Dublin Selected *268

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It's all about the story. Simple as. Catherine Burns, artistic director of the Moth, explained it to the Creative Minds series in the US ambassadors' last night. The power of telling the first person moment as lived, loved and experienced.

It's the same story when it comes to the marriage equality referendum on May 22nd. Confirming that we have amazing liberal minded mates on Facebook will not be enough. There's a story to tell, not to ourselves but to our neighbours, our aunts and the doubting Thomas characters in our lives.

The challenge is on the street, it's one of rejection and explanation because the ultimate danger is the complacency we're coasting towards. The battle will be experienced through the essence of the Moth. That is the story, the coming out and living through. The you equals me. 

A like, an emoji or a share is no longer sufficient. Persuasion will be won through conversation. The next Moth slam in Dublin is themed 'Delusions' and there is a clear and present danger that the marriage equality campaign will reside under this theme unless we start talking to the fence, the borderline and the other side.

Who needs to keep on pushing their love? Michael, Kate or Ben?

"As a child I used to love baking scones with my granny and loved it even more when I could eat most of the raisins when she wasn't looking. " - Jessica Rooney-Deane
... Read More
 
Framed: Colm Mac Con Iomaire

Our chat with the musician was all Kíla, no filler...

I come from a musical family -I started playing violin when I was seven. Myself and my school friends started a band called Kíla and we started busking on Grafton street in 1986. It was there we me met up with Glen Hansard and Mic Christopher and others and started playing music together.

Irish is my first language. It's a naturally poetic and musical operating system. It strikes me also as being a far more liberal language compared to English, which is quite a puritanical language. For example - To talk playfully and informally about sexuality in Irish is easy and natural whereas such conversations in English are more taboo. I think the repressed Irish stereotype came with the relatively recent language transition.

Alan Parker came to see The Frames in The Purty Loft -  I remember they extended the scene that I was in and got Jimmy Rabitte's Ma and sister to dance along to my playing. It was a very surreal and wonderful experience. I'm really looking forward to the Roddy Doyle night in Vicar St. I get to go on first which means I can then enjoy the rest of the night - Damien Dempsey and Richard Hawley and loads more- Deadly! 

See Colm at Whelans on 17 April, or the sold-out Barrytown meets Musictown on Sunday. PHOTO: Killian Broderick

 

April 09 2015


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€20

ballet
Tutus & Beyond...

Know your Pavlova from your Nureyev? Maybe like me, you would struggle to tell a jeté from a piqué. Don't fear because Tutus & Beyond promises to be both an indulgence and an education in the history of the dance form. Ballet Ireland charts the ongoing evolution of ballet from its classical roots in the late-nineteenth century to the contemporary avant-garde work that’s currently impressing audiences around the world. You may never have seen ballet performed live, or perhaps you didn’t think you would be the type. With a diverse programme, featuring rising choreographer Ludovic Ondiviela’s compelling new piece Lost, this is a unique opportunity for Irish audiences to access the purity of dance. Starting their tour in Dublin, make sure to catch this show. / Julieanne McMahon

 

April 09 2015


where
Nag Gallery, Basement, 59 Francis Street, Dublin 8

when
Until April 28th

how much
Free

exhibition
Stephen Dunne - 'Luminous'

Those as yet unfamiliar with the artistic stylings of Stephen Dunne can expect an eclectic, vibrant and visceral showcase in his new show Luminous. Referencing Thomas Pynchon in the introduction to his newest work, Dunne seeks to highlight the multi-faceted nature of society – the constantly changing constellations, relationships, and truths, ever in flux, never static. Dunne’s technique mirrors this principle, the rapidly sketched works in ink, later built on with paint, sometimes evolving as far as animation, all trying to capture an elusive moment in time. Drawing from a myriad of different sources and inspirations (Dunne himself cites the New Yorker cartoons as one such muse), the exhibit will capture that moment of neuron spark when a story begins in your brain. Expect a daring, sometimes dark, often challenging show. / Alison Treacy

 

April 09 2015


where
Liberty Hall, Eden Quay, Dublin 1.


when
7:30pm

how much
€25

spoken word
The Ties That Bind: The Moth

You may have heard The Moth on the radio, or in its dangerously binge-able podcast form. It has a simple format— people telling true stories to audiences on stage, without notes. Since 1997, they have had people from all walks of life up on their stage, sharing more than ten thousand stories. Some of the acts are celebrities or public figures, many are complete unknowns. And of course, where more appropriate for The Moth to tour than Ireland, home of one of the richest histories of oral storytelling in the world? On the night you’ll hear from Islamic scholar Shaykh Dr. Umar Al-Qadri, Sinéad Burke of Minnie Mélange, former seamstress Catherine Cross, journalist Anne Driscoll and human rights activist Tomi Reichental. / Olivia Rutter

   
 

April 10 2015


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Jauja

There are shades of Werner Herzog and Michelangelo Antonioni to Argentinian auteur Lisandro Alonso's latest, which stars Viggo Mortensen as a Danish captain in search of his lost daughter in the wilds of 19th­ century Patagonia. Laid out as a series of carefully composed 4:3 tableaux, often shot with a static camera, Jauja is emphatically Not For Everyone, and patience alone doesn't guarantee appreciation of the film's enigmatic latter stages, which include a hairpin turn into Buñuelian surrealism. Those willing to approach it on its own meditative terms, however, will find it richly rewarding. Its haunting quality – both natural and studiedly artificial – feels authentically timeless, while its political subtext, which traces the roots of European opulence to bloodshed in the colonies, is no less astute for being obliquely presented. / David Turpin

 

April 10 2015


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck

Twenty plus years of listening and I’m still not sure I know all the words to any Nirvana song properly. I got Smells Like Teen Spirit, their biggest hit, totally wrong ‘Here we are now, in containers’ (nope), ‘A mosquito, and a beetle’ (wrong), ‘I’m a lion!’ (no, apparently it was ‘a denial!’). But in my defence they were deciphered from stopping and starting a bootleg Nevermind tape I bought on O’Connell bridge. Probably not the clearest starting point. But finally there may be a glimpse into what the lyrics really meant and of course the tragic genius behind them. Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck is being hailed as the definitive Kurt bio. Director Brett Morgan has pieced together an intimate portrait of the Nirvana frontman using home movies, recordings, artwork, journals and of course his songbooks. Come, as you are. / Ali Dunworth

 

April 10 2015


where
The Back Loft, La Catedral Art Studios, 7-11 St Augustine St, Dublin 8


when
7:30pm

how much
€10

theatre
Gidion's Knot

A large part of the theatrical experience is about feeling immersed in the show; buying into what you are witnessing. Gideon’s Knot provides an intimate and real setting, recreating a children’s classroom, complete with geographical posters of Ireland and a clock that never seems to go fast enough. All that’s missing is the fear of being caught out for forgetting your homework and the intense sensation of wanting to be tucked up at home watching Scooby Doo. A tragic tale with timely dashes of comic relief, the play deals with dark themes without diving headfirst into them, balancing the mood and keeping the audience on edge throughout. Fine acting and a well crafted story complete this immersive experience, Stephanie Courtney exhibiting a particularly impressive performance as forlorn mother Corynn Fell. Such engrossing performances are rare, so be sure to see this one in its current run. / Ben Allen

   
 

April 11 2015


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€5

gig
Canalaphonic Launch

If you, too, are irrationally excited for Portobello’s very own festival, Canalaphonic, start the party early at the launch night in the sweet, sweet Sugar Club. Sit back, relax, and grab some fancy beer or pizza while you preview Corner Boy, Featuring X and Mother Mooch. Your impressive knowledge of the line-up will be quite handy come May. There will be DJs in the (hopefully) sunshiney courtyard, followed by a big ol’ Choice Cuts after party to keep you going all night. / Olivia Rutter

 

April 11 2015


where
Outhouse Theatre, 105 Capel St. D8
Location Map

when
2pm

how much
Free

event
Get Involved With Yes

For those of you all on board with the yes campaign, but at a loss when it comes to knowing how to mobilise yourself in the name of love, there are people who can help. Head to the Outhouse on Saturday to learn about the art of canvassing from Councillor Rebecca Moynihan and Tiernan Brady. Arm yourself with Yes Equality merchandise from the Pop Up Shop, and pick up voter registration forms, pledge cards, and a few tips on how to fight the good fight on social media, in particular with respect to #votewithus videos. It'll be a chill, fun way to inspire you to start chasing pavements, hearts, minds, and most importantly, votes. / Kate Coleman

   
 

April 11 2015


where
Hangar, Andrew's Lane, Dublin 2

when
7:30pm

how much
€15/€17.50

gig
M.O.P

As Legend has it M.O.P's second album, Firing Squad, was the most stolen record from HMV's New York stores in 1998. Listen to just about any record in M.O.P's lengthy back catalog and you'll see why. Ante Up, arguably MOP's crossover breakthrough is the type of track that everybody has heard at least once whether you were aware of it or not. A classic like most of M.O.P's releases, Ante Up is a certified anthem, portraying the groups grim upbringing in Brownsville Brooklyn. Like Biggie's Gimme the Loot, the track portrays street life's solution to crushing poverty and a shortcut to empowerment. Few if any groups have the credentials that M.O.P have, regular collaborators with DJ Premier and can count Biggie and Tupac among their peers. M.O.P despite their reputation have aged well and are arguably as vital as Mob Deep, The Pharcyde or Biggie and Pac, not to be missed. / Jack Broughan

 

April 11 2015


where
Whelan's Upstairs, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€12

gig
Jenn Grant

It is not uncommon for folk musicians to become stale over the course of 3 or 4 albums, be it through trying too hard to innovate(see Tallest Man On Earth) or not trying at all. Some, however, manage to strike the right balance between innovation and maintaining the characteristics that brought them acclaim in the first place. Jenn Grant is one of these elusive folk artists. Featuring an array of collaborators from Canadian folk legend Ron Sexsmith(fans of The OC Christmas Soundtrack rejoice!) and indie rapper Buck 65, her latest album Compostela does a lot without diverging from her beautiful folky sound; psychedelic-folk influences are present but not overbearing, and instrumentation is intricate at without overcomplicating things. The nook upstairs in Whelan’s will provide an intimate setting for a musician sure to leave audiences mesmerised. / Ben Allen

   
 

April 12 2015


where
Farmleigh, Farmleigh Castleknock D 15
Location Map

when
12pm-4pm

how much
Free

day out
Experience Japan

As the poor, forgotten pop duo Mini Viva sang, "I left my heart in Tokyo". Well, they might just find it again this weekend at Farmleigh, because while flights to Japan might be out of your budget, a flit across the Phoenix Park probably isn't. This event will celebrate the more refined elements of Japanese culture, such as Sushi, as well as the more crazy elements - manga and cosplay. Get your kids hooked on martial arts or the very conveniently quiet pursuit of calligraphy. It is coinciding with the Japanese film festival, so should this heavenly weather be interrupted, there will still be Asian-Pacific-specific events to enjoy. / Kate Coleman

 

April 12 2015


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
1pm

how much
See HERE

cinema
Eat Your Children

I’ve heard that a young healthy child, well nursed, is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee or a ragout. This timely documentary ask how the younger generations will fare with the burden the older generations have left for them. Two economic migrants return to Ireland and drive cross country to see how its people have adapted since the demise of the Celtic Tiger. Through interviews and reflection on the country’s history of resistance, the two friends try to understand Ireland’s current identity crisis. / Olivia Rutter

 

April 12 2015


where
IMMA, Military Road, Dublin
01 6129900
Location Map

when
Until April 26th

how much
Free

exhibition
The Beholder's Share

I find it difficult to engage with modern art. Often I enjoy it aesthetically but don’t really understand it; sometimes it is utterly absurd to me(mirrors in art galleries, you know who you are). However, The Beholder’s Share emphasises the oft forgotten role of the viewer, reminding us that it is not merely the art that matters, but also the reaction that it brings about. Unrealised works create a tangible link between artist and viewer as the latter is expected to use his/her imagination in realising a finished version of each piece. Highlights include Brian O’Doherty’s Modest Proposal, which, taking it’s title from Swift’s satirical essay, likens integrating Northern Ireland into the South to eating one’s own children to ease financial woes. The exhibition provides a platform that is more accessible to the skeptical viewer. / Ben Allen

   
 

April 13 2015


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
While We're Young

We are all aging, whether we like it or not. Some do it more gracefully than others, some cling to youth as if it holds them suspended from a cliff edge, grasping desperately for an exuberance that has long since departed them. Noah Baumbach’s latest hipster satire deals with the latter; expect to see a characteristically cringe-inducing Ben Stiller cycling around New York City donning a trilby, chasing dreams of success that have evaded him since he settled into mid-life mediocrity. The film is a poignant and lighthearted meditation on youth and growing old, told through the eyes of a childless middle-aged couple that see themselves caught in between the two. In reality their days of dabbling in hallucinogenics are behind them, but their efforts are endearing and relatable. Some of Baumbach’s least utterly detestable characters are on show and satire is rife, making at least 90 minutes of our saunter towards death that bit more enjoyable. / Ben Allen

 

April 14 2015


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
3.30pm & 8.30pm

how much
€7.50 / €9

cinema
Wild Tales

Fiendishly funny tales of revenge populate these six short Argentine stories. They all hinge on the unhinged with often hilarious and horrific results. It's opener 'Pasternak' is unintentionally prescient in the tragic methods deployed on a flight of coincidence for passengers. Mister Fischer has a Falling Down moment with the clampers falling down while the wedding to trump all weddings bookends these calamities. The thread that binds theis Oscar nominated foreign language hit is that of vulnerability laced with humour. This is a rollicking masterclass in the art of the short story. / Zach Joyce

 

April 15 2015


where
The Science Gallery, Trinity College, Pearse Street, Dublin 2
01 896 4091‎
Location Map

when
1pm

how much
Free, but ticketed

talk
Niall Sweeney + Rory O'Neill

Niall Sweeney, of design agency Pony, is the man you want to communicate your message. He's done it for clients as diverse as The Cake Café, MoMA, Grayson Perry, Gilbert & George's White Cube gallery and This Is Pop Baby, so you know he's good. Most recently, in the lead up to this momentous referendum, he has brought the pink triangle to its logical graphical conclusion by designing materials in support of equality for you, me and yer' mam to print off and flyer, post online, or paste up in your windows. He'll be chatting alongside Rory O'Neill (Panti) with whom he did this OFFSET project in 2014, jazzing up street lamps with disco balls and pink triangles. / Kate Coleman