’ve not experienced Oculus Rift, this is a great place to start. Sitting around a ‘real’ dining table only to be transported to a virtual reality table assuming one of the characters in this fully immersive short film (of sorts). It’s quite odd, hard to describe in ways. All in a good way though. I say let chance decide your role, working out your gender / age / roll in this domestic awkwardness all adds to the experience and makes for great comparison chats after, you’ll more than likely want to deconstruct the scene with the other body invaders. I bet you’ll wanna try drink the wine. / Paul Mahon

 

February 07 2015


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Wild

Imagine a messed up, true story of a grief stricken woman told through an awesome Instagram feed. This is Wild. Reese Witherspoon as Cheryl Strayed, hiking the incredibly photogenic Pacific Crest Trail amongst a montage of inspirational quotes, poetry and lyrics. Thankfully, this is juxtaposed with uncomfortable flashbacks of her destructive life. Think heroin dens, dead horses, random sex. This steers things away from Eat Pray Love territory and winds together to tell a powerful story without being condescending. Cheryl also embarks on her hike with a backpack so massive it has it’s own scene and then she screws up on the hike much in the same way you or I might. I liked that. Go see it. You might not leave wanting to change your life but you might decide the walk home from the cinema is actually not that far. / Ali Dunworth

   
 

February 08 2015


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€20/€17.50

gig
Blackalicious

Lyrical mastermind, paragraph paralyzer and rhythmic aristocrat Gift of Gab, (aka the last person you would ever want to get in to a tongue-twister competition with) and DJ/production wizard Chief Xcel are coming to The Sugar Club. They cram more content, vocabulary and entertainment in to each of their songs than most artists put in an entire album, and you can experience it all, (in)appropriately boozy for a Sunday, in a venue where you can get so close to the stage that you will likely get sweat on you. Or, just stand back and bop your head in appreciation of Xcel’s funky, tirelessly uplifting, everything-that-is-good-about-hip-hop beats. I feel like that might hurt your neck though. / Olivia Rutter

 

February 08 2015


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€18/€13

gig
Phronesis

The Wikipedia definition of the word Phronesis (for Ancient Greek fans: φρόνησις) is a word for a type of wisdom or intelligence. It's hard to believe that it's four years since the jazz trio Phronesis were in Dublin for the 12 Points emerging talent festival. Even at that stage you sensed here were a group of musicians wise beyond their years. Comprising Jasper Høiby, double bass; Ivo Neame, piano and Anton Eger, drums - the band are a truly European affair hailing from Denmark, England and Sweden respectively. Signed to the cutting edge Cardiff label Edition Records with three discs since 2010, each successive release has seen evolving innovation. From performing in the dark for audiences to recording their newest Life to Everything in the round (jazz promoters take note), the band have have drawn exciting comparisons to the late E.S.T. / Des FitzGerald

   
 

February 09 2015


where
Outhouse Theatre, 105 Capel St. D8
Location Map

when
12 noon

how much
Mail popupyogadublin@gmail.com

fitness
Yoga

Isn’t there a grand stretch in the day? OK not quite yet, but until it actually gets brighter there’s plenty of stretches to be had around town in the form of pop-up yoga. Fancy doing a few lunchtime downward dogs to support Marriage Equality? The folks at The Outmost have joined forces with Pop-Up Yoga Dublin to host a Hatha Yoga class at 12noon each Monday in February with all proceeds going to the Marriage Equality Campaign. Strengthen your body and your politics all in your lunch break. Or if like me you feel like your karma ran over your dogma this January then yogi Kathy Scott has just the thing. As part of Dublin Fringe Festival she is running Tuesday morning yoga sessions that promise to remap the mind & body in the light filled Fringe Lab studio. Ahhhhhhh. Yes please. Time to shake that asana back into action. / Ali Dunworth

 

February 10 2015


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€20/€18

theatre
A Girl is A Half-formed Thing

Condensing a novel for the stage is no easy feat, but somehow, as a multi-personality one woman show, it manages to transcend the florals that an arresting novel relies on, and establish itself as a strong piece of theatre. This is a pounding, emotional performance - it feels like Aoife Duffin is sweating, wringing out feelings and they splatter at her feet. The lighting is dank, like she is standing in a sewer-pipe, wet under foot. The play is very Irish - dirty uncles scuttle around the story like spiders evading the sinkhole, pagan Catholics cross and bless, cross and bless, and mothers thank and unthank, turning on a penny, never happy, never satisfied. This waking nightmare, no prosthetics, no effects, just turmoil and emotion, will set the invisible creep on your skin, and the edge of darkness on your dreams. / Kate Coleman

   
 

February 11 2015


where
Vicar Street, 58-59 Thomas Street, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€25

gig
The Decemberists

The Decemberists and I grew up together. Or rather, I grew up with them. The strangely appealing voice of Colin Meloy (a name I can’t help but associate with ‘mellifluous’) and their unusual musical arrangements formed a soundtrack to my late adolescence, my college years. Now, as a semi-adult, I can’t think of a band that brings more to its audience: historical re-enactments and tales of vengeance in The Mariner’s Revenge; the repugnant cad narrating The Rake’s Song; haunting, catchy tunes like Yankee Bayonet; the euphoric, exultant, anthemic July, July. Who amongst us hasn’t spent a P.E. class feeling every line and lyric of The Sporting Life? And my favourite, Red Right Ankle, the best ever song to use the words ‘adhere’, ‘sinew’ and ‘ventricles’. Come, see, hear, enjoy, and regret only that they play just one night. / Alison Treacy

 

February 11 2015


where
Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA), 15 Ely Place, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
6pm - 10:30pm

how much
€15 (in 3 comp Blue Moon)

event
Lost Wednesdays

Don't lose your Wednesday, get involved in the RHA's Lost Wednesdays, where you have the run of the galleries after hours - a private view of their current exhibitions, including Mark Garry's ethereal, dreamy exhibition A New Quiet and Amelia Stein's Erris, rural, bleak and melancholic. Erris will be perfectly complemented by the music on the night, with a more folkish bent than the music at previous Lost Wednesdays. Expect the tuneful stylings of Bunoscionn and Lynched, sip on the complimentary Blue Moon brews, and perhaps dig in to some Hog'n'Pop spitroast pig, super-secret slaw and a little mulled cider. Don't look for directions, just get lost... / Kate Coleman

 
The Back Page

We spoke to Amy, Ian and Shane, Dublin's answer to the Mitchell family, managers of new bar The Back Page. 

People don't just come in for one thing - we have board games, ping-pong, foosball and a playstation room. We are looking at expanding to things like bike maintenance, so you can bring your bike in and learn skills that way.

The crowd is a mix of everyone, not complete sports fanatics! We have a few characters, like our neighbours from two doors down who come in every day. We were shocked by the number of people we know who live in the area, and it's a really nice crowd with familiar faces. We didn't realise how much it was needed. People from ten/fifteen minutes away will make the trek down here because it's their kind of bar. It makes sense. There's a good selection of craft beers and cocktails, and you can't really get that anywhere close by.

The building is amazing, with the wooden floors and original benches, but there was a lot of cleaning up to do! It was about sanding for about six to eight weeks, and there's still more to go in the smoking area and upstairs.

The Back Page, 199 Phibsborough Road. Check out the R.A.G.E'S Melee Tournament at the Back Page this Friday. PHOTO: Constance Doyle