Through the looking glass: Dublin Selected *279

 

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Remember the episode of The Simpsons where Lisa visits a fortune teller, and she sees her eventual wedding to a toffish Englishman? In it, there’s a bizarre telephone, where the participants can see each other as they chat. Today, we call that Facetime. Then? It was pretty mind-blowing.

Irish architect Cathal Curtin is looking to further innovate on the concept of cross-continental real-time chats with Twin Space. Consisting of two screens, one in Brooklyn’s DUMBO, and one in Front Square at Trinity College, people will be able to see and communicate with people on the other side of the divide simply by visiting the portal. Not unlike RTE2′s classic Foreign Exchange.

It’s an expensive venture, with the Kickstarter looking for ?200,000, but hopefully it will bring us a step closer to reimagining how we communicate with our diaspora in particular. The year of design has brought events to design hubs over the world, and they have re-forged relationships with Irish people there, and with the Irish Times’ Generation Emigration, we’ve heard from a multitude of emigrants from disparate backgrounds, and have found ourselves schooled in the breadth of experience that people have. At a time when whispers of an emigrant vote are growing louder, it is natural that we should find new and creative ways to reach out to one another.

Who’s for port, and who’s for portals, Kate or Michael?


The Green Oasis

Not a mirage.

Gin & Tonic Festival

Too delicious for crying on the stairs with.
 

Mumdance

Yer ma.

Concealing the Spot

A step towards blindness...
 

Mother Absolut Pride Block Party

Mother's pride.

Italia 90 Day

On the march with Bobby's army
 

Vice: unfiltered

Koppi + koffee

Greetings from Ireland Worldwide

Greetings starshine, Ireland says hello.
 

Riddle of the Burial Grounds

Talking in riddles

Alden Penner & Michael Cera

See a unicorn IRL
 

Sean Scully - Home

Absractions

Slow West

Slow, but still quicker than Kanye.
 

Siopaella

Until recently, this writer had no idea that consignment stores…

Green Beards

Brighter days and longer nights finally seem to be here,…
 

We spoke to John Mulvaney, filmmaker, who has created a series called Fractured which takes a microscope to Ireland’s underground music scene. You can watch here and find out more here.

How did you first become interested in alternative music?
It was a natural progression from the music I was listening to from a young age – my pre-teen years were set to the soundtrack of Queen, AC/DC, and whatever popular music we listened to in the 80′s; But when I went to secondary school, friends with older brothers were passing music down to us – bands like Rage Against The Machine, Nirvana, Pantera, Metallica, Slayer and Faith No More – and it just developed from there, really. The early 90′s was a great time for alternative and underground music, in that ‘gateway’ bands like those I mentioned would get radio and TV play (back when MTV was hugely relevant to music), and would help lead you to other obscure, extreme music. Even our own radio stations played this stuff (John Kenny’s metal show on 2FM was hugely important to me), and it was a way to keep up with what was coming out in the days before the internet.

What was the most interesting aspect of making Fractured?
For me it has definitely been connecting with the bands, and seeing how passionate they are in what they do. I’ve spoken with musicians from all around the country at this point, and it’s interesting to see how positive they are about the music they create, despite the seeming lack of interest from any mainstream media. Some of these bands have been going for decades, and have had to carve out their own path, finding their fans along the way. There’s a real sense of pride among them – nothing has been gotten the easy way. They rehearse, plan out their shows when they can afford to do them, and barely scrape together the cash to go into a recording studio. It’s music for the sake of music in its purist form.

What would you like Fractured to achieve?
My aim with the series was to try and capture a good cross section of what was happening in the underground Irish music scene right now – in 2015 and beyond. The sad thing is, many incredible bands have fallen to the wayside over the last decade – struggling with little exposure in a country that doesn’t support this type of music; our track record with giving radio play to even bigger ‘indie’ rock bands is still fairly shameful, especially compared to other countries in Europe.

Ultimately, I’d just like to see it bring those not involved in the scene itself a sense of understanding of the passion, skill and love that goes into making the music.The music itself might not be to everyone’s taste (it is considered ‘underground’ for a reason) but that passion is something most of us can relate to. There’s the hope that by doing this series, it might help people who have a passing interest to get out and support some of these bands, and maybe we’ll see more of them finding success in the future – be it in Ireland or abroad.

What Irish bands should we be looking out for?
We seem to be entering a great time for underground music in Ireland; some of my personal favourites are: Tenro, Malthusian, Vircolac, Wild Rocket, Disguise, Venus Sleeps,No Spill Blood, ZOM, Shardborne and From the Bogs of Aughiska, to name but a few. Primordial are the biggest metal band this country has produced – they have a massive following both from the underground scene here, but even more so from Europe. They are pretty much our equivalent of Metallica, yet they barely get any recognition from the printed press in this country. Not all of these are bands I’ll be working with, but it’s a great time to be into extreme music in this country.

What do you think makes Ireland’s alternative music scene so lively?
I think the fact that this country is so small means that those involved in the scene tend to pull together, and it gets interesting when you have punks playing in metal bands, or predominantly metal players working with experimental electronics, etc. It means that everyone knows everyone, and results in a scene that currently feels very fresh, due to those very different creative elements coming together in ways that it might not happen so easily in other countries. Most people tend to have very eclectic tastes in music, and that is definitely reflected in the scene.

What are your own personal tastes in music?
I love everything from 60′s pop music and jazz through to grindcore, doom and drone, and everything in between. I absolutely love the music from the bands I’m working with – I’m very passionate about metal, and always will be. The fact that I’m a genuine fan of the music has probably helped me out greatly, especially with persuading some bands to get involved in this series.

Why do you feel people should endeavour to find out about Irish music?
I think it’s absolutely essential that people get out there and discover what creativity is happening right on our doorsteps – be it music, art or film. Ireland has a great reputation globally for producing music talent, but unless it gets airplay, most of the population will never even know it exists. Our national broadcasters are largely responsible for that, but the average music fan could be doing a lot too. Support your friends bands, share their music with others; if we don’t, then who will?

How did making Fractured change your view of the Irish music scene?
It has changed it from the point that I never realised how interconnected it all was. Meeting with bands and going through their own histories has been incredible; so many links and relationships between many of them due to changing members – some relationships spanning decades again. It’s fascinating to see, and really helps bind them together in a way. They are united in making music for themselves, irregardless of whether they gain mainstream acceptance or not.

What would you like to explore next?
Fractured only feels like it’s getting started – there’s at least 12 episodes in the works right now. Somehow, it feels like the surface has only been scratched, for me at least. I think there’s definitely scope for telling the ‘bigger picture’ of the underground scene; exploring all those bands that have slipped into obscurity over the last couple of decades, and perhaps exposing a younger generation to music that has passed them by.


Le Help

Le Cool is a free weekly magazine distributed every Thursday that features a selection of cultural events and leisure activities, revealing the things you really shouldn’t miss. We filter out, among other things, the best art, film, music, and club nights, as well as a careful selection of extraordinary bars, restaurants and other fine places. Le Cool content is chosen because we believe it is worth your time and will never be traded for money.

To contact our editorial team, email Kate.
For marketing, advertising and other commercial type stuff, email Michael

Published by: LE COOL GROUP

PRIVACY POLICY All subscriptions to the le cool newsletter have been activated through the submission of the recipient’s e-mail address at the le cool site. If you are receiving the newsletter and do not wish to continue receiving it, follow this link to unsubscribe. If you want to receive our newsletter please subscribe. Your e-mail address and any other personal information stays with us and will never be sold or given away to third parties.


Through the looking glass: Dublin Selected *279

 

Newsletter not displaying correctly? view it in a browser

If you want to unsubscribe click here

Remember the episode of The Simpsons where Lisa visits a fortune teller, and she sees her eventual wedding to a toffish Englishman? In it, there’s a bizarre telephone, where the participants can see each other as they chat. Today, we call that Facetime. Then? It was pretty mind-blowing.

Irish architect Cathal Curtin is looking to further innovate on the concept of cross-continental real-time chats with Twin Space. Consisting of two screens, one in Brooklyn’s DUMBO, and one in Front Square at Trinity College, people will be able to see and communicate with people on the other side of the divide simply by visiting the portal. Not unlike RTE2′s classic Foreign Exchange.

It’s an expensive venture, with the Kickstarter looking for ?200,000, but hopefully it will bring us a step closer to reimagining how we communicate with our diaspora in particular. The year of design has brought events to design hubs over the world, and they have re-forged relationships with Irish people there, and with the Irish Times’ Generation Emigration, we’ve heard from a multitude of emigrants from disparate backgrounds, and have found ourselves schooled in the breadth of experience that people have. At a time when whispers of an emigrant vote are growing louder, it is natural that we should find new and creative ways to reach out to one another.

Who’s for port, and who’s for portals, Kate or Michael?


The Green Oasis

Not a mirage.

Gin & Tonic Festival

Too delicious for crying on the stairs with.
 

Mumdance

Yer ma.

Concealing the Spot

A step towards blindness...
 

Mother Absolut Pride Block Party

Mother's pride.

Italia 90 Day

On the march with Bobby's army
 

Vice: unfiltered

Koppi + koffee

Greetings from Ireland Worldwide

Greetings starshine, Ireland says hello.
 

Riddle of the Burial Grounds

Talking in riddles

Alden Penner & Michael Cera

See a unicorn IRL
 

Sean Scully - Home

Absractions

Slow West

Slow, but still quicker than Kanye.
 

Siopaella

Until recently, this writer had no idea that consignment stores…

Green Beards

Brighter days and longer nights finally seem to be here,…
 

We spoke to John Mulvaney, filmmaker, who has created a series called Fractured which takes a microscope to Ireland’s underground music scene. You can watch here and find out more here.

How did you first become interested in alternative music?
It was a natural progression from the music I was listening to from a young age – my pre-teen years were set to the soundtrack of Queen, AC/DC, and whatever popular music we listened to in the 80′s; But when I went to secondary school, friends with older brothers were passing music down to us – bands like Rage Against The Machine, Nirvana, Pantera, Metallica, Slayer and Faith No More – and it just developed from there, really. The early 90′s was a great time for alternative and underground music, in that ‘gateway’ bands like those I mentioned would get radio and TV play (back when MTV was hugely relevant to music), and would help lead you to other obscure, extreme music. Even our own radio stations played this stuff (John Kenny’s metal show on 2FM was hugely important to me), and it was a way to keep up with what was coming out in the days before the internet.

What was the most interesting aspect of making Fractured?
For me it has definitely been connecting with the bands, and seeing how passionate they are in what they do. I’ve spoken with musicians from all around the country at this point, and it’s interesting to see how positive they are about the music they create, despite the seeming lack of interest from any mainstream media. Some of these bands have been going for decades, and have had to carve out their own path, finding their fans along the way. There’s a real sense of pride among them – nothing has been gotten the easy way. They rehearse, plan out their shows when they can afford to do them, and barely scrape together the cash to go into a recording studio. It’s music for the sake of music in its purist form.

What would you like Fractured to achieve?
My aim with the series was to try and capture a good cross section of what was happening in the underground Irish music scene right now – in 2015 and beyond. The sad thing is, many incredible bands have fallen to the wayside over the last decade – struggling with little exposure in a country that doesn’t support this type of music; our track record with giving radio play to even bigger ‘indie’ rock bands is still fairly shameful, especially compared to other countries in Europe.

Ultimately, I’d just like to see it bring those not involved in the scene itself a sense of understanding of the passion, skill and love that goes into making the music.The music itself might not be to everyone’s taste (it is considered ‘underground’ for a reason) but that passion is something most of us can relate to. There’s the hope that by doing this series, it might help people who have a passing interest to get out and support some of these bands, and maybe we’ll see more of them finding success in the future – be it in Ireland or abroad.

What Irish bands should we be looking out for?
We seem to be entering a great time for underground music in Ireland; some of my personal favourites are: Tenro, Malthusian, Vircolac, Wild Rocket, Disguise, Venus Sleeps,No Spill Blood, ZOM, Shardborne and From the Bogs of Aughiska, to name but a few. Primordial are the biggest metal band this country has produced – they have a massive following both from the underground scene here, but even more so from Europe. They are pretty much our equivalent of Metallica, yet they barely get any recognition from the printed press in this country. Not all of these are bands I’ll be working with, but it’s a great time to be into extreme music in this country.

What do you think makes Ireland’s alternative music scene so lively?
I think the fact that this country is so small means that those involved in the scene tend to pull together, and it gets interesting when you have punks playing in metal bands, or predominantly metal players working with experimental electronics, etc. It means that everyone knows everyone, and results in a scene that currently feels very fresh, due to those very different creative elements coming together in ways that it might not happen so easily in other countries. Most people tend to have very eclectic tastes in music, and that is definitely reflected in the scene.

What are your own personal tastes in music?
I love everything from 60′s pop music and jazz through to grindcore, doom and drone, and everything in between. I absolutely love the music from the bands I’m working with – I’m very passionate about metal, and always will be. The fact that I’m a genuine fan of the music has probably helped me out greatly, especially with persuading some bands to get involved in this series.

Why do you feel people should endeavour to find out about Irish music?
I think it’s absolutely essential that people get out there and discover what creativity is happening right on our doorsteps – be it music, art or film. Ireland has a great reputation globally for producing music talent, but unless it gets airplay, most of the population will never even know it exists. Our national broadcasters are largely responsible for that, but the average music fan could be doing a lot too. Support your friends bands, share their music with others; if we don’t, then who will?

How did making Fractured change your view of the Irish music scene?
It has changed it from the point that I never realised how interconnected it all was. Meeting with bands and going through their own histories has been incredible; so many links and relationships between many of them due to changing members – some relationships spanning decades again. It’s fascinating to see, and really helps bind them together in a way. They are united in making music for themselves, irregardless of whether they gain mainstream acceptance or not.

What would you like to explore next?
Fractured only feels like it’s getting started – there’s at least 12 episodes in the works right now. Somehow, it feels like the surface has only been scratched, for me at least. I think there’s definitely scope for telling the ‘bigger picture’ of the underground scene; exploring all those bands that have slipped into obscurity over the last couple of decades, and perhaps exposing a younger generation to music that has passed them by.


Le Help

Le Cool is a free weekly magazine distributed every Thursday that features a selection of cultural events and leisure activities, revealing the things you really shouldn’t miss. We filter out, among other things, the best art, film, music, and club nights, as well as a careful selection of extraordinary bars, restaurants and other fine places. Le Cool content is chosen because we believe it is worth your time and will never be traded for money.

To contact our editorial team, email Kate.
For marketing, advertising and other commercial type stuff, email Michael

Published by: LE COOL GROUP

PRIVACY POLICY All subscriptions to the le cool newsletter have been activated through the submission of the recipient’s e-mail address at the le cool site. If you are receiving the newsletter and do not wish to continue receiving it, follow this link to unsubscribe. If you want to receive our newsletter please subscribe. Your e-mail address and any other personal information stays with us and will never be sold or given away to third parties.