Reel Action: Dublin Selected *293

 

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As we all know, the unfortunate truth is that there is still such a significant disparity in the film industry between male and female roles, one that frequently needs to be addressed and incessantly challenged. One remarkably effective way of doing so is to celebrate the women that have made, and continue to make, a meaningful stamp on the industry. This weekend allows for one such celebration.

Propelling women to the forefront is the goal of The Feminist Film Festival. A weekend entirely dedicated to combating the marginalising of women in the industry and revering the success of women in film to date. The festival showcases women who relentlessly fought for liberation, pioneered change and revolutionised nations, and those continuing to do so today.

While it important to laud the success of such artists, it is equally as valuable to be informed on the challenges that are ongoing. Women in Film and Television in Ireland details the alarming figures of our indigenous film industry, such as: only 13% of Irish-produced screenplays in the last twenty years were written by female writers, and only one Irish female (Pat Murphy) has directed three feature length films. Moreover, the statics provided by WFT demonstrate that women's input behind the camera is steadily decreasing. Although just recently launched, WFT have already established a clear set of objectives to ensure that the role of women in the Irish film and television sector takes a new, meritocratic, and inclusive trajectory.

Who's in the director's chair in Le Cool this week? Stephanie or Michael?


Fashion Forward: Designing for Every Body

by Amelia O'Mahony-Brady

Relatively Speaking Gallery Tour

by Zara Hedderman
 

Lumo

By Nialler9

HeeBeeGeeBees

by Zara Hedderman
 

Moodymann

by Stephanie Kelly

Conor Walsh

by Michael McDermott
 

Dublin Made Me Market

by Zara Hedderman

At a Glance: Portraits by John Butler Yeats

by Aidan Kelly-Murphy
 

They Will Have to Kill Us First

by Olen Bajarias

Silvia Stori

by Amelia O'Mahony-Brady
 

Gretchen Bender

by Stephanie Kelly

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

by Zara Hedderman
 

Om Diva & Atelier 27 Collections' Launch

by Amelia O'Mahony-Brady

Floorplan

by Antonio Gallo
 

Sister Sadie

Brother Hubbard's Sister Sadie.
 

The man behind Homebeat, Another Love Story and Fading Light turns his hand to something new at Thirty Four.

Photo credits: Killian Broderick

Can we play the cynic here and ask does Dublin need another coffee shop?
Ha, touché, no the city NEEDS cheaper rents, NEEDS longer club opening hours, NEEDS a solution to the shocking homelessness, NEEDS support for the artistic community which is being priced out of the streets they helped to develop and NEEDS a better transport network to name a few, but if I'm to be cynical it probably doesn't NEED an online magazine telling middle class people how to spend their expendable income either (!!). But the time had come, I felt, for Homebeat to take the next step in it's evolution which I hoped would be a physical base, a place to develop a more complete identity and a place to further incubate the community it has somewhat spawned thus far.

What is the idea behind 34 and how do you hope to make it stand out?
It's really what I said above, a physical base to call home as an office, and a place to give Homebeat a physical presence and a chance to develop the feeling around it.

What is your own background and your personal experience which you hope to bring to the space?
My background is a story in itself – I went from studying Theatre in Trinity to work in radio to becoming a physiotherapist to ending up (very happily thusfar) messing about with music and now this. So it certainly hasn't been a straight line to here, but I can actually very genuinely say that the business is in the blood – my family run a small but very hardworking bakery business in Co. Limerick, my grandmother started baking Christmas cakes in her hallway to tide the family over during tough times and my Dad and Uncles run the business that grew from that. While their business landscape and thus model is very different in rural West Limerick, their unerring commitment to hard work and humble determination towards constant perfection is a constant inspiration and no little challenge so I guess I hope to bring some of that to whatever I do, but all-round it's my true belief that any sort of enterprise, whether it is a festival or a coffee shop, exists on the strength of your own belief in the idea – only you really have is the vision that is in your heart for it, and that is the only thing that separates you from the other businesses, so I hope I can bring that to the space. All the business's that inspire me are small, fully formed ideas that are honed and crafted into a single entity. I guess I'm hoping I can keep my nose to the grindstone and manage that.

You are bringing a record store element to the space also? What will be on offer?

The record store element is really to try and have a very strong tie in with the Homebeat vibe, to keep the concepts linked and also to make sure we're putting our wall space where our mouths are so to speak by continuing to support the incredible raft if Irish independent artists who populate 99% of our events. These are the people who we have watched develop with us from the cosy confines of sitting room shows, to three day festival headliners and we want to be a place where someone can come and left through a select collection of these artists, talk to us about what kind of music it is and who makes it and for us to help the bands that make our events so so special in any small way we can by spreading the word on the ground about their incredible works.

What is the biggest challenge in setting up a owner run business in the city right now?
There are lots, but I think rising rents are the main one I would see. I am really lucky in that the building that houses Thirty Four is run by Mart Studios and as such houses a bunch of other artists and start ups all loosely based around music and design, so that eases the burden of starting off and paying colossal rents, but it's becoming a really serious issue, I have noticed a huge difference in my general group of friends in the past 12 months – everyone is now working absolutely flat out just to pay housing and business rents, it's becoming untenable for the small enterprise to exist whether that's as a sole trader or as a business. So all of the amazing advances and dynamism that ironically popped up during the recession is now in danger of being squeezed out of the city.

What's your own favourite coffee shop in the city?
Ah, that's a really tough one. I have a few for sure, The Fumbally is not only a favourite as a cafe in itself, but an inspiration in terms of their commitment to a business vision and their incredible precision and passion in developing and presenting it. I can't commend Aisling, Luca and all the team enough. In terms of somewhere I love to eat, I really really love Slice in Stoneybatter and embarrassingly only ever order one thing as I love it so much, but it's a gorgeous little space, really well run and really well designed also. Similarly I'm a fan of Wall & Keoghs and have a real soft spot for Cross Gallery Cafe which is a hidden gem on Francis St and I can't go more than a few weeks without a sausage roll from The Black Apple in Harolds Cross either!

Can you list one improvement in Dublin you'd like to witness in the next 12 months?

I'd really like to see the city start to take care of small enterprise and the artistic community in a meaningful way. It seems so quick to shout from the rooftops about the output of these communities as a marker of the city's vibrancy, but very slow to really help them out in a meaningful way at the ground level. How this comes out in a practical sense, I don't know. As someone who runs events and parties, well the opening hours are a constant frustration but the lack of alternative spaces once more now that big business is interested in every nook and cranny that was previously invisible to their eyes – people need space to create and foster art and these people are not the ones with the money to pay 900 euro a month for a studio on top of 700 a month to share a house. The city needs to recognise this and act or else we will loose the dynamism that has marked Dublin as an exciting, vibrant and culturally forward place to be. Hopefully, in it's own tiny way, maybe Thirty Four can add to this sense a little, but I think it's ilk needs to be protected and encouraged.

Thirty Four, Lennox Street, Portobello, Dublin 8.


Le Help

Le Cool is a free weekly magazine distributed every Thursday that features a selection of cultural events and leisure activities, revealing the things you really shouldn't miss. We filter out, among other things, the best art, film, music, and club nights, as well as a careful selection of extraordinary bars, restaurants and other fine places. Le Cool content is chosen because we believe it is worth your time and will never be traded for money.

To contact our editorial team, email Stephanie.
For marketing, advertising and other commercial type stuff, email Michael

Published by: LE COOL GROUP

PRIVACY POLICY All subscriptions to the le cool newsletter have been activated through the submission of the recipient's e-mail address at the le cool site. If you are receiving the newsletter and do not wish to continue receiving it, follow this link to unsubscribe. If you want to receive our newsletter please subscribe. Your e-mail address and any other personal information stays with us and will never be sold or given away to third parties.


http://dublin.lecool.com/newsletter/2015-10-29/

 

Newsletter not displaying correctly? view it in a browser

If you want to unsubscribe click here

As we all know, the unfortunate truth is that there is still such a significant disparity in the film industry between male and female roles, one that frequently needs to be addressed and incessantly challenged. One remarkably effective way of doing so is to celebrate the women that have made, and continue to make, a meaningful stamp on the industry. This weekend allows for one such celebration.

Propelling women to the forefront is the goal of The Feminist Film Festival. A weekend entirely dedicated to combating the marginalising of women in the industry and revering the success of women in film to date. The festival showcases women who relentlessly fought for liberation, pioneered change and revolutionised nations, and those continuing to do so today.

While it important to laud the success of such artists, it is equally as valuable to be informed on the challenges that are ongoing. Women in Film and Television in Ireland details the alarming figures of our indigenous film industry, such as: only 13% of Irish-produced screenplays in the last twenty years were written by female writers, and only one Irish female (Pat Murphy) has directed three feature length films. Moreover, the statics provided by WFT demonstrate that women's input behind the camera is steadily decreasing. Although just recently launched, WFT have already established a clear set of objectives to ensure that the role of women in the Irish film and television sector takes a new, meritocratic, and inclusive trajectory.

Who's in the director's chair in Le Cool this week? Stephanie or Michael?


Fashion Forward: Designing for Every Body

by Amelia O'Mahony-Brady

Relatively Speaking Gallery Tour

by Zara Hedderman
 

Lumo

By Nialler9

HeeBeeGeeBees

by Zara Hedderman
 

Moodymann

by Stephanie Kelly

Conor Walsh

by Michael McDermott
 

Dublin Made Me Market

by Zara Hedderman

At a Glance: Portraits by John Butler Yeats

by Aidan Kelly-Murphy
 

They Will Have to Kill Us First

by Olen Bajarias

Silvia Stori

by Amelia O'Mahony-Brady
 

Gretchen Bender

by Stephanie Kelly

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

by Zara Hedderman
 

Om Diva & Atelier 27 Collections' Launch

by Amelia O'Mahony-Brady

Floorplan

by Antonio Gallo
 

Sister Sadie

Brother Hubbard's Sister Sadie.
 

The man behind Homebeat, Another Love Story and Fading Light turns his hand to something new at Thirty Four.

Photo credits: Killian Broderick

Can we play the cynic here and ask does Dublin need another coffee shop?
Ha, touché, no the city NEEDS cheaper rents, NEEDS longer club opening hours, NEEDS a solution to the shocking homelessness, NEEDS support for the artistic community which is being priced out of the streets they helped to develop and NEEDS a better transport network to name a few, but if I'm to be cynical it probably doesn't NEED an online magazine telling middle class people how to spend their expendable income either (!!). But the time had come, I felt, for Homebeat to take the next step in it's evolution which I hoped would be a physical base, a place to develop a more complete identity and a place to further incubate the community it has somewhat spawned thus far.

What is the idea behind 34 and how do you hope to make it stand out?
It's really what I said above, a physical base to call home as an office, and a place to give Homebeat a physical presence and a chance to develop the feeling around it.

What is your own background and your personal experience which you hope to bring to the space?
My background is a story in itself – I went from studying Theatre in Trinity to work in radio to becoming a physiotherapist to ending up (very happily thusfar) messing about with music and now this. So it certainly hasn't been a straight line to here, but I can actually very genuinely say that the business is in the blood – my family run a small but very hardworking bakery business in Co. Limerick, my grandmother started baking Christmas cakes in her hallway to tide the family over during tough times and my Dad and Uncles run the business that grew from that. While their business landscape and thus model is very different in rural West Limerick, their unerring commitment to hard work and humble determination towards constant perfection is a constant inspiration and no little challenge so I guess I hope to bring some of that to whatever I do, but all-round it's my true belief that any sort of enterprise, whether it is a festival or a coffee shop, exists on the strength of your own belief in the idea – only you really have is the vision that is in your heart for it, and that is the only thing that separates you from the other businesses, so I hope I can bring that to the space. All the business's that inspire me are small, fully formed ideas that are honed and crafted into a single entity. I guess I'm hoping I can keep my nose to the grindstone and manage that.

You are bringing a record store element to the space also? What will be on offer?

The record store element is really to try and have a very strong tie in with the Homebeat vibe, to keep the concepts linked and also to make sure we're putting our wall space where our mouths are so to speak by continuing to support the incredible raft if Irish independent artists who populate 99% of our events. These are the people who we have watched develop with us from the cosy confines of sitting room shows, to three day festival headliners and we want to be a place where someone can come and left through a select collection of these artists, talk to us about what kind of music it is and who makes it and for us to help the bands that make our events so so special in any small way we can by spreading the word on the ground about their incredible works.

What is the biggest challenge in setting up a owner run business in the city right now?
There are lots, but I think rising rents are the main one I would see. I am really lucky in that the building that houses Thirty Four is run by Mart Studios and as such houses a bunch of other artists and start ups all loosely based around music and design, so that eases the burden of starting off and paying colossal rents, but it's becoming a really serious issue, I have noticed a huge difference in my general group of friends in the past 12 months – everyone is now working absolutely flat out just to pay housing and business rents, it's becoming untenable for the small enterprise to exist whether that's as a sole trader or as a business. So all of the amazing advances and dynamism that ironically popped up during the recession is now in danger of being squeezed out of the city.

What's your own favourite coffee shop in the city?
Ah, that's a really tough one. I have a few for sure, The Fumbally is not only a favourite as a cafe in itself, but an inspiration in terms of their commitment to a business vision and their incredible precision and passion in developing and presenting it. I can't commend Aisling, Luca and all the team enough. In terms of somewhere I love to eat, I really really love Slice in Stoneybatter and embarrassingly only ever order one thing as I love it so much, but it's a gorgeous little space, really well run and really well designed also. Similarly I'm a fan of Wall & Keoghs and have a real soft spot for Cross Gallery Cafe which is a hidden gem on Francis St and I can't go more than a few weeks without a sausage roll from The Black Apple in Harolds Cross either!

Can you list one improvement in Dublin you'd like to witness in the next 12 months?

I'd really like to see the city start to take care of small enterprise and the artistic community in a meaningful way. It seems so quick to shout from the rooftops about the output of these communities as a marker of the city's vibrancy, but very slow to really help them out in a meaningful way at the ground level. How this comes out in a practical sense, I don't know. As someone who runs events and parties, well the opening hours are a constant frustration but the lack of alternative spaces once more now that big business is interested in every nook and cranny that was previously invisible to their eyes – people need space to create and foster art and these people are not the ones with the money to pay 900 euro a month for a studio on top of 700 a month to share a house. The city needs to recognise this and act or else we will loose the dynamism that has marked Dublin as an exciting, vibrant and culturally forward place to be. Hopefully, in it's own tiny way, maybe Thirty Four can add to this sense a little, but I think it's ilk needs to be protected and encouraged.

Thirty Four, Lennox Street, Portobello, Dublin 8.


Le Help

Le Cool is a free weekly magazine distributed every Thursday that features a selection of cultural events and leisure activities, revealing the things you really shouldn't miss. We filter out, among other things, the best art, film, music, and club nights, as well as a careful selection of extraordinary bars, restaurants and other fine places. Le Cool content is chosen because we believe it is worth your time and will never be traded for money.

To contact our editorial team, email Stephanie.
For marketing, advertising and other commercial type stuff, email Michael

Published by: LE COOL GROUP

PRIVACY POLICY All subscriptions to the le cool newsletter have been activated through the submission of the recipient's e-mail address at the le cool site. If you are receiving the newsletter and do not wish to continue receiving it, follow this link to unsubscribe. If you want to receive our newsletter please subscribe. Your e-mail address and any other personal information stays with us and will never be sold or given away to third parties.